Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am a complete beginner with this so please forgive any naivety here. I want to get into developing applications that use databases. I am fairly experienced (as an amateur) at web based database utilization (mysql, pdo, mssql with php and old style asp) so my SQL knowledge is fairly good.

Things I have done already..

  • Create forms application
  • Add four text boxes (first name, last name, email, phone)
  • Added a datagrid control
  • Created a database connection using 'Microsoft SQL Server Database File (SqlClient)'
  • Created a table with fields corresponding to the four text boxes.

What I want to be able to do now is, when a button is clicked, the contents of the four edit boxes are inserted using SQL. I don't want to use any 'wrapper' code that hides the SQL from me. I want to use my experience with SQL as much as possible.

So I guess what I am asking is how do I now write the necessary code to run an SQL query to insert that data. I don't need to know the SQL code obviously, just the c# code to use the 'local database file' connection to run the SQL query.

An aside question might be - is there a better/simpler way of doing this than using the 'Microsoft SQL Server Database File' connection type (I have used it because it looks like it's a way to do it without having to set up an entire sql server)

share|improve this question

migrated from superuser.com Nov 26 '12 at 14:24

This question came from our site for computer enthusiasts and power users.

    
Might be a better question on StackOverflow. Do not repost as this will likely be moved by a moderator –  Dave M Nov 26 '12 at 13:52
    
I have edited your title. Please see, "Should questions include “tags” in their titles?", where the consensus is "no, they should not". –  John Saunders Nov 26 '12 at 14:32
    
That's strange - I thought I had posted it to stackoverflow to begin with. –  MrVimes Nov 27 '12 at 13:29

2 Answers 2

The below is inserting data using parameters which I believe is a better approach:

            var insertSQL = "INSERT INTO yourTable (firstName, lastName, email, phone) VALUES (firstName, lastName, email, phone)";

            string connectionString = "Data Source=myServerAddress;Initial Catalog=myDataBase;Integrated Security=SSPI; User ID=userid;Password=pwd;"

            using (var cn = new SqlCeConnection(connectionString))
            using (var cmd = new SqlCeCommand(insertSQL, cn))
            {
                cn.Open();

                cmd.Parameters.Add("firstName", SqlDbType.NVarChar);
                cmd.Parameters.Add("lastName", SqlDbType.NVarChar);
                cmd.Parameters.Add("email", SqlDbType.NVarChar);
                cmd.Parameters.Add("phone", SqlDbType.NVarChar);

                cmd.Parameters["firstName"].Value = firstName;
                cmd.Parameters["lastName"].Value = lastName;
                cmd.Parameters["email"].Value = email;
                cmd.Parameters["phone"].Value = phone;
                cmd.ExecuteNonQuery();

            }

This is selecting data from database and populating datagridview:

            var dt = new DataTable();

            string connectionString = "Data Source=myServerAddress;Initial Catalog=myDataBase;Integrated Security=SSPI; User ID=userid;Password=pwd;"

            using (var cn = new SqlCeConnection(connectionString )
            using (var cmd = new SqlCeCommand("Select * From yourTable", cn))
            {
                cn.Open();

                using (var reader = cmd.ExecuteReader())
                {
                    dt.Load(reader);

                    //resize the DataGridView columns to fit the newly loaded content.
                    yourDataGridView.AutoSize = true;                                       yourDataGridView.AutoResizeColumns(DataGridViewAutoSizeColumnsMode.AllCells);

                    //bind the data to the grid
                    yourDataGridView.DataSource = dt;
                }
            }
share|improve this answer

This first example is an over view based upon how I think it will be easier to understand but this is not a recommended approach due to vulnerability to SQL injection (a better approach further down). However, I feel it is easier to understand.

private void InsertToSql(string wordToInsert)
  {
        string connectionString = Data Source=myServerAddress;Initial Catalog=myDataBase;Integrated Security=SSPI; User ID=myDomain\myUsername;Password=myPassword;

        string queryString = "INSERT INTO table_name (column1) VALUES (" + wordToInsert + ")"; //update as you feel fit of course for insert/update etc

    using (SqlConnection connection = new SqlConnection(connectionString))
    {
        connection.Open()
        SqlDataAdapter adapter = new SqlDataAdapter();
        SqlCommand command = new SqlCommand(queryString, connection);        

        command.ExecuteNonQuery();
        connection.Close();
    }
}

I would also suggest wrapping it in a try/catch block to ensure the connection closes if it errors.

I am not able to test this but I think it is OK!

Again don't do the above in live as it allows SQL injection - use parameters instead. However, it may be argued it is easier to do the above if you come from PHP background (just to get comfortable).

This uses parameters:

public void Insert(string customerName)
{
try
   {
    string connectionString = Data Source=myServerAddress;Initial Catalog=myDataBase;Integrated Security=SSPI; User ID=myDomain\myUsername;Password=myPassword;

    using (SqlConnection connection = new SqlConnection(connectionString))
    {
    connection.Open();
    connection.Open() SqlCommand command = new SqlCommand( "INSERT INTO Customers (CustomerName" + "VALUES (@Name)", connection);

    command.Parameters.Add("@Name", SqlDbType.NChar, 50, " + customerName +");
    command.ExecuteNonQuery();
    connection.Close();
    }
 catch()
 {
     //Logic in here
 }
 finally()
 {
    if(con.State == ConnectionState.Open)
    {
        connection.Close();
    }
 }

}

And then you just change the SQL string to select or add!

share|improve this answer
    
I am familiar with paramaterized queries in php (using PDO) so coming from a php background doesn't negate that :) I will try this code when I get to my PC tonight. –  MrVimes Nov 27 '12 at 13:30
    
Cool - wasn't meant to be patronizing, when I came from VBScript I really struggled so thought I'd try to be helpful :) Please note, the code above is not tested as I'm not in a dev. area at present. –  Dave Nov 27 '12 at 13:33
    
Don't worry, I didn't see it as patronizing. –  MrVimes Nov 27 '12 at 20:47
    
I've been trying all kinds of alternatives to get the connection working. I'm trying to connect to a local database file. I just keep getting " A network-related or instance-specific error occurred while establishing a connection to SQL Server. The server was not found or was not accessible. Verify that the instance name is correct and that SQL Server is configured to allow remote connections. (provider: Named Pipes Provider, error: 40 - Could not open a connection to SQL Server)" –  MrVimes Nov 27 '12 at 22:10
    
I made the mistake of assuming that 'Local Database File' connection type didn't require a sql instance running. I wanted something 'zero config'. When I found out it does require a sql instance I switched to the SQL CE option. When I couldn't get that working I figured out how to get sqlite working and I'm using that now. –  MrVimes Nov 28 '12 at 12:41

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.