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I have used rand function to generate a random number. I want to collect this number to a char buffer[10] or to a char *ptr

main()
{
    char *ptr;
    int a;
    srand(time(NULL));
    a = rand();
}

I want to copy the value in a to a buffer or point it by char *ptr, please help me out in this

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_itoa() –  acraig5075 Nov 26 '12 at 9:27

5 Answers 5

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Just for reference, here's how to use snprintf when you don't know in advance how big the buffer needs to be:

size_t len = snprintf(NULL, 0, "%d", a) + 1;
char *ptr = malloc(len);
if (!ptr) {
    // memory allocation failed, you must decide how to handle the error
} else {
    snprintf(ptr, len, "%d", a);

    ... // some time later

    free(ptr);
}

However, since your code is written in an old style (no return type for main and all variables declared at the start of the function), it may be that your C implementation doesn't have snprintf. Beware that Microsoft's _snprintf is not a direct substitute: when it truncates the output it doesn't tell you how much data there is to write.

In this case you can use the value RAND_MAX to work out how many digits the value might have, and hence how big your buffer needs to be. 10 is not sufficient on Linux, where RAND_MAX is 2147483647, and so you need 11 bytes for your nul-terminated string.

Btw, I've neglected the possibility of snprintf indicating an error other than truncation, which it does with the return value -1. That's because %d can't fail.

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You can use

char x[10];
sprintf(x, "%d", integer_number);
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2  
Please use snprintf instead. –  Cicada Nov 26 '12 at 9:21
    
@Petriuc Florin: Hi,if i want to use char *ptr, how to do it ? –  Manny Nov 26 '12 at 9:26

It's safer to use snprintf().

int answer = 42;
char buf[32];
snprintf(buf, sizeof(buf), "%d", answer);
printf("The answer is: %s\n", buf);

If you want to use a dynamically allocated buffer:

const size_t size = 32;
char *buf = malloc(size);
if (buf != NULL) {
    snprintf(buf, size, "%d", answer);
}
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1  
"Safer" to use snprintf without checking the return value, only if truncating the output is a less dangerous bug than buffer overrun. Which in this case, to be fair, it is, because rand() doesn't guarantee a uniform distribution anyway, so who cares if you further bias it by truncating some values? In general, using length-limited string functions without checking for truncation is extremely dangerous and can (albeit less frequently) lead to security flaws just as bad as the ones caused by buffer overruns. –  Steve Jessop Nov 26 '12 at 9:47
    
@SteveJessop "The functions snprintf() and vsnprintf() write at most size bytes (including the terminating null byte ('\0')) to str." - so even if they truncate, there's a NUL terminator. What's unsafe with that? Also, even if int is 64 bits long, 2^63 - 1 is still only 9 * 10^18, so 19 bytes are enough for printing it, so are the 32 bytes I provided. –  user529758 Nov 26 '12 at 10:02
1  
"What's unsafe with that?" - depends what you use the string value for. For example, if you use it as the directory for a chroot jail then you might "restrict" the process to too high a directory, giving it access to files it shouldn't. And just in general, it's often unsafe to use the wrong data or behave differently from what your function is documented to do. So you need to check for errors. If we accept your "also" argument, that your code is safe because the buffer is big enough, then sprintf would be equally safe. snprintf is "safer" only when the buffer might be too small. –  Steve Jessop Nov 26 '12 at 10:24
    
@SteveJessop I see, and it's a valid argument. But I still don't think "12345678" is a valid Unix filesystem path. –  user529758 Nov 26 '12 at 10:27
1  
quite, which is why in this case snprintf is not "safer". "Potentially better distributed when int is huge". –  Steve Jessop Nov 26 '12 at 10:28

If your compiler is GCC:

#define _GNU_SOURCE
#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

main()
{
    char *ptr;
    int a;
    srand(time(NULL));
    a = rand();
    asprintf(&ptr, "%d", a);
    printf("%s\n", ptr);
    //DO SOMETHING
    free(ptr);
}
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char ptr[10];
sprintf(ptr,"%d",a);

If you want to use char *ptr

char *ptr = malloc(10*sizeof(char));
sprintf(ptr,"%d",a);

// And If you want to free allocated space for ptr some where:
free(ptr);
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