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I am facing a problem with understanding the use of macro function calls from within a printf() statement.

I have the code below :

#include<stdio.h>
#define f(g,h) g##h
main()
{
    printf("%d",f(100,10));
}

This code outputs "10010" as the answer.

I have learned that macro function call simply copy pastes the macro function code in place of the call with the arguments replaced.

So the code should be like :

#include<stdio.h>
#define f(g,h) g##h
main()
{
    printf("%d",100##10);
}

But when i executed the above code separately with substituted macro,i get a compilation error.

So how does the first code gives 10010 as the answer while the second code gives a compilation error?

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The ## ensures the parameters are concatenated. Therefore: f(100,10) is replaced by the preprocessor in: 10010 –  Tomas Nov 26 '12 at 9:16
2  
## is only valid INSIDE your #define statement and has 'no effect' unless the line starts as '#define [your stuff here]', since the '#define' is what instructs the compiler to treat that part of code specially. –  ActiveTrayPrntrTagDataStrDrvr Nov 26 '12 at 9:16

3 Answers 3

up vote 15 down vote accepted

The preprocessor concatenation operator ## is done before the macro is replaced. It can only be used in macro bodies.

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Perfect . So that explains why the second code didnt work . Thanks –  KP_K Nov 26 '12 at 9:44

Operator ## has speacial meaning for preprocessor, it's a token-paste operator which 'glues' two tokens together. So in your case, g and h are 'glued' together, resulting in new token - int literal 10010.

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There are some special characters like ## in a macro that change the rule 'simply substitutes text'.

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