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Synopsis: I need to display a table like the one below:

table with different spacing between head and body

Necessities:

  • Semantic HTML coding
  • No scripting

HTML:

<table>
<thead>
    <tr>
        <th colspan=2>
            One
        </th>
        <th colspan=2>
            Two
        </th>
    </tr>
</thead>
<tbody>
    <tr>
        <td>
            One
        </td>
        <td>
            Two
        </td>
        <td>
            Three
        </td>
        <td>
            Four
        </td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
        <td>
            One
        </td>
        <td>
            Two
        </td>
        <td>
            Three
        </td>
        <td>
            Four
        </td>
    </tr>
<tbody>
</table>

First attempt:

"border-collapse attribute"

I tried border-collapse: separate; on thead and border-collapse: collapse; on tbody but that simply didn't work.

table {
    border-collapse: collapse;
    border-spacing: 1em;
}

table thead {
    border-collapse: separate;
}

table tbody tr {
    border-bottom: 1px solid black;
}

table thead tr th{
    border-bottom: 1px solid black;
    padding: 10px;
    text-align: center;
}

table tbody tr td {
    border-bottom: 1px solid black;
    padding: 10px;
}​

On JSFIDDLE


Second Attempt:

"Adding blank cells"

I can get the preferred look of the table by adding blank cells in HTML code. But this approach defects semantic structure.

table {
    border-collapse: collapse;
    border-spacing: 1em;
}

table tbody tr {
    border-bottom: 1px solid black;
}

table thead tr th[colspan="2"]{
    border-bottom: 1px solid black;
    padding: 10px;
    text-align: center;
}

table tbody tr td {
    border-bottom: 1px solid black;
    padding: 10px;
}​

On JSFIDDLE


Other various attemps

I also tried -webkit-border-image: -webkit-linear-gradient(left, black 95%, white 5%); on headers borders but couldn't manage to get it working.


After all I am open to new suggestions.

Note: This is going to be in an eBook file. So general background color may vary in different reader applications.

share|improve this question
up vote 0 down vote accepted

Depending on your compatibility requirements, you have the option of using CSS generated-content:

th {
    /* other CSS */
    position: relative;
}

thead th::before,
thead th::after {
    content: '';
    position: absolute;
    bottom: -1px;
    width: 0.5em;
    border-bottom: 1px solid #fff;
}

thead th::before {
    left: 0;
}

thead th::after {
    right: 0;
}

JS Fiddle demo.

For the sake of simplicity I've given both th elements the same ::before and ::after, however if there's always only two th elements the selectors can be changed:

th {
    /* other CSS */
    position: relative;
}

thead th:first-child::after,
thead th:last-child::before {
    content: '';
    position: absolute;
    bottom: -1px;
    width: 0.5em;
    border-bottom: 1px solid #fff;
}

thead th:last-child::before {
    left: 0;
}

thead th:first-child::after {
    right: 0;
}

JS Fiddle demo.

share|improve this answer
    
Why add absolute-positioned generated content when you can pad the th element instead? – Rémi Breton Nov 26 '12 at 15:00
    
you need to watch out for positioned elements directly inside table cells because firefox doesn't position things relative to cells properly – Dave Taylor Nov 26 '12 at 15:01
1  
@Rémi: because, as far as I'm aware, the padding doesn't affect the border-bottom's length. Which seems to be the requirement. – David Thomas Nov 26 '12 at 15:02
    
Yeah, my bad, you're right. But adding those pseudo-elements seems risky... – Rémi Breton Nov 26 '12 at 15:06
    
I will give it a try. – username Nov 26 '12 at 15:06

Here's my try.

Basically I just did:

table thead tr th[colspan="2"]:first-child {
    border-right: 20px solid white;
}
table thead tr th[colspan="2"]:nth-child(2) {
    border-left: 20px solid white;
}

Note: I personally wouldn't use such complex selectors, but this should give you the idea.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for the answer. It sure is a good approach but i forgot to mention that it is supposed to be in an eBook (ePub3). So background color may vary on the reader applications preferences and setting border-color to transparent kills the magic. – username Nov 26 '12 at 15:03
    
In general, I recommend to carefully test this “kind of magic” on older versions of Internet Explorer that you might be expected to support. – Paramaeleon Nov 27 '12 at 7:46

You can do this by adding white borders. You then need to turn them off from the first and last cells.

table thead tr th{
    border-left: solid 10px white;
    border-right: solid 10px white;
    border-bottom: 1px solid black;
    padding: 10px;
    text-align: center;
}
table thead tr th:first-child {
    border-left: none;
}
table thead tr th:last-child {
    border-right: none;
}

Here's an updated js fiddle http://jsfiddle.net/davetayls/Tw5Vb/9/

share|improve this answer
    
Please don't post duplicate answers. – Chris Nov 26 '12 at 14:59
    
this wasn't duplicate when i posted it – Dave Taylor Nov 26 '12 at 15:02
    
@DaveTaylor Check out the timestamps. – Chris Nov 26 '12 at 15:04
    
@Abody97 i know, i was composing mine while you submitted yours! looking closer, this is actually slightly different from your even though it is the same concept. it uses less complicated selectors. don't be so quick to mark down. – Dave Taylor Nov 26 '12 at 15:07
    
@DavidThomas take a look at the jsfiddle, it does exactly what was asked – Dave Taylor Nov 26 '12 at 15:07

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