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I had implemented a asynchronous thread by a singleton class in which a queue is present to which i add logging object. But it is giving no such element exception at java.util.linkedlist.remove

public class LogDaoSingleton extends Thread {

private static LogDaoSingleton logDaoSingleton = new LogDaoSingleton();

private static Queue<ScoreLoggingObject> queue = new LinkedList<ScoreLoggingObject>();

private static Boolean firstTime = true;


private LogDAO logDAO;
private SkipLogDaoImpl skipLogDAO;

Connection conNull = null;
Connection connection = null;

private int counter = 0;

Connection con = null;

Connection skipCon = null;

public static LogDaoSingleton getInstance() {
    return logDaoSingleton;
}

private static void createInstance() {
    logDaoSingleton = new LogDaoSingleton();
}

private LogDaoSingleton() {
    try {
        con = HMDBUtil.getNonTxNullProdConnection();
        conNull = HMDBUtil.getNonTxNullProdConnection();
        skipCon = HMDBUtil.getNonTxNullProdConnection();
        logDAO = new LogDAOImpl();
        skipLogDAO = new SkipLogDaoImpl();
        hmCandScoreLog = PropertyReader.getStringProperty(
                CacheConstants.CLUSTER_REPORT,
                CacheConstants.HM_CAND_SCORE_LOG);
        hmCandScoreLogNull = PropertyReader.getStringProperty(
                CacheConstants.CLUSTER_REPORT,
                CacheConstants.HM_CAND_SCORE_LOG_NULL);
    } catch (HMCISException e) {
        e.printStackTrace();
    }
}

public static void addtoQueue(ScoreLoggingObject scoringObject) {
    queue.add(scoringObject);
    if (firstTime) {
        synchronized (firstTime) {
            if (firstTime) {
                createInstance();
                logDaoSingleton.setDaemon(false);
                logDaoSingleton.start();
                firstTime = false;
            }
        }
    }
}

public void run() {
    try {
        while (true) {
            try {
                if (null != queue && queue.size() > 0) {
                    logData(queue.poll());
                } else {
                    try {
                        Thread.sleep(2 * 60 * 1000);
                    } catch (InterruptedException e) {
                        e.printStackTrace();
                    }
                }
            } catch (Exception e) {
                // Do nothing.
            }
        }
    } catch (Throwable e) {
        firstTime = true;
    }
}

private void logData(ScoreLoggingObject scoreLoggingObject) {

    }
}

}

Error is at logData(queue.poll());

share|improve this question
2  
provide full stack trace if possible – developer Nov 26 '12 at 8:34
1  
where is that remove? what does logData do ? – auselen Nov 26 '12 at 8:42
    
please show how you create the thread + singleton. Is this queue used anywhere else by other threads ? What is the type of the queue ? – giorashc Nov 26 '12 at 8:47

There are at least three problems in this method:

public static void addtoQueue(ScoreLoggingObject scoringObject) {
    queue.add(scoringObject);
    if (firstTime) {
        synchronized (firstTime) {
            if (firstTime) {
                createInstance();
                logDaoSingleton.setDaemon(false);
                logDaoSingleton.start();
                firstTime = false;
            }
        }
    }
}

Namely

  1. That you are adding to a LinkedList without a lock. LinkedList is not a concurrency safe collection. Try ConcurrentSkipLinkedList as a better collection.

  2. You are reading firstTime using double-checked locking... which can have side-effects that you might not believe... Go take a look at "Java Concurrency in Practice" specifically the Yuck-face listing on page 32. Try to predict what that program will output before reading the book. Then read the explanation. Unfortunately I am going to have to spoil the impact of that example for you now when I point out that the JVM is entitled to reorder operations in between synchronization points. So the result is that the operations within your synchronized block can be implemented in any order... for example they could happen in the following order (likely not, but a JVM implementation will still be valid if it did it in this order)

        synchronized (firstTime) {
            if (firstTime) {
                firstTime = false;
                createInstance();
                logDaoSingleton.setDaemon(false);
                logDaoSingleton.start();
            }
        }
    

    What would happen if there is an exception thrown in your createInstance() method?

    If it were me, I would fix that by making firstTime a volatile that would force the JVM to respect the ordering (though you would still need the double-check!)

  3. firstTime is a Boolean initialized by auto-boxing, which for Boolean uses pooled instances, so your double-checked lock is actually synchronized (Boolean.TRUE) and not synchronized (firstTime). Additionally it is bad form to synchronize on a non-final field, as it almost never does what you want it to do. You probably want to just make the addToQueue method synchronized until you know you have a problem.

TL;DR you are trying to be 'clever' with locking... always a bad plan... especially before you know that you need to be clever. Write the simplest thing that could possibly work, then get on with the rest of the problems. Then see where the performance issues are... ONLY THEN should you worry about locking in this class.

share|improve this answer
    
++1 'Boolean initialized by auto-boxing == Boolean.TRUE' – maasg Nov 26 '12 at 11:07
    
Hi Stephen I want to know why is i am getting "no such element exception at java.util.linkedlist.remove" one scenario may be we are trying to remove from empty List – Abhij Nov 26 '12 at 12:50
    
Point 1. The add is to an collection that does not support concurrency and you are making that call outside of a synchronized block. LinkedList maintains a size field as a counter for the number of elements because linked lists are slow to traverse and List.size() is a common method to call. The JVM can reorder operations in between synchronization points, and therefore size can be incremented before the item is added as there are no synchronization points in play. Further poll() calls remove() who's last but one statement is size-- so two threads can see the size as non-zero – Stephen Connolly Nov 26 '12 at 13:28
    
But the most likely issue is that the size field is in a different cache line from the nodes, so therefore one core sees the update to size but doesn't see the update to the node entry in its cache. TL;DR you need a synchronization point (i.e. access a volatile, or use a lock). – Stephen Connolly Nov 26 '12 at 13:29

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