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I have a TextBox and a Button in my view.

Now I am checking a condition upon button click and if the condition turns out to be false, displaying the message to the user, and then I have to set the cursor to the text box control.

if (companyref == null)
{
Lipper.Nelson.AdminClient.Main.Views.ContactPanels.CompanyAssociation cs = new Lipper.Nelson.AdminClient.Main.Views.ContactPanels.CompanyAssociation(); 

MessageBox.Show("Company does not exist.", "Error", MessageBoxButton.OK,
                    MessageBoxImage.Exclamation);

    cs.txtCompanyID.Focusable = true;

    System.Windows.Input.Keyboard.Focus(cs.txtCompanyID);

}

The above code is in the view model.

The CompanyAssociation is the view name.

But the cursor is not getting set in the TextBox.

The xaml is as under

<igEditors:XamTextEditor KeyDown="xamTextEditorAllowOnlyNumeric_KeyDown" 
  Name="txtCompanyID" ValueChanged="txtCompanyID_ValueChanged"  Text="{Binding 
  Company.CompanyId, Mode=TwoWay, UpdateSourceTrigger=PropertyChanged}" Width="{Binding 
  ActualWidth, ElementName=border}" Grid.Column="1" Grid.Row="0" 
  VerticalAlignment="Top" Margin="0,5,0,0" HorizontalAlignment="Stretch"
  IsEnabled="{Binding Path=IsEditable}" />

<Button Template="{StaticResource buttonTemp1}" Command="{Binding ContactCommand}" 
  CommandParameter="searchCompany" Content="Search"  Width="80"  Grid.Column="2" 
  Grid.Row="0" VerticalAlignment="Top" Margin="0" HorizontalAlignment="Left"  
  IsEnabled="{Binding Path=IsEditable}" />

Please help

share|improve this question

14 Answers 14

up vote 130 down vote accepted

Let me answer to your question in three parts.

  1. I'm wondering what is "cs.txtCompanyID" in your example? Is it a TextBox control? If yes, then you are on a wrong way. Generally speaking it's not a good idea to have any reference to UI in your ViewModel. You can ask "Why?" but this is another question to post on Stackoverflow :).

  2. The best way to track down issues with Focus is... debugging .Net source code. No kidding. It saved me a lot of time many times. To enable .net source code debugging refer to Shawn Bruke's blog.

  3. Finally, general approach that I use to set focus from ViewModel is Attached Properties. I wrote very simple attached property, which can be set on any UIElement. And it can be bound to ViewModel's property "IsFocused" for example. Here it is:

    public static class FocusExtension
    {
     public static bool GetIsFocused(DependencyObject obj)
    {
    	return (bool)obj.GetValue(IsFocusedProperty);
    }
    
    
     public static void SetIsFocused(DependencyObject obj, bool value)
     {
    	 obj.SetValue(IsFocusedProperty, value);
     }
    
    
     public static readonly DependencyProperty IsFocusedProperty =
    	 DependencyProperty.RegisterAttached(
    	  "IsFocused", typeof(bool),  typeof(FocusExtension),
    	  new UIPropertyMetadata(false, OnIsFocusedPropertyChanged));
    
    
     private static void OnIsFocusedPropertyChanged(DependencyObject d,
    	 DependencyPropertyChangedEventArgs e)
     {
    	 var uie = (UIElement) d;
    	 if ((bool)e.NewValue)
    	 {
    		 uie.Focus(); // Don't care about false values.
    	 }
     }
    }
    

Now in your View (in XAML) you can bind this property to your ViewModel:

<TextBox local:FocusExtension.IsFocused="{Binding IsUserNameFocused}" />

Hope this helps :). If it doesn't refer to the answer #2.

