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I am writing about an apparent corruption that occurs when using CUDA's atomicAdd() on my Nvidia GTX 560Ti card. During development of some code I ran into problems with atomicAdd, where it appeared that it was corrupting memory. I devised a test to see whether this was indeed the case, and whether the behavior could be duplicated outside of the conditions of my application. I wrote a test program that increments a sparse number of locations in a buffer with atomicAdd. On my 560Ti the test shows that atomicAdd corrupts random bits in memory. In particular, a small number of (seemingly) randomly placed bit in locations not intentionally being accessed or modified were flipped. The kernel code is simple, it has a single atomicAdd. The test code is as follows:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <sys/time.h>

#define ANSI_RED "\e[0;41m\e[41;37m"
#define ANSI_BLACK "\e[0;30m"

__global__ void kernel( unsigned int *a, unsigned int *map, int M, int N )
{
    // Add to buffer.
    atomicAdd( a + map[ blockIdx.x * N + threadIdx.x ], 1 );
}

template < class T > void swap( T &a, T &b ) { T t; t = a; a = b; b = t; }

int main( void )
{
    // Chooses 560Ti on my machine
    cudaSetDevice( 1 );
    srand( time( 0 ) );
    unsigned int M = 1024, N = 256;
    unsigned int L = M * N, K = N;
    unsigned int *dev_buf, *dev_map;
    unsigned int *buf = new unsigned int[ L ];
    unsigned int *map = new unsigned int[ L ];
    unsigned int *indices = new unsigned int[ K ];
    bool *check = new bool[ L ];

    // Use buffer to indicate which spots in buffer should have valid values.
    for( int l = 0; l < L; l++ ) check[ l ] = false;

    // Generate K random indices into an L-sized buffer, init "check"
    for( int k = 0; k < K; k++ )
    {
        int i = rand( ) % L;
        while( check[ i ] )
            i = rand( ) % L;
        indices[ k ] = i;
        check[ i ] = true;
    }

    // Generate a random M (blocks) x N (threads) array "map" of indices that contains
    //   offsets into "buf" such that there are at most K locations in "buf" that
    //   should be written to.
    for( int m = 0; m < M; m++ )
        for( int n = 0; n < N; n++ ) // Init.
            map[ m * N + n ] = indices[ n ];
    for( int i = 0; i < L; i++ ) // Shuffle.
        swap( map[ i ], map[ i + rand( ) % ( L - i ) ] );

    // Allocate and initialize device memory.
    cudaMalloc( &dev_buf, L * sizeof( unsigned int ) );
    cudaMalloc( &dev_map, N * M * sizeof( unsigned int ) );
    cudaMemset( dev_buf, 0, L * sizeof( unsigned int ) );
    cudaMemcpy( dev_map, map, L * sizeof( unsigned int ), cudaMemcpyHostToDevice );

    kernel<<< M, N >>>( dev_buf, dev_map, M, N );

    // Copy back to host.
    cudaMemcpy( buf, dev_buf, L * sizeof( unsigned int ), cudaMemcpyDeviceToHost );

    // Print non-zero values.  Highlight abnormalities.
    int j = 0;
    for( int i = 0; i < L; i++ )
    {
        if( buf[ i ] != 0 )
        {
            if( ( buf[ i ] == M ) || ( buf[ i ] == 2 * M ) )
                printf( "%d @ %d [%s]\t",
                        buf[ i ], i, check[ i ] ? "true" : "false" );
            else
                printf( ANSI_RED "%d @ %d [%s]\t" ANSI_BLACK,
                        buf[ i ], i, check[ i ] ? "true" : "false" );
            j++;
        }
    }
    printf( "\nj = %d\n", j );
}

Compiled with:

nvcc test_atomicadd_bug.cu -o test_atomicadd_bug -arch sm_21

All the kernel calls should do (in aggregate) is increment all K locations M times, resulting in a K * M = 1024 result in each of the locations. So upon running the code, it should print out the non-zero values (1024) and their locations. In the example output below, however, it instead printed out one 1023 and one 1 in addition to 255 instances of 1024. On other runs, the results are different. Even if srand( 0 ) replaces the time-seeeded RNG, the results are different run to run. I have tried this on both the GTX 560Ti as well as a Tesla C2070. The Tesla does not exhibit any corruption. I do not have access to another 560Ti.

