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    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        string x = string.Empty;
        Task t = new Task(() => {
            x = "dd";
        });
        Task<int> cT = t.ContinueWith<int>(gg => {
            return 23;
        });


        t.Start();
        Console.WriteLine(cT.Result);
        Console.ReadLine();
    }

The Result:23. Yes,i want it. so,i can say all task has parent task in c#,that is right?

share|improve this question

t doesn't have a parent task, so no: you can't say that "all task has parent task". Those that are continuations will have a parent task.

share|improve this answer
    
He has basically reassigned cT to t - making both reference the same task. – Killercam Nov 26 '12 at 9:04
1  
@Killercam well, now quite; not least, cT and t are different types. There are two distinct tasks here. There is no result from the first task. – Marc Gravell Nov 26 '12 at 9:05
    
Ahhh, yes. Thanks for your time. – Killercam Nov 26 '12 at 9:52
    
By the code of ILSpy,you will see it as follows: – Szjdw Nov 27 '12 at 1:28
    
// System.Threading.Tasks.Task<TResult> [DebuggerBrowsable(DebuggerBrowsableState.Never)] public TResult Result { get { if (!base.IsCompleted) { Debugger.NotifyOfCrossThreadDependency(); base.Wait(); } base.ThrowIfExceptional(!this.m_resultWasSet); return this.m_result; } ... } – Szjdw Nov 27 '12 at 1:29

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