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A common assumption is that 1 / x * x == 1. What is the least positive integer that breaks this on common IEEE 754-compliant hardware?

When the assumption of a multiplicative inverse fails, poorly-written rational arithmetic ceases to work. Because many languages including C and C++ by default convert floating-point numbers to integers using round-to-zero, even a small error can cause an integral result to be off by one.

A quick test program produces various results.

#include <iostream>

int main () {
    {
        double n;
        for ( n = 2; 1 / n * n == 1; ++ n ) ;
        std::cout << n << " (" << 1 - 1/n*n << ")\n";
        for ( ; (int) ( 1 / n * n ) == 1; ++ n ) ;
        std::cout << n << " (" << 1 - 1/n*n << ")\n";
    }
    {
        float n;
        for ( n = 2; 1 / n * n == 1; ++ n ) ;
        std::cout << n << " (" << 1 - 1/n*n << ")\n";
        for ( ; (int) ( 1 / n * n ) == 1; ++ n ) ;
        std::cout << n << " (" << 1 - 1/n*n << ")\n";
    }
}

On ideone.com using GCC 4.3.4 the results are

41 (5.42101e-20)
45 (5.42101e-20)
41 (5.42101e-20)
45 (5.42101e-20)

Using GCC 4.5.1 produces the same results but the error margins are reported to be exactly zero.

On my machine (GCC 4.7.2 or Clang 4.1), the results are

49 (1.11022e-16)
49 (1.11022e-16)
41 (5.96046e-08)
41 (5.96046e-08)

This is regardless of the --fast-math option. Using -mfpmath=387 surprisingly produces

41 (5.42101e-20)
41 (5.42101e-20)
41 (5.42101e-20)
41 (5.42101e-20)

The value 5×10-20 seems to imply epsilon corresponding to a 64-bit mantissa, i.e. internal calculations using Intel 80-bit extended precision.

This seems to be highly dependent on FPU hardware. Is there a reliable value that's good for testing?

Note: I don't care what language standards or compilers guarantee about floating point number systems, although I don't think there are many meaningful guarantees in any common programming system. I'm wondering about the interaction between the numbers and real-world computers.

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It could fail as early as 1/3 * 3 since 1/3 can't be represented exactly in binary floating-point. The only way it turns out exact is if 1/3 * 3 happens to rounds towards 1 instead of 0.99999... or 1.00000001 or something. –  Mysticial Nov 26 '12 at 7:23
    
@Mysticial Could, but usually doesn't. Seems that FPUs are designed not to do that. I'm wondering what's the lowest value that reliably does fail. Or, what binary trick FPUs employ to be able to round numbers correctly up into the 40s, yet still fail at different points in that range. –  Potatoswatter Nov 26 '12 at 7:38
    
I am tempted to vote to close this question because it is not illuminating about floating-point errors or good ways to reason about floating-point operations. Asking specifically about conditions under which 1/x*x==1 fails or for which x there exists an r such that x*r==1 evaluates to true provides little insight about how floating-point works and provides little basis for predicting or controlling errors in any other situation. Additionally, the question dismisses language standards or compilers but attempts to use languages and compilers to investigate the issue experimentally. –  Eric Postpischil Nov 26 '12 at 14:12
    
Awareness of the properties of floats is pretty low; questions like this may help programmers pay more heed to the real pitfalls, which is why I upvoted it. –  Brian Drummond Nov 26 '12 at 15:24
    
@BrianDrummond: If you learn the answers to this question, how does that help with any other floating-point question? The answers we are getting are not explaining how rounding in the division and the subsequent multiplication combine to produce 1 or not 1. They are not detailing the floating-point format or how to calculate bounds on errors. There is nothing very meaningful about which x is the least integer that has this error. It is just a random question with little relevance to anything else. This is not how people who engineer floating-point computations work with floating point. –  Eric Postpischil Nov 26 '12 at 17:38

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

In double precision:

1/41 = 0x1.8f9c18f9c18fap-6, and 41*0x1.8f9c18f9c18fap-6 = 0x1.000000000000028, which rounds to 1. 1/45 = 0x1.6c16c16c16c17p-6, and 45*0x1.6c16c16c16c17p-6 = 0x1.00000000000002c, which rounds to 1.

However,

1/49 = 0x1.4e5e0a72f0539p-6, and 49*0x1.4e5e0a72f0539p-6 = 0x0.fffffffffffffa4, which rounds to 0x0.fffffffffffff8 = 0x1.fffffffffffff0p-1

49 does have a reciprocal, though! It's 0x1.4e5e0a72f053ap-6.

More generally, if f is a floating-point number in [1, 2), then f has a reciprocal. Under usual round-to-even arithmetic, a number will round to 1 if it lies in [1 - 2-54, 1 + 2-53]. Notice that the closest double, say d, to 1/f is less than 2-54 away from 1/f. If d > 1/f, then we're golden; 1 < f*d < f*(1/f+2-54) <= 1 + 2-54 * f < 1 + 2-53, so f*d rounds to 1. If d < 1/f, then f*d might round to 1 - 2-53. If it does, then f*d lies in [1 - 2-53, 1 - 2-54). If you take e = 2-53 + d, then e*f > 1 and e*f = d*f + 2-53*f < 1 - 2-53 + 2-52 = 1 + 2-53, which again rounds to 1.

