Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

For example, i have this code:

with MyClass() as x:
    print 'I have only {0}'.format(x)
    with MyClass() as y:
        print 'I have {0} and {1}'.format(x, y)
    print 'Again only {0}'.format(x)

x and y both should be de-initialized after exit of corresponding with blocks. Also x and y aren't instances of MyClass.

__exit__ has only three arguments and each argument is None (if no exception supplied).

How can i determine at __exit__ which block is just exited and what value was returned by __enter__?

(N.B. code should be thread-safe).


Example:

class MyClass(object):
    def __enter__(self):
        if moon_phase > 0:
            return 123
        else:
            return 456
    def __exit__(self):
        number = what_was_returned_by_enter()
        print 'End of block with', number


 with MyClass() as x:
    print x  # 123
    with MyClass() as y:
        print x, 'and', y  # 123 and 456
    # printed "End of block with 456"
    print x  # 123
 # printed "End of block with 123"
share|improve this question
    
Just keep track of the value you returned by storing it in an instance variable. –  sloth Nov 26 '12 at 13:03

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Since you have a custom class handling your context, self will be the context manager instance.

You'll need to examine its state (stored at __init__() creation time or when __enter__() was called) to determine which one you just exited.

The following example stores the return value of __enter__ on the instance so you can retrieve it again when __exit__ is being called:

class MyClass(object):
    def __enter__(self):
        if moon_phase > 0:
            self.returnval = 123
        else:
            self.returnval = 456
        return self.returnval

    def __exit__(self, *args):
        number = self.returnval
        print 'End of block with', number
share|improve this answer
    
But if i write nested with statements, self.returnval will be rewrited at start of child block and i'll lost value from parent block. –  werehuman Nov 26 '12 at 13:04
1  
@werehuman: No, unless you use mutable default arguments on your class or your methods, that is not possible. Each context manager is a separate instance. Please update your question with example code if you want help with figuring out why your code is not working in your specific situation. –  Martijn Pieters Nov 26 '12 at 13:06
1  
You are right, it creates new instance. I am going to read manuals. –  werehuman Nov 26 '12 at 13:12
    
@werehuman: I think this question might help you with understanding what's going on in your example. –  Jonas Wielicki Nov 26 '12 at 13:13
    
@werehuman: I think it's your use of the moon_phase global, both of your context managers will return 123 unless moon_phase is changed between calls. –  Martijn Pieters Nov 26 '12 at 13:14

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.