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How it is possible to find X, Y, X' and Y', where these are unknown 2x2 matrices and A,B,C,I,J,K and L are known 2x2 matrices.

Equations are:

A . X . Y . B = I
A . X . Y' . B = J
A . X . Y . C . X' . Y' . B = K
A . X' . Y' . B = L

Equations can be generated to simplify problem by keeping 2 unknowns between A and B.

Seems realistic because problem contains 4 Equations and 4 Unknowns.

Please anyone can help? Thanks

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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

My approach uses the first and the fourth equation: (assuming that matrices A, B, Y can be inverted)

   A . X . Y . B = I                  (1)
   A . X . Y' . B = J                 (2)
   A . X . Y . C . X' . Y' . B = K    (3)
   A . X' . Y' . B = L                (4)

(1)=>  X . Y = Inv(A) . I . Inv(B) = M    (5)   (introducing abbreviation M)
(4)=>  X'. Y'= Inv(A) . L . Inv(B) = N'   (6)   (introducing abbreviation N')
(6)=>  Y . X = N                          (7)
(5)=>  X = M . Inv(Y)                     (8)   Inv(Y) is the inverse matrix of Y
(7)=>  X = Inv(Y) . N                     (9)
(9)=>  M . Inv(Y) = Inv(Y) . N            (10)
(10)=> Y . M = N . Y                      (11)
(11)=> (y11*m11+y12*m21) = (n11*y11+n12*y21)  (12)  matrix components have to be equal
(11)=> (y11*m21+y12*m22) = (n11*y21+n12*y22)  (13)
(11)=> (y21*m11+y22*m21) = (n21*y11+n22*y21)  (14)
(11)=> (y21*m12*y22*m22) = (n21*y12+n22*y22)  (15)
(12)=> y11*(m11-n11) +y12*m21 -y21*n12                      = 0   (16)
(13)=> y11*m21       +y12*m22 -y21*n11       -y22*n12       = 0   (17)
(14)=> y11*(-n21)             +y21*(m11-n22) +y22*m21       = 0   (18)
(15)=>               +y12*n21 +y21*m12       +y22*(m22-n22) = 0   (19)

Solution of equations (16)-(19) can be found via Gaussian elimination. From Y, calculate X via (8)

The resulting solution - if the set of linear equations (16)-(19) has a solution - is not unique. X and Y can be modified by multiplication with a scaling factor.

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I don't think it's possible. From the first equation, you can calculate X.Y. From the last, you can calculate X'.Y'. The third doesn't give any new information.

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Actually, goal was to find only X and Y keeping first equation in hand. So it was unrealistic to find two unknown matrices with one equation. For that purpose new equations are introduced to make unknowns and knowns equal. –  Salman Nov 26 '12 at 8:07
    
How i can calculare X and Y from 1st equation? As they are separate matrices –  Salman Nov 26 '12 at 8:09
    
As I said: it's not possible. You can't calculate X and Yindividually from the first equation. You can only calculate their product XY. –  Henrik Nov 26 '12 at 8:11
    
And you cannot calculate the four matrices from the given equations. You really only have three equations. The third either follows from the first and the last, or it contradicts them. –  Henrik Nov 26 '12 at 8:13
    
What about A . X' . Y . B = M –  Salman Nov 26 '12 at 8:16

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