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So far, I've been using a KeyedCollection to create a large collection of objects (close to 1 million), each of which has a uint ID field as the collection's key. That's been great, but now I'm running into a problem as I expand the functionality: I have "override" records and need to replace any existing item with the same key by the new item. On average, perhaps 1 in 20 records might be overridden, conceivably even multiple times for the same record.

I don't mind refactoring away from a KeyedCollection if necessary. What's my best bet? Dictionary<>? The ids are not sequential, so straight indexing is out.

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Use Dictionary; why/how are you using KeyedCollection in the first place? – jeroenh Nov 26 '12 at 8:14
    
KeyedCollection is recommended as the way to go for modelling objects that have a built-in key, so that's what I went with. I'd never run into a situation of having to replace existing records until now and wasn't aware that it was a bit limited in that regard. – RobinHood70 Nov 26 '12 at 8:18
    
Wait...I can just do a Remove/Add the same as I would with a Dictionary, can't I? Maybe I don't need to move away from KeyedCollection after all. – RobinHood70 Nov 26 '12 at 8:27
    
Maybe this is what you need: msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms132449.aspx – jeroenh Nov 26 '12 at 8:27
    
It's the entire record that's changing, not just the key. I'd been trying to change it via the indexer, which is prohibited, stupidly ignoring the Remove/Add option. D'oh! – RobinHood70 Nov 26 '12 at 8:31
up vote 2 down vote accepted

As with Dictionary you should remove the item from the collection, alter/replace it and add it again.

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Thanks for the confirmation! It's been a long day and I wasn't thinking straight. :-/ – RobinHood70 Nov 26 '12 at 8:34
    
Just to be 100% sure, what you're saying is that I should do this? base.Remove(GetKeyForItem(anObject)); base.Add(anObject); – RenniePet Jan 21 '14 at 14:49
    
@RenniePet: No. You should do base.Remove(GetKeyForItem(desiredObject)); ChangeState(desiredObject); base.Add(desiredObject);. First you have to remove the object with its old hash code. Than manipulate it (this leads to a change in the hash code) and than re-add it again (with the new hash code). – Oliver Jan 23 '14 at 7:26
    
Thanks for responding. In my bit of code "anObject" completely replaces the previous object with the same key, so I guess in that case my bit of code is OK, right? – RenniePet Jan 23 '14 at 12:12

This is an old question, and I've previously made use of the existing answer myself. But in playing around with KeyedCollection<> once again I've become aware that the Remove-and-then-Add technique is less efficient than the technique I've now implemented. The problem is that the Remove() method searches the List linearly and then moves the rest of the list one entry to the left. The technique I present here also searches the List linearly, but at least it avoids shifting the rest of the List.

NB. This is only applicable when the replacement item has the same key as the item it is to replace.

   /// <summary>
   /// Derived (but still abstract) version of KeyedCollection{} to provide a couple of extra 
   /// services, in particular AddOrReplace() and Replace() methods.
   /// </summary>
   public abstract class KeyedList<TKey, TItem> : KeyedCollection<TKey, TItem>
   {
      /// <summary>
      /// Property to provide access to the "hidden" List{} in the base class.
      /// </summary>
      public List<TItem> BaseList
      {
         get { return base.Items as List<TItem>; }
      }


      /// <summary>
      /// Method to add a new object to the collection, or to replace an existing one if there is 
      /// already an object with the same key in the collection.
      /// </summary>
      public void AddOrReplace(TItem newObject)
      {
         int i = GetItemIndex(newObject);
         if (i != -1)
            base.SetItem(i, newObject);
         else
            base.Add(newObject);
      }


      /// <summary>
      /// Method to replace an existing object in the collection, i.e., an object with the same key. 
      /// An exception is thrown if there is no existing object with the same key.
      /// </summary>
      public void Replace(TItem newObject)
      {
         int i = GetItemIndex(newObject);
         if (i != -1)
            base.SetItem(i, newObject);
         else
            throw new Exception("Object to be replaced not found in collection.");
      }


      /// <summary>
      /// Method to get the index into the List{} in the base collection for an item that may or may 
      /// not be in the collection. Returns -1 if not found.
      /// </summary>
      private int GetItemIndex(TItem itemToFind)
      {
         TKey keyToFind = GetKeyForItem(itemToFind);
         return BaseList.FindIndex((TItem existingItem) => 
                                   GetKeyForItem(existingItem).Equals(keyToFind));
      }
   }
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What about using the IndexOf method of KeyedCollection to retrieve the index of a TItem? – Erwin Mayer Aug 24 '15 at 12:56
    
@ErwinMayer Sorry, I don't see how that would be applicable. Wouldn't that require that you still had the object to be replaced available to use as a second argument to a modified AddOrReplace() method, so it becomes AddOrReplace(TItem oldObject, TItem newObject)? If that is the case, then yes, your idea is probably more efficient. But in my usage I don't have the object to be replaced available - I just want to "blindly" replace it with the new object. – RenniePet Aug 25 '15 at 3:59
    
Indeed, in my implementation I had access to the old key. However I also noticed that IndexOf is O(n), so probably not even more efficient than your implementation. – Erwin Mayer Aug 25 '15 at 5:25
    
@ErwinMayer Wait a minute, I think you may be on to something after all. The AddOrReplace() method could first use the built-in Dictionary to see if there was a previous object or not. If there was, then use your suggestion of using IndexOf to find it in the built-in List, and then both swap the entry in the List and update the entry in the Dictionary! If that's possible, then it should be faster than my method, since it avoids calling GetKeyForItem(existingItem) for every non-matching object until it finds the matching object. – RenniePet Aug 25 '15 at 14:23
    
Indeed this cannot harm :) – Erwin Mayer Aug 25 '15 at 14:27

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