Cheers.

share|improve this answer
1  
+1, attached properties are the way to go here ! –  Thomas Levesque Aug 31 '09 at 15:06
5  
Cool idea. I need to set IsUserNameFocused to true, then false again to get this working, is this right? –  Sam Apr 19 '10 at 14:19
    
Thank you Sam. It depends. Sometimes it's enough to set it to true only once. –  Anvaka Apr 21 '10 at 10:45
6  
You should also call Keyboard.Focus(uie); from your OnIsFocusedPropertyChanged event if you want your control to receive Keyboard Focus as well as Logical Focus –  Rachel Oct 10 '11 at 18:14
1  
How is this supposed to be used? If I set my property to true, the control is focused. But it will always be focused again when I come back to this view. Resetting it from OnIsFocusedPropertyChanged doesn't change this. Resetting it directly after setting it from the ViewModel does not focus anything anymore. It doesn't work. What have those 70 upvoters done exactly? –  LonelyPixel Feb 26 '13 at 23:02

I know this question has been answered a thousand times over by now, but I made some edits to Anvaka's contribution that I think will help others that had similar issues that I had.

Firstly, I changed the above Attached Property like so:

public static class FocusExtension
{
    public static readonly DependencyProperty IsFocusedProperty = 
        DependencyProperty.RegisterAttached("IsFocused", typeof(bool?), typeof(FocusExtension), new FrameworkPropertyMetadata(IsFocusedChanged));

    public static bool? GetIsFocused(DependencyObject element)
    {
        if (element == null)
        {
            throw new ArgumentNullException("element");
        }

        return (bool?)element.GetValue(IsFocusedProperty);
    }

    public static void SetIsFocused(DependencyObject element, bool? value)
    {
        if (element == null)
        {
            throw new ArgumentNullException("element");
        }

        element.SetValue(IsFocusedProperty, value);
    }

    private static void IsFocusedChanged(DependencyObject d, DependencyPropertyChangedEventArgs e)
    {
        var fe = (FrameworkElement)d;

        if (e.OldValue == null)
        {
            fe.GotFocus += FrameworkElement_GotFocus;
            fe.LostFocus += FrameworkElement_LostFocus;
        }

        if (!fe.IsVisible)
        {
            fe.IsVisibleChanged += new DependencyPropertyChangedEventHandler(fe_IsVisibleChanged);
        }

        if ((bool)e.NewValue)
        {
            fe.Focus();
        }
    }

    private static void fe_IsVisibleChanged(object sender, DependencyPropertyChangedEventArgs e)
    {
        var fe = (FrameworkElement)sender;
        if (fe.IsVisible && (bool)((FrameworkElement)sender).GetValue(IsFocusedProperty))
        {
            fe.IsVisibleChanged -= fe_IsVisibleChanged;
            fe.Focus();
        }
    }

    private static void FrameworkElement_GotFocus(object sender, RoutedEventArgs e)
    {
        ((FrameworkElement)sender).SetValue(IsFocusedProperty, true);
    }

    private static void FrameworkElement_LostFocus(object sender, RoutedEventArgs e)
    {
        ((FrameworkElement)sender).SetValue(IsFocusedProperty, false);
    }
}

My reason for adding the visibility references were tabs. Apparently if you used the attached property on any other tab outside of the initially visible tab, the attached property didn't work until you manually focused the control.

The other obstacle was creating a more elegant way of resetting the underlying property to false when it lost focus. That's where the lost focus events came in along with making sure to set the binding in the xaml to twoway mode.