1024 @ 1228 [true]    1024 @ 1271 [true]    1024 @ 1842 [true]    1024 @ 2480 [true]    1024 @ 3012 [true]
1024 @ 3802 [true]    1024 @ 4649 [true]    1024 @ 5636 [true]    1024 @ 6988 [true]    1024 @ 9400 [true]
1024 @ 10912 [true]    1024 @ 10930 [true]    1024 @ 11550 [true]    1024 @ 11888 [true]    1024 @ 12047 [true]
1024 @ 12837 [true]    1024 @ 12868 [true]    1024 @ 12991 [true]    1024 @ 16294 [true]    1024 @ 16690 [true]
1024 @ 17396 [true]    1024 @ 17529 [true]    1024 @ 19857 [true]    1024 @ 20926 [true]    1024 @ 22189 [true]
1024 @ 22391 [true]    1024 @ 22613 [true]    1024 @ 22851 [true]    1024 @ 23562 [true]    1024 @ 23955 [true]
1024 @ 24598 [true]    1024 @ 26058 [true]    1024 @ 26441 [true]    1024 @ 26962 [true]    1024 @ 27141 [true]
1024 @ 28101 [true]    1024 @ 28332 [true]    1024 @ 29485 [true]    1024 @ 29487 [true]    1024 @ 29942 [true]
1024 @ 31213 [true]    1024 @ 31965 [true]    1024 @ 35774 [true]    1024 @ 39342 [true]    1024 @ 39883 [true]
1024 @ 39960 [true]    1024 @ 40252 [true]    1024 @ 41435 [true]    1024 @ 42975 [true]    1024 @ 43336 [true]
1024 @ 44527 [true]    1024 @ 44657 [true]    1 @ 45494 [false]    1024 @ 46940 [true]    1024 @ 46983 [true]
1024 @ 48660 [true]    1024 @ 49034 [true]    1024 @ 49420 [true]    1024 @ 49620 [true]    1024 @ 50813 [true]
1024 @ 53859 [true]    1024 @ 55527 [true]    1024 @ 56677 [true]    1024 @ 57048 [true]    1024 @ 57759 [true]
1024 @ 58505 [true]    1024 @ 59539 [true]    1024 @ 59856 [true]    1024 @ 60341 [true]    1024 @ 61556 [true]
1024 @ 61733 [true]    1023 @ 61878 [true]    1024 @ 62025 [true]    1024 @ 65333 [true]    1024 @ 66131 [true]
1024 @ 67196 [true]    1024 @ 69428 [true]    1024 @ 70555 [true]    1024 @ 73135 [true]    1024 @ 73696 [true]
1024 @ 76797 [true]    1024 @ 76947 [true]    1024 @ 79166 [true]    1024 @ 79301 [true]    1024 @ 80182 [true]
1024 @ 80348 [true]    1024 @ 80574 [true]    1024 @ 81386 [true]    1024 @ 84416 [true]    1024 @ 86472 [true]
1024 @ 88234 [true]    1024 @ 88622 [true]    1024 @ 89355 [true]    1024 @ 89571 [true]    1024 @ 90716 [true]
1024 @ 91386 [true]    1024 @ 94846 [true]    1024 @ 95779 [true]    1024 @ 99146 [true]    1024 @ 99569 [true]
1024 @ 100202 [true]    1024 @ 102972 [true]    1024 @ 103909 [true]    1024 @ 104373 [true]    1024 @ 107707 [true]
1024 @ 108543 [true]    1024 @ 108617 [true]    1024 @ 109212 [true]    1024 @ 109388 [true]    1024 @ 111836 [true]
1024 @ 113078 [true]    1024 @ 113343 [true]    1024 @ 114451 [true]    1024 @ 114849 [true]    1024 @ 115024 [true]
1024 @ 115338 [true]    1024 @ 116675 [true]    1024 @ 118624 [true]    1024 @ 119884 [true]    1024 @ 120807 [true]
1024 @ 121993 [true]    1024 @ 122050 [true]    1024 @ 124643 [true]    1024 @ 125161 [true]    1024 @ 125843 [true]
1024 @ 126890 [true]    1024 @ 127718 [true]    1024 @ 127810 [true]    1024 @ 129646 [true]    1024 @ 129907 [true]
1024 @ 132288 [true]    1024 @ 132706 [true]    1024 @ 135574 [true]    1024 @ 136913 [true]    1024 @ 137346 [true]
1024 @ 138326 [true]    1024 @ 138685 [true]    1024 @ 138939 [true]    1024 @ 140996 [true]    1024 @ 141304 [true]
1024 @ 143902 [true]    1024 @ 145723 [true]    1024 @ 146149 [true]    1024 @ 149696 [true]    1024 @ 149726 [true]
1024 @ 150294 [true]    1024 @ 152057 [true]    1024 @ 152198 [true]    1024 @ 152239 [true]    1024 @ 153002 [true]
1024 @ 153776 [true]    1024 @ 156081 [true]    1024 @ 156377 [true]    1024 @ 156654 [true]    1024 @ 158008 [true]
1024 @ 158677 [true]    1024 @ 159369 [true]    1024 @ 159996 [true]    1024 @ 160060 [true]    1024 @ 161456 [true]
1024 @ 161732 [true]    1024 @ 163269 [true]    1024 @ 163675 [true]    1024 @ 163684 [true]    1024 @ 164397 [true]
1024 @ 165077 [true]    1024 @ 166036 [true]    1024 @ 168301 [true]    1024 @ 168409 [true]    1024 @ 171499 [true]
1024 @ 171772 [true]    1024 @ 173353 [true]    1024 @ 175290 [true]    1024 @ 175573 [true]    1024 @ 177155 [true]
1024 @ 178142 [true]    1024 @ 178718 [true]    1024 @ 178822 [true]    1024 @ 179161 [true]    1024 @ 179654 [true]
1024 @ 180683 [true]    1024 @ 182432 [true]    1024 @ 183086 [true]    1024 @ 183695 [true]    1024 @ 184730 [true]
1024 @ 186884 [true]    1024 @ 187746 [true]    1024 @ 188603 [true]    1024 @ 188948 [true]    1024 @ 189124 [true]
1024 @ 190268 [true]    1024 @ 191208 [true]    1024 @ 192630 [true]    1024 @ 193617 [true]    1024 @ 195426 [true]
1024 @ 198352 [true]    1024 @ 201345 [true]    1024 @ 201416 [true]    1024 @ 203214 [true]    1024 @ 205418 [true]
1024 @ 207467 [true]    1024 @ 208763 [true]    1024 @ 208924 [true]    1024 @ 209269 [true]    1024 @ 210679 [true]
1024 @ 211622 [true]    1024 @ 212029 [true]    1024 @ 212135 [true]    1024 @ 213228 [true]    1024 @ 216151 [true]
1024 @ 216425 [true]    1024 @ 216432 [true]    1024 @ 218039 [true]    1024 @ 219445 [true]    1024 @ 219675 [true]
1024 @ 220504 [true]    1024 @ 220702 [true]    1024 @ 220716 [true]    1024 @ 222687 [true]    1024 @ 223582 [true]
1024 @ 223758 [true]    1024 @ 223917 [true]    1024 @ 224254 [true]    1024 @ 224825 [true]    1024 @ 224845 [true]
1024 @ 225372 [true]    1024 @ 226297 [true]    1024 @ 228158 [true]    1024 @ 228367 [true]    1024 @ 229494 [true]
1024 @ 229636 [true]    1024 @ 230722 [true]    1024 @ 232001 [true]    1024 @ 232693 [true]    1024 @ 234729 [true]
1024 @ 235132 [true]    1024 @ 242699 [true]    1024 @ 245103 [true]    1024 @ 245948 [true]    1024 @ 246903 [true]
1024 @ 247836 [true]    1024 @ 247871 [true]    1024 @ 248694 [true]    1024 @ 248801 [true]    1024 @ 250204 [true]
1024 @ 250899 [true]    1024 @ 250968 [true]    1024 @ 251738 [true]    1024 @ 251930 [true]    1024 @ 256221 [true]
1024 @ 258244 [true]    1024 @ 258908 [true]    1024 @ 259884 [true]    1024 @ 260318 [true]    1024 @ 260424 [true]
1024 @ 260884 [true]    1024 @ 260953 [true]
j = 257

