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I'm using several akka actors to monitor my system, each responsible for a different component.

Some of the actors operations should not be performed in parallel. So I created an actor which holding a lock (LockActor). Once actor wants to perform such operation, he need to ask for approval from the LockActor and he cannot perform the operation till he get the approval.

If I want to make the code simple, in the requested actor I need to do somthing like:

while (LockActor.isLockHold()) {
    // perform the operation
}

This is of course breaks the whole design of actors system...

So I need to use messages which make the code a little bit complicated:

  1. Actor B need to send LockRequestMessage to the LockActor
  2. LockActor is holding queue which hold lock requests
  3. If the lock is possible, the LockActor send LockApprovalMessage to the first actor in the queue
  4. When actor B recieve LockApprovalMessage (not necessarily immediately) he need to perform the specific operation that was needed when he sent the LockRequestMessage (each actor can have several operations that need the lock)

So my question is - what is the best way implement such thing without breaking the actor system design but still keeping the code as simple as possible?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

There are two solutions I see here.

First, you could use the ask pattern:

class MyActor extends Actor {

    def receive = {
        case Start: {
            val f = lockActor ? LockRequestMessage
            f onSuccess {
                case LockApprovalMessage => {
                    //todo: do your thing
                }
            }
        }
    }

}

Please note that the ask method will create another actor which receives back the request message and completes the future - see the documentation for more details.

If you don't want to use the ask pattern you can very well use the become-unbecome mechanism like so:

class MyActor extends Actor {
    import context._

    def receive = {
        case Start: {
            lockActor ! LockRequestMessage
            become(waitForApproval)
        }
    }    

    def waitForApproval = {
        case LockApprovalMessage => {
            //todo: do your thing
        }
    }


}

You could very well process the two messages within the same receive function but you would have to do your bookkeeping of the state in which the actor is in at some point. The become-unbecome mechanism does this clean separation for you.

Please do note that if you are using locks to prevent actors from mutating some shared resource Akka provides some more sophisticated mechanisms for this:

Take a look at the documentation - it might simplify your implementation significantly.

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1  
Thank you introduced me to new capabilities of Akka! This is exactly what I was looking for - keeping the akka system design along with elegant code. –  user1768906 Nov 26 '12 at 13:21

Instead of using a single actor for getting the lock, why don't you just use a single actor to the the work? This is the preferred way in the actor model.

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1  
I don't have a single actor for getting the lock, but several actors whose responsible for different components and each of them can ask for the lock. Also the LockActor is not really holding the lock only, but holds all the shared resources. I'm not sure I understand your suggestion - do you suggest that for each need-lock-operation i'll add new actor that will perform the operation? –  user1768906 Nov 26 '12 at 10:10
2  
@tzofia drexin proposed instead of asking a lock send a command, e.g. doTheWorkForMe to that lock issuer actor. If that actor holds a lot of locks it can internally delegate work to some-other-worker actor. –  om-nom-nom Nov 26 '12 at 10:23
1  
Thanks @om-nom-nom. But in this way the code staying complicated because action that could be in one method (as I described in the question: while(LockActor.isLockHold()) {// perform the operation}) is now dispersed.. Maybe there is other correct and elegant solution? –  user1768906 Nov 26 '12 at 10:38
2  
@tzofia Drexin answer is the standard. The code won't be more complex once you will be used to this approach. Perhaps, it will even look simpler to you because you will avoid all classic lock problems (deadlocks, livelocks, etc.) while still being sure that the operations are done sequentially. –  paradigmatic Nov 26 '12 at 11:48

here is the idea, I don't know details as I am novice to scala:

  • create custom class ActorExecutor, which is a typed actor which accepts closure as a message, and process that message by invoking that closure.

  • for each lock, create an instance of ActorExecutor

  • whenever an actor wants to make some action with lock hold, it sends a closure to the ActorExecutor which represent that lock.

This way all actions sent to the concrete ActorExecutor instance, are performed sequentially.

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