<TextBox            
    Text="{Binding Description}"
    FocusExtension.IsFocused="{Binding IsFocused, Mode=TwoWay}"/>

If there's a better way to handle the visibility issue, please let me know.

share|improve this answer
3  
This works well for me except I need to add a "if (e.Source == e.OriginalSource)" check in the GotFocus/LostFocus or else it stackoverflows (literally) when used on my UserControl, which does redirect the focus to inner component. I removed the Visible checks, accepting the fact that it works just like .Focus() method. If .Focus() doesn't work, the binding shouldn't work - and that's ok for my scenario. –  HelloSam Mar 22 '13 at 20:08
    
this works great :) –  Mussammil Feb 9 at 14:15
    
YOU ABSOLUTE GENIUS. Spent a whole day on this. Thanks!! I have been trying to find a way to focus an element and hide it when it doesn't have focus. But this really screws up the dependency properties. This solution worked for me. –  Asheh Nov 27 at 18:14

I think the best way is to keep the MVVM principle clean, so basically you must use the Messenger Class provided with the MVVM Light and here is how to use it:

in your viewmodel(exampleViewModel.cs):write the following

 Messenger.Default.Send<string>("focus", "DoFocus");

now in your View.cs(not the XAML the view.xaml.cs) write the following in the constructor

 public MyView()
        {
            InitializeComponent();

            Messenger.Default.Register<string>(this, "DoFocus", doFocus);
        }
        public void doFocus(string msg)
        {
            if (msg == "focus")
                this.txtcode.Focus();
        }

that method owrks just fine and with less code and maintaining MVVM standards

share|improve this answer
    
i like this solution.. thanks –  ensecoz Mar 3 '12 at 9:39
3  
Well if you want to keep the MVVM principle clean, you wouldn't be writing code in your code behind in the first place. I believe the attached property approach is much cleaner. It doesn't introduce a lot of magic strings in your view model as well. –  Ε Г И І И О Mar 15 '12 at 21:15
15  
El Nino: Where exactly did you get the idea there shouldn't be anything in your view code-behind? Anything that is UI-related should be in the view's code-behind. Setting focus of UI elements should Definitely be in the view's code-behind. Let the viewmodel figure out when to send the message; let the view figure out what to do with the message. That is what M-V-VM does: separates the concerns of data model, business logic, and UI. –  Kyle Hale Feb 19 '13 at 5:00
    
I like this solution too! No complications. Thank you! –  Vicente Hernández Jun 11 '13 at 4:07
    
It works on WP8 and I also like the solution :), thanks. –  Hoang Tran Aug 23 '13 at 8:16

None of these worked for me exactly, but for the benefit of others, this is what I ended up writing based on some of the code already provided here.

Usage would be as follows:

<TextBox ... h:FocusBehavior.IsFocused="True"/>

And the implementation would be as follows:

/// <summary>
/// Behavior allowing to put focus on element from the view model in a MVVM implementation.
/// </summary>
public static class FocusBehavior
{
    #region Dependency Properties
    /// <summary>
    /// <c>IsFocused</c> dependency property.
    /// </summary>
    public static readonly DependencyProperty IsFocusedProperty =
        DependencyProperty.RegisterAttached("IsFocused", typeof(bool?),
            typeof(FocusBehavior), new FrameworkPropertyMetadata(IsFocusedChanged));
    /// <summary>
    /// Gets the <c>IsFocused</c> property value.
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="element">The element.</param>
    /// <returns>Value of the <c>IsFocused</c> property or <c>null</c> if not set.</returns>
    public static bool? GetIsFocused(DependencyObject element)
    {
        if (element == null)
        {
            throw new ArgumentNullException("element");
        }
        return (bool?)element.GetValue(IsFocusedProperty);
    }
    /// <summary>
    /// Sets the <c>IsFocused</c> property value.
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="element">The element.</param>
    /// <param name="value">The value.</param>
    public static void SetIsFocused(DependencyObject element, bool? value)
    {
        if (element == null)
        {
            throw new ArgumentNullException("element");
        }
        element.SetValue(IsFocusedProperty, value);
    }
    #endregion Dependency Properties

