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To celebrate the 20,000th question with the -tag on Stack Overflow, please help me to extract the R release dates from the Wikipedia page.

My attempts:

library(XML)
x <- readHTMLTable("http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/R_(programming_language)")

This doesn't work because the table is in fact a list, not an HTML table.

library(httr)
x <- GET("http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/R_(programming_language)")
text <- content(x, "parsed")

This extracts the text, but my xpath is rusty, so I couldn't extract the relevant release dates.

How can I do this?


PS. The Wikipedia page is the only source I could find, but please feel free to post a solution using canonical source, if there is one.

share|improve this question
1  
I was going to suggest scraping the R-announce e-mail list ... –  Ben Bolker Nov 26 '12 at 15:03
    
To test our code, we can check that it finds 2.14.2 was released three years after 1.0.0 –  MattBagg Nov 26 '12 at 16:13
    
Now we're just showing off ;) Bonus points for a shiny app? –  Brandon Bertelsen Nov 26 '12 at 17:13

4 Answers 4

Why don't you use the file dates on the canonical ftp archive in Vienna?

Edit: Eg

 lynx -dump http://cran.r-project.org/src/base/R-0/ | grep tgz | grep -v http

gets you a table you can parse from R. Gets you file sizes as a benefit. Rinse and repeat for R-1 and R-2 directories.

share|improve this answer
    
Good suggestion. How do I do that? –  Andrie Nov 26 '12 at 15:04
    
You can do it directly, or via a mirror, or start with lynx -dump and parse the text file. I have done it many different ways. –  Dirk Eddelbuettel Nov 26 '12 at 15:05
    
Nice, although, as it stands, this looks OS dependent. How would you write this using R only? –  Andrie Nov 26 '12 at 15:12
1  
Not sure; I just dug around eg the old CRANberries code when I had to bootstrap the database with old entries. As that was 'just for me', I used links -dump ... | awk '/tar.gz {print $3, $4}'. –  Dirk Eddelbuettel Nov 26 '12 at 15:28
up vote 16 down vote accepted

Edited to include R version 3.0.0 and above

Dirk Eddelbuettel provided the canonical link to the .0 releases of R.

Here is some code that collates the tables from the three separate URLs, one for each major release, and then plot it:

library(XML)
library(lattice)


getRdates <- function(){
  url <- paste0("http://cran.r-project.org/src/base/R-", 0:3)
  x <- lapply(url, function(x)readHTMLTable(x, stringsAsFactors=FALSE)[[1]])
  x <- do.call(rbind, x)
  x <- x[grep("R-(.*)(\\.tar\\.gz|\\.tgz)", x$Name), c(-1, -5)]
  x$Release <- gsub("(R-.*)\\.(tar\\.gz|tgz)", "\\1", x$Name)
  x$Date <- as.POSIXct(x[["Last modified"]], format="%d-%b-%Y %H:%M")
  x$Release <- reorder(x$Release, x$Date)
  x
}

x <- getRdates()
dotplot(Release~Date, data=x)

enter image description here

share|improve this answer
    
Awesome! And if we could use a similarity metric like normalized compression distance to show incremental change on the y-axis, I'd really swoon. –  MattBagg Nov 26 '12 at 16:26
    
+1 I really have to build do.call into my skillset. Pretty. –  Brandon Bertelsen Nov 26 '12 at 20:08
    
do.call and lapply and like peanut butter and jelly. –  Dirk Eddelbuettel Nov 27 '12 at 21:38

Kind of cheating, now that Dirk has given us an easy table to scrape:

library(XML)
theurl <- "http://cran.r-project.org/src/base/R-0/"
h <- htmlParse(theurl)
h <- readHTMLTable(h)
h <- h[[1]]
h <- droplevels(h[-c(1,2,30),])
levels(h$Name) <- gsub(".tgz","",levels(h$Name),fixed=TRUE)

h

Gives us:

         Name     Last modified Size Description
3      R-0.49 23-Apr-1997 14:53 959K            
4   R-0.50-a1 22-Jul-1997 16:44 1.0M            
5   R-0.50-a4 10-Sep-1997 14:31 1.0M            
6    R-0.60.0 04-Dec-1997 09:58 1.1M            
7    R-0.60.1 07-Dec-1997 02:59 1.1M            
8    R-0.61.0 22-Dec-1997 00:00 1.1M            
9    R-0.61.1 13-Jan-1998 00:00 1.1M            
10   R-0.61.2 18-Mar-1998 00:00 1.1M            
11   R-0.61.3 03-May-1998 00:00 1.1M            
12   R-0.62.0 15-Jun-1998 00:00 1.2M            
13   R-0.62.1 15-Jun-1998 00:00 1.2M            
14   R-0.62.2 10-Jul-1998 11:59 1.3M            
15   R-0.62.3 28-Aug-1998 11:01 1.3M            
16   R-0.62.4 24-Oct-1998 00:00 1.3M            
17   R-0.63.0 14-Nov-1998 04:57 1.5M            
18   R-0.63.1 05-Dec-1998 02:25 1.5M            
19   R-0.63.2 12-Jan-1999 02:21 1.5M            
20   R-0.63.3 06-Mar-1999 04:27 1.5M            
21   R-0.64.0 08-Apr-1999 01:48 1.5M            
22   R-0.64.1 08-May-1999 02:55 1.9M            
23   R-0.64.2 05-Jul-1999 21:15 1.9M            
24   R-0.65.0 28-Aug-1999 00:18 2.1M            
25   R-0.65.1 07-Oct-1999 01:46 2.2M            
26   R-0.90.0 22-Nov-1999 18:07 2.3M            
27   R-0.90.1 15-Dec-1999 14:05 2.4M            
28   R-0.99.0 07-Feb-2000 13:09 2.8M            
29  R-0.99.0a 09-Feb-2000 12:28 2.8M    
share|improve this answer

And building on the work already done:

h <- getRdates()
# Find version release rate
library(plyr)
h <- subset(h,select=c(-Description))
Version <- sub("^R-([0-9a-z.-]+)\\.t.*","\\1",h$Name)
h$bigVersion <- as.numeric(sub("^([0-9])\\..+","\\1",Version))
h$smallVersion <- as.numeric(sub("^[0-9]\\.([0-9]+).+","\\1",Version))
h$majorVersion <- as.numeric(paste(h$bigVersion,sprintf( "%02.0f", h$smallVersion ),sep="."))
h <- ddply( h, .(bigVersion,majorVersion), function(x) {
    x$tinyVersion <- seq(nrow(x))
    x
})

# Plot
plot( majorVersion~Date, data=h, pch=".",cex=3)
abline(h=seq(1,2),col="red")

rates

library(lattice)
print(xyplot( smallVersion~Date|bigVersion, data=h, pch=".",cex=3))

lattice

And comparing all together:

h <- ddply( h, .(bigVersion), function(x) {
   x$bigElapsedTime <- x$Date - min(x$Date)
   x
})

png("c:/temp/Rplot3.png")
plot( smallVersion~bigElapsedTime, data=h, pch=".",cex=3,col=h$bigVersion+1)
dev.off()

all on one plot

# How many minor releases per major release

> table(rle(h$majorVersion)$lengths, substring(rle(h$majorVersion)$values,1,1))

    0 1 2
  1 1 0 0
  2 5 5 9
  3 1 1 6
  4 2 4 1
  5 1 0 0
share|improve this answer
    
Looks like the release schedule for the 0. releases was entirely ad hoc and then for 1. and 2. they moved to a formal schedule and have been quite consistent in the timing of releases. –  Ari B. Friedman Nov 26 '12 at 17:28

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