EDIT: The reasoning above is wrong since the stride between two consecutive doubles is off by a factor of two. An example of a double that does not have a reciprocal is 0x1.ffffffbfffffe. 0x1.0000002000001p-1 is too small but 0x1.0000002000002p-1 is too large. The smallest example of an integer that doesn't have a reciprocal is 237. 1/237 is roughly 0x1.1485f0e0acd3B68c6Bp-8, which rounds to 0x1.1485f0e0acd58p-8. This number is too small, while the next double after it is too large.

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Interesting. Does the existence of reciprocals in [1,2) imply that all normalized numbers have exact reciprocals? (I guess that makes sense.) So what does it all mean? Is there a pattern to the precise results diverging from the representable values? –  Potatoswatter Nov 26 '12 at 7:53
    
Reciprocals don't exist for all normal floating-point numbers. But this only fails between 1p1023 and 1.fffffffffffffp1023 because the reciprocal may be subnormal. I don't really understand your second question. –  tmyklebu Nov 26 '12 at 8:12
    
OK. I mean, is it by random chance that the FPUs+compilers I tried fail at 41, 45, 49 and not higher or lower numbers? Or does d < 1/f and d rounding down become more likely as f grows, or for particular ranges of f? –  Potatoswatter Nov 26 '12 at 8:38
2  
Floating point has nothing to do with random chance. I think number-theoretic coincidence is what's going on here. That said, for 1/k to fail to be k's reciprocal requires that 1/k is rounded down, that 1/k is very close to halfway between two floating-point numbers, and that the roundoff actually makes a difference when you multiply things together. I haven't worked out what goes on with 41 and 45 (sorry; don't really care to). –  tmyklebu Nov 26 '12 at 8:49
1  
Just for fun: under the usual assumptions (IEEE 754 binary64 format, round-ties-to-even), and assuming that 1 <= n <= 2**53, the condition on n for 1.0 / n * n != 1.0 is exactly that 2**(e - 2) < 2**(e + 52) % n < n / 2, where % represents the usual remainder operation, and e is the unique integer such that 2**(e-1) <= n < 2**e. –  Mark Dickinson Nov 26 '12 at 23:15

The problem does seem to be related to C++'s choice of method for conversion to integer.

Here's an Ada version for comparison, testing 32-bit, 64-bit and 80-bit floats (just ask for 7, 15 and 18 digits, or use the builtin types for the first two).

Results and notes first, code below.

$ gnatmake fp_torture.adb
gcc -c fp_torture.adb
gnatbind -x fp_torture.ali
gnatlink fp_torture.ali
$ ./fp_torture
 41 ( 5.96046E-08)
Error representing float  2.14748E+09 as integer
 49 ( 1.11022302462516E-16)
 2147483647 ( 0.00000000000000E+00)
 41 ( 5.42101086242752217E-20)
 2147483647 ( 0.00000000000000000E+00)
$

As we can see, the floating point calculations reproduce the C++ failure points, and confirm the use of the 387 80-bit floats. But converting (a number very close to 1) back to integer, the comparison works.

Having seen this, adding proper rounding to the C++ example does allow the comparisons to work. Adding a termination condition at MAX_INT, "double n" then works.

There comes a point in "float n" when ++n fails to increment n, so the iterator stops iterating, but that's another matter!

The Ada version below creates a generic so I can instantiate it with any float type. (The exception handler is necessary because 2^31 - 1 converted to 32-bit float and back overflows...)

with Ada.Text_IO;   
use Ada.Text_IO;

procedure FP_Torture is

    generic
       type Float_Type is digits <>;
    procedure Test_FP;

    procedure Test_FP is
       F : Float_Type;
    begin
       -- for ( n = 2; 1 / n * n == 1; ++ n ) ;
       for i in 2 .. Natural'Last loop
          F := Float_Type(i);
          exit when 1.0 / F * F /= 1.0;
       end loop;
       Put_Line(natural'image(natural(F)) & " (" 
               & Float_Type'image(1.0 - (1.0 / F * F)) & ")");

       -- for ( ; (int) ( 1 / n * n ) == 1; ++ n ) ;
       for i in 1 .. Natural'Last  loop
          F := Float_Type(i);
          exit when natural(1.0 / F * F) /= 1;
       end loop;
       Put_Line(Natural'image(Natural(F)) & " (" 
               & Float_Type'image(1.0 - (1.0 / F * F)) & ")");
    exception
       when Constraint_Error => 
           Put_Line("Error representing float " & Float_Type'image(F) 
                    & " as integer");
    end;

    type Big_Float is digits 18;

    procedure Test7 is new Test_FP(Float);
    procedure Test15 is new Test_FP(Long_Float);
    procedure Test18 is new Test_FP(Big_Float);

begin
    Test7;
    Test15;
    Test18;
end FP_Torture;
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