My questions are: Is there something wrong with the way that I am employing atomicAdd? Does this happen on other Nvidia GPUs? Other 560 Ti's? Is it conceivable that my card is faulty? Can it really be possible that atomicAdd is unsafe on 560Ti's?

Thanks in advance for any help, Chris

Edited: My card must be bad. This test also fails when I replace atomicAdd with regular addition operation. (Yes, the values are no longer constant since operation not atomic, race conditions, etc. - nevertheless, there are non-zero values in places where they should be zero, no operation supposed to have been performed at those memory locations.) It also persists on a reboot, and I am ssh'ing into the reboot system on which only the login screen is running (so probably X, but no OpenGL?). System is running Ubuntu 10.04 and CUDA 4.0. GPU is GeForce GTX 560 Ti. Does anyone know if this is a common failure mode?

share|improve this question

CentOS 6.3 CUDA 5.0 GeForce 560Ti - no "false" in output.

Only the Teslas are guaranteed to work properly in GPGPU calculations. GeForce cards - not. That's why Teslas are so expensive.

Try upgrading CUDA toolkit. It may solve the problem... but I guess it's your hardware's fault.

Edit: I've noticed that you have several video cards installed. Did you check the temperatures? My friend encountered a problem with weird source: one GPU was heating PCI-slot (or something like it) of the second GPU and the second card was producing bad results.

share|improve this answer
    
After noticing that the problem occurred with or without the atomicAdd(), I replaced the 560ti I was using with another one and the problem was eliminated. So (1) it's not a problem with all 560ti's, and (2) it's not a problem with atomicAdd. I was going to look into turning down the memory clock, which I read somewhere might help, but never got around to it. In any case, it was very disturbing, since those bit flips could have been happening anywhere (in memory) for all I know. – chris Dec 12 '12 at 18:30

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