    #region Event Handlers
    /// <summary>
    /// Determines whether the value of the dependency property <c>IsFocused</c> has change.
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="d">The dependency object.</param>
    /// <param name="e">The <see cref="System.Windows.DependencyPropertyChangedEventArgs"/> instance containing the event data.</param>
    private static void IsFocusedChanged(DependencyObject d, DependencyPropertyChangedEventArgs e)
    {
        // Ensure it is a FrameworkElement instance.
        var fe = d as FrameworkElement;
        if (fe != null && e.OldValue == null && e.NewValue != null && (bool)e.NewValue)
        {
            // Attach to the Loaded event to set the focus there. If we do it here it will
            // be overridden by the view rendering the framework element.
            fe.Loaded += FrameworkElementLoaded;
        }
    }
    /// <summary>
    /// Sets the focus when the framework element is loaded and ready to receive input.
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="sender">The sender.</param>
    /// <param name="e">The <see cref="System.Windows.RoutedEventArgs"/> instance containing the event data.</param>
    private static void FrameworkElementLoaded(object sender, RoutedEventArgs e)
    {
        // Ensure it is a FrameworkElement instance.
        var fe = sender as FrameworkElement;
        if (fe != null)
        {
            // Remove the event handler registration.
            fe.Loaded -= FrameworkElementLoaded;
            // Set the focus to the given framework element.
            fe.Focus();
            // Determine if it is a text box like element.
            var tb = fe as TextBoxBase;
            if (tb != null)
            {
                // Select all text to be ready for replacement.
                tb.SelectAll();
            }
        }
    }
    #endregion Event Handlers
}
share|improve this answer

The problem is that once the IsUserNameFocused is set to true, it will never be false. This solves it by handling the GotFocus and LostFocus for the FrameworkElement.

I was having trouble with the source code formatting so here is a link

share|improve this answer
    
I chhanged "object fe = (FrameworkElement)d;" to "FrameworkElement fe = (FrameworkElement)d;" so the intellisense works –  Darren Jan 29 '13 at 14:15
    
Still doesn't solve the problem. The element stays focused every time I come back to it. –  LonelyPixel Feb 26 '13 at 23:11

For those trying to use Anvaka's solution above, I was having issues with the binding only working the first time, as lostfocus would not update the property to false. You can manually set the property to false and then true every time, but a better solution could be to do something like this in your property:

bool _isFocused = false;
    public bool IsFocused 
    {
        get { return _isFocused ; }
        set
        {
            _isFocused = false;
            _isFocused = value;
            base.OnPropertyChanged("IsFocused ");
        }
    }

This way you only ever need to set it to true, and it will get focus.

share|improve this answer
    
Why have you a if statement? the _isFocused once set to false will just be changed to value on the next line. –  Damien McGivern Oct 7 '11 at 9:13
    
I missed that, thank you. I updated my answer –  Tyrsius Oct 7 '11 at 15:24
1  
@Tyrsius You can round this issue by getting the dependency property to Coerce, see here- social.msdn.microsoft.com/Forums/en-US/wpf/thread/… –  RichardOD Feb 17 '12 at 15:20
    
@RichardOD I'd not heard of this before, thank you –  Tyrsius Feb 17 '12 at 16:15
    
@Tyrsius, no worries. I think I discovered it myself by accident –  RichardOD Feb 18 '12 at 14:17

In my case, the FocusExtension didn't work until I change the method OnIsFocusedPropertyChanged. The original one was working only in debug when a break point stopped the process. At runtime, the process is too quick and nothing happend. With this little modification and the help of our friend Task, this is working fine in both scenarios.

private static void OnIsFocusedPropertyChanged(DependencyObject d, DependencyPropertyChangedEventArgs e)
{
  var uie = (UIElement)d;
  if ((bool)e.NewValue)
  {
    var action = new Action(() => uie.Dispatcher.BeginInvoke((Action)(() => uie.Focus())));
    Task.Factory.StartNew(action);
  }
}
share|improve this answer

