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I am studying Distributed Systems and when it comes to the RPC part, I have heard about these two semantics (at-most-once and exactly-once). I understand that the at-most-once is used on databases for instances, when we don't want duplicate execution.

First question:

How is this achieved? How does the server know that it shouldnt execute the request again? It might be a duplicate but it might be a legitimate request as well.

The second question is:

What is the difference between the two semantics in the title? I can read :). I know that at-most-once might not be executed at all but, what does exactly-once do that guarantees the execution?

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2 Answers 2

In cases of atmost once semantics, request is sent again in case of failure, but request is filtered on the server for duplicates.
In exactly once semantics, request is sent again, request is filtered for duplicate and there is a guarantee for the server to restart after failure and start processing requests from where it crashed.

But exactly once is not realizable because what happens when client sends request, and before it reaches the server, server crashes. There is no way of tracking the request.

http://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Remote_Procedure_Call#Fehlersemantik

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Bump, I'm studying this too and found this, hope it helps (helped me),

At-least-once versus at-most-once?

let's take an example: acquiring a lock
if client and server stay up, client receives lock
if client fails, it may have the lock or not (server needs a plan!)
if server fails, client may have lock or not
at-least-once: client keeps trying
at-most-once: client will receive an exception
what does a client do in the case of an exception?
need to implement some application-specific protocol
ask server, do i have the lock?
server needs to have a plan for remembering state across reboots
e.g., store locks on disk.
at-least-once (if we never give up)
clients keep trying. server may run procedure several times
server must use application state to handle duplicates
if requests are not idempotent
but difficult to make all request idempotent
e.g., server good store on disk who has lock and req id
check table for each requst
even if server fails and reboots, we get correct semantics
What is right?
depends where RPC is used.
simple applications:
at-most-once is cool (more like procedure calls)
more sophisticated applications:
need an application-level plan in both cases
not clear at-once gives you a leg up
=> Handling machine failures makes RPC different than procedure calls

quoted from distributed systems and paradigms 2nd edition

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