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I have some nagging doubts about the correct way to implement IDisposable. Consider the following scenario...

public class Foo : IDisposable {...}

public class Bar : IDisposable {

    private bool disposed = false;
    private readonly Foo MyFoo;

    public Bar() {
        this.MyFoo = new Foo();
    }
    public Bar(Foo foo) {
        this.MyFoo = foo;
    }
    ~Bar() {
        Dispose(false);
    }

    protected virtual void Dispose(bool disposing) {
        if (!this.disposed) {
            if (disposing) {
               if (MyFoo != null) {
                   this.MyFoo.Dispose();
                   this.MyFoo = null;
               }
            }
            this.disposed = true;
        }
    }

    public void Dispose() {
        Dispose(true);
        GC.SuppressFinalize(this);
    }
}

My questions are:

1) If a class creates a disposable object, should it call the Dispose() method on that object in its own Dispose() method?

2) If a disposable object is passed to a class as a reference, should that class still call the Dispose() method on that reference object, or should it leave it to the class that created the object in the first place?

The above pattern seems to crop up quite a lot (particularly with DI), but I don't seem to be able to find a concrete example of the correct way to structure this.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted
~Bar() {
    Dispose(false);
}

Whenever you find yourself writing code like this, take a deep breath first and ask "do I actually need a finalizer?" It is extremely rare that you need one, a finalizer is only required when you take ownership of an unmanaged resource yourself.

The first litmus test is "does the finalizer actually do anything?" That's clear if you follow the code. It calls Dispose(false) and that code only does something when the argument is true. What follows is that you don't need a finalizer. This is entirely normal, finalizers is something that Microsoft worries about. They wrote the .NET framework classes that wrap an unmanaged resource. FileStream, Socket, etcetera. And above all, the SafeHandle classes, designed to wrap operating system handles. They have their own finalizer, you don't rewrite one yourself.

So without a finalizer, the code entirely collapses to the simple and correct implementation, you only need to call the Dispose() method of any disposable objects you store yourself:

public class Bar : IDisposable {
    private readonly Foo MyFoo;
    public Bar() {
        this.MyFoo = new Foo();
    }
    public void Dispose() {
        MyFoo.Dispose();
    }
}
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Thank you Hans, very useful. At the risk of abusing your help, do you have any views on the disposal of disposable objects created within the class as opposed to those supplied as a reference - in the class constructor for example? –  Neilski Nov 26 '12 at 13:50
    
This is something you need to work out for yourself. Who becomes the "owner" of the object? You can't really afford other code that created the Foo object disposing it before you are done using it. Nor would that other code know when you are done using it. So the normal way is to transfer ownership and you dispose it. Also done by the .NET framework, StreamWriter(Stream) constructor for example. –  Hans Passant Nov 26 '12 at 13:55

Refer to Excellent MSDN article Garbage Collection: Automatic Memory Management in the Microsoft .NET Framework

1) If a class creates a disposable object, should it call the Dispose() method on that object in its own Dispose() method?

Yes it should. Otherwise also, Dispose will be called. But that will increase life of object by atleast 1 generation. This is due to the finalizer in the class definition. Refer to the article link above.

2) If a disposable object is passed to a class as a reference, should that class still call the Dispose() method on that reference object, or should it leave it to the class that created the object in the first place?

It is responsibility of caller (more specifically the class which has created an instance) to call the Dispose method.

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Thank you, so, in the example above, should Bar create a flag that indicates whether Foo was created internally or passed as a reference? This flag could then be used in the virtual Dispose() method to call MyFoo.Dispose() or not. –  Neilski Nov 26 '12 at 11:46
    
Actually Foo.Dispose should be internally implemented by Foo itself. I mean the flag. In Bar.Dispose, Foo.Dispose should be called. And Repeated calls to dispose should not have any issue. Also, Since Bar creates MyFoo, MyFoo.Dispose should be called in Bar only, not in any other class. –  Tilak Nov 26 '12 at 11:47
    
In some cases, an object which receives a parameter of a type which implements IDisposable will accept the responsibility for calling Dispose on it. The key concept underlying IDisposable is "will the last one to leave the room please turn out the lights". At any given time, it should be possible to identify precisely one object which has responsibility for cleaning up each IDisposable; that responsibility starts with its creator, but may be handed off if the creator makes the object for the benefit of some other object and no longer needs it itself. –  supercat Nov 27 '12 at 17:26
    
When the object comes from Factory/DI, and supposed to be owned by one class, the owner class should be responsible to call Dispose. If object is share by multiple classes, and no one is sure if they are the last one, how can they call Dispose() ?? It calls for re-factoring. –  Tilak Nov 27 '12 at 17:33

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