Anvakas brilliant code is for Windows Desktop applications. If you are like me and needed the same solution for Windows Store apps this code might be handy:

public static class FocusExtension
{
    public static bool GetIsFocused(DependencyObject obj)
    {
        return (bool)obj.GetValue(IsFocusedProperty);
    }


    public static void SetIsFocused(DependencyObject obj, bool value)
    {
        obj.SetValue(IsFocusedProperty, value);
    }


    public static readonly DependencyProperty IsFocusedProperty =
        DependencyProperty.RegisterAttached(
         "IsFocused", typeof(bool), typeof(FocusExtension),
         new PropertyMetadata(false, OnIsFocusedPropertyChanged));


    private static void OnIsFocusedPropertyChanged(DependencyObject d,
        DependencyPropertyChangedEventArgs e)
    {
        if ((bool)e.NewValue)
        {
            var uie = d as Windows.UI.Xaml.Controls.Control;

            if( uie != null )
            {
                uie.Focus(FocusState.Programmatic);
            }
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer

I found Crucial's solution to the IsVisible problem very useful. It didn't completely solve my problem, but some extra code following the same pattern for the IsEnabled pattern did.

To the IsFocusedChanged method I added:

    if (!fe.IsEnabled)
    {
        fe.IsEnabledChanged += fe_IsEnabledChanged;
    }

And here's the handler:

private static void fe_IsEnabledChanged(object sender, DependencyPropertyChangedEventArgs e)
{
    var fe = (FrameworkElement)sender;
    if (fe.IsEnabled && (bool)((FrameworkElement)sender).GetValue(IsFocusedProperty))
    {
        fe.IsEnabledChanged -= fe_IsEnabledChanged;
        fe.Focus();
    }
}
share|improve this answer

For Silverlight:

using System.Windows;
using System.Windows.Controls;
using System.Windows.Interactivity;

namespace MyProject.Behaviors
{
    public class FocusBehavior : Behavior<Control>
    {
        protected override void OnAttached()
        {
            this.AssociatedObject.Loaded += AssociatedObject_Loaded;
            base.OnAttached();
        }

        private void AssociatedObject_Loaded(object sender, RoutedEventArgs e)
        {
            this.AssociatedObject.Loaded -= AssociatedObject_Loaded;
            if (this.HasInitialFocus || this.IsFocused)
            {
                this.GotFocus();
            }
        }

        private void GotFocus()
        {
            this.AssociatedObject.Focus();
            if (this.IsSelectAll)
            {
                if (this.AssociatedObject is TextBox)
                {
                    (this.AssociatedObject as TextBox).SelectAll();
                }
                else if (this.AssociatedObject is PasswordBox)
                {
                    (this.AssociatedObject as PasswordBox).SelectAll();
                }
                else if (this.AssociatedObject is RichTextBox)
                {
                    (this.AssociatedObject as RichTextBox).SelectAll();
                }
            }
        }

        public static readonly DependencyProperty IsFocusedProperty =
            DependencyProperty.Register(
                "IsFocused",
                typeof(bool),
                typeof(FocusBehavior),
                new PropertyMetadata(false, 
                    (d, e) => 
                    {
                        if ((bool)e.NewValue)
                        {
                            ((FocusBehavior)d).GotFocus();
                        }
                    }));

        public bool IsFocused
        {
            get { return (bool)GetValue(IsFocusedProperty); }
            set { SetValue(IsFocusedProperty, value); }
        }

        public static readonly DependencyProperty HasInitialFocusProperty =
            DependencyProperty.Register(
                "HasInitialFocus",
                typeof(bool),
                typeof(FocusBehavior),
                new PropertyMetadata(false, null));

        public bool HasInitialFocus
        {
            get { return (bool)GetValue(HasInitialFocusProperty); }
            set { SetValue(HasInitialFocusProperty, value); }
        }

        public static readonly DependencyProperty IsSelectAllProperty =
            DependencyProperty.Register(
                "IsSelectAll",
                typeof(bool),
                typeof(FocusBehavior),
                new PropertyMetadata(false, null));

        public bool IsSelectAll
        {
            get { return (bool)GetValue(IsSelectAllProperty); }
            set { SetValue(IsSelectAllProperty, value); }
        }

