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I have a task which can be easily be broken into parts which can and should be processed in parallel to optimize performance.

I wrote an producer actor which prepares each part of the task that could be processed independently. This preparation is relatively cheap.

I wrote a consumer Actor that processes each of the independent tasks. Depending on the parameters each piece of independent task may take up to a couple of seconds to be processed. All tasks are quite the same. They all process the same algorithm, with the same amount of data (but different values of course) resulting in about equal time of processing.

So the producer is much faster than the consumer. Hence there quickly may be 200 or 2000 tasks prepared (depending on the parameters). All of them consuming memory while just a couple of them can be executed at at once.

Now I see two simple strategies to consume and process the tasks:

  1. Create a new consumer actor instance for each task.

    • Each consumer processes only on task.
    • I assume there would be many consumer actor instances at the same time, while only a couple of them, can be processed at any point in time.
    • How does the default scheduler work? Can each consumer actor finish processing before the next consumer will be scheduled? Or will a consumer be interrupted and be replaced by another consumer resulting in longer time until the first task will be finished? I think this actor scheduling is not the same as process or thread scheduling, but I can imagine, that interruption can still have some disadvantages (e.g. like more cache misses).
  2. The other strategy is to use N instances of the consumer actor and send the tasks to process as messages to them.

    • Each consumer processes multiple tasks in sequence.
    • It is left up to me, to find a appropriate value for the N (number of consumers).
    • The distribution of the tasks over the N consumers is also left up to me.
  3. I could imagine a more sophisticated solution where more coordination is done between the producer and the consumers, but I can't make a good decision without knowledge about the scheduler.

If manual solution will not result in significant better performance, I would prefer a default solution (delivered by some part of the Scala world), where scheduling tasks are not left up to me (like strategy 1).

Question roundup:

  • How does the default scheduler work?
    • Can each consumer actor finish processing before the next consumer will be scheduled?
    • Or will a consumer be interrupted and be replaced by another consumer resulting in longer time until the first task will be finished?
    • What are the disadvantages when the scheduler frequently interrupts an actor and schedules another one? Cache-Misses?
    • Would this interruption and scheduling be like a context-change in process scheduling or thread scheduling?
  • Are there any more advantages or disadvantages comparing these strategies?
  • Especially does strategy 1 have disadvantages over strategy 2?
  • Which of these strategies is the best?
  • Is there a better strategy than I proposed?

I'm afraid, that questions like the last two can not be answered absolutely, but maybe this is possible this time as I tried to give a case as concrete as possible.

I think the other questions can be answered without much discussion. With those answers it should be possible to choose the strategy fitting the requirements best.

I made some research and thoughts myself and came up with some assumptions. If any of these assumptions are wrong, please tell me.

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3 Answers 3

If I were you, I would have gone ahead with 2nd option. A new actor instance for each task would be too tedious. Also with smart decision of N, complete system resources can be used.

Though this is not a complete solution. But one possible option is that, can't the producer stop/slow down the rate of producing tasks? This would be ideal. Only when there is a consumer available or something, the producer will produce more tasks.

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Assuming you are using Akka (if you don't, you should ;-) ), you could use a SmallestMailboxRouter to start a number of actors (you can also add a Resizer) and the message distribution will be handled according to some rules. You can read everything about routers here.

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For such a simple task, actors give no profit at all. Implement the producer as a Thread, and each task as a Runnable. Use a thread pool from java.util.concurrent to run the tasks. Use a java.util.concurrent. Semaphore to limit the number of prepared and running tasks: before creating the next tasks, producer aquires the sempahore, and each task releases the semaphore at the end of its execution.

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