Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Essentially I'm wondering if the following can be done in Ruby.

So for example:

def bar(symbol) 
  # magic code goes here, it outputs "a = 100" 
end

def foo
  a = 100 
  bar(:a) 
end
share|improve this question

5 Answers 5

You have to pass foo's context to bar:

def foo
  a = 100
  bar(:a, binding)
end
def bar(sym, b)
  puts "#{sym} is #{eval(sym.to_s, b)}"
end
share|improve this answer
3  
@fotanus, uh no. You'll notice the date of my answer predates ruby 2 by 3.5 years. –  glenn jackman May 10 '13 at 17:29
    
Sorry, you are right. –  fotanus May 10 '13 at 17:38
up vote 9 down vote accepted

There is no built-in way to get a callers binding in Ruby in 1.8.X or 1.9.X.

You can use https://github.com/banister/binding_of_caller to work around.

In MRI 2.0 you can use RubyVM::DebugInspector, see: https://github.com/banister/binding_of_caller/blob/master/lib/binding_of_caller/mri2.rb

Working sample in MRI 2.0:

require 'debug_inspector'

def bar(symbol)
  RubyVM::DebugInspector.open do |inspector|
    val = eval(symbol.to_s, inspector.frame_binding(2))
    puts "#{symbol}: #{val}"
  end
end

def foo
  a = 100
  bar(:a)
end

foo
# a: 100
share|improve this answer
    
here's an example of the fragile way to use set_trace_func to do so : stackoverflow.com/questions/1314592/… –  rampion Sep 11 '09 at 17:12
1  
Should include disclaimer: Please don't do this unless you are actually using it for debugging of some sort. –  tmandry Jan 26 '14 at 4:35

Just FYI, here's a "hacky way". This is my (re-)implementation of well-known ppp.rb:

#!/usr/bin/ruby
#
# better ppp.rb
#

require 'continuation' if RUBY_VERSION >= '1.9.0'

def ppp(*sym)
  cc = nil
  ok = false

  set_trace_func lambda {|event, file, lineno, id, binding, klass|
    if ok
      set_trace_func nil
      cc.call(binding)
    else
      ok = event == "return"
    end
  }
  return unless bb = callcc{|c| cc = c; nil }

  sym.map{|s| v = eval(s.to_s, bb); puts "#{s.inspect} = #{v}"; v }
end

a = 1
s = "hello"
ppp :a, :s

exit 0

This currently fails with 1.9.[012] due to a bug in ruby's set_trace_func.

share|improve this answer
    
Very interesting! I've adapted it to build my own version of caller_binding. But what is ppp? –  Sony Santos Jul 30 '11 at 15:36

Here's a easier syntax hack, using a passed in block binding:

  def loginfo &block
    what = yield.to_s
    evaled = eval(what, block.binding)
    Rails.logger.info "#{what} = #{evaled.inspect}"
  end

called like this:

  x = 1
  loginfo{ :x }

will log out:

  x = 1
share|improve this answer
1  
FYI updated my answer –  Sam Saffron May 10 '13 at 3:58

Check article out Variable Bindings in Ruby

class Reference
  def initialize(var_name, vars)
    @getter = eval "lambda { #{var_name} }", vars
    @setter = eval "lambda { |v| #{var_name} = v }", vars
  end
  def value
    @getter.call
  end
  def value=(new_value)
    @setter.call(new_value)
  end
end

def ref(&block)
  Reference.new(block.call, block.binding)
end

def bar(ref)
  # magic code goes here, it outputs "a = 100" 
  p ref.value
end

def foo
  a = 100 
  bar(ref{:a}) 
end

foo
share|improve this answer
    
+1 looks very interesting, I wonder if this can be done without the block though ... –  Sam Saffron Aug 31 '09 at 13:15
    
I don't think it can be done without the block in ruby 1.8.x. I'm not familiar with ruby 1.9.x, so things may be different there. –  neoneye Aug 31 '09 at 16:20
    
In Ruby 2.1 you still need the block, but implementation of Reference can be redone using calls to Binding#local_variable_get and Binding#vars.local_variable_set. Although, the current implementation probably allows for calls to reader and writer methods in addition to local variables, whereas the new implementation wouldn't... –  Ajedi32 Jan 13 at 21:45

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.