    }
}

LoginViewModel.cs:

    public class LoginModel : ViewModelBase
    {
        ....

        private bool _EmailFocus = false;
        public bool EmailFocus
        {
            get
            {
                return _EmailFocus;
            }
            set
            {
                if (value)
                {
                    _EmailFocus = false;
                    RaisePropertyChanged("EmailFocus");
                }
                _EmailFocus = value;
                RaisePropertyChanged("EmailFocus");
            }
        }
       ...
   }

Login.xaml:

xmlns:i="http://schemas.microsoft.com/expression/2010/interactivity"
xmlns:beh="clr-namespace:MyProject.Behaviors"

<TextBox Text="{Binding Email, Mode=TwoWay, UpdateSourceTrigger=PropertyChanged}">
    <i:Interaction.Behaviors>
        <beh:FocusBehavior IsFocused="{Binding EmailFocus}" IsSelectAll="True"/>
    </i:Interaction.Behaviors>
</TextBox>

OR

<TextBox Text="{Binding Email, Mode=TwoWay, UpdateSourceTrigger=PropertyChanged}">
    <i:Interaction.Behaviors>
        <beh:FocusBehavior HasInitialFocus="True" IsSelectAll="True"/>
    </i:Interaction.Behaviors>
</TextBox>

To set the focus should just do it in code:

EmailFocus = true;

Remember that this plugin is part of an html page, so other controls in the page might have the focus

if (!Application.Current.IsRunningOutOfBrowser)
{
    System.Windows.Browser.HtmlPage.Plugin.Focus();
}
share|improve this answer

You could use the ViewCommand design pattern. It describes a method for the MVVM design pattern to control a View from a ViewModel with commands.

I've implemented it based on King A.Majid's suggestion to use the MVVM Light Messenger class. The ViewCommandManager class handles invoking commands in connected views. It's basically the other direction of regular Commands, for these cases when a ViewModel needs to do some action in its View. It uses reflection like data-bound commands and WeakReferences to avoid memory leaks.

http://dev.unclassified.de/source/viewcommand (also published on CodeProject)

share|improve this answer

I have found solution by editing code as per following. There is no need to set Binding property first False then True.

public static class FocusExtension
{

    public static bool GetIsFocused(DependencyObject obj)
    {
        return (bool)obj.GetValue(IsFocusedProperty);
    }


    public static void SetIsFocused(DependencyObject obj, bool value)
    {
        obj.SetValue(IsFocusedProperty, value);
    }


    public static readonly DependencyProperty IsFocusedProperty =
        DependencyProperty.RegisterAttached(
         "IsFocused", typeof(bool), typeof(FocusExtension),
         new UIPropertyMetadata(false, OnIsFocusedPropertyChanged));


    private static void OnIsFocusedPropertyChanged(DependencyObject d, DependencyPropertyChangedEventArgs e)
    {
        if (d != null && d is Control)
        {
            var _Control = d as Control;
            if ((bool)e.NewValue)
            {
                // To set false value to get focus on control. if we don't set value to False then we have to set all binding
                //property to first False then True to set focus on control.
                OnLostFocus(_Control, null);
                _Control.Focus(); // Don't care about false values.
            }
        }
    }

    private static void OnLostFocus(object sender, RoutedEventArgs e)
    {
        if (sender != null && sender is Control)
        {
            (sender as Control).SetValue(IsFocusedProperty, false);
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer

I use WPF / Caliburn Micro a found that "dfaivre" has made a general and workable solution here: http://caliburnmicro.codeplex.com/discussions/222892

share|improve this answer
System.Windows.Forms.Application.DoEvents();
Keyboard.Focus(tbxLastName);
share|improve this answer
    
OP is using WPF. Focus code for WinForms is not going to help. –  Josh G Jun 8 '11 at 19:44

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