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I have data in a 3d dictionary as:

 movieid, date,customer_id,views
 0, (2011,12,22), 0, 22
 0, (2011,12,22), 1, 2
 0, (2011,12,22), 2, 12
 .....
 0, (2011,12,22), 7, 2
 0, (2011,12,23), 0, 123

.. so basically the data represents how many times a movie has been watched each day.. by each customer (there are just 8 customers)..

Now, I want to calculate.. on average how many times a movie has been watched by each customer.

So basically

    movie_id,customer_id, avg_views
     0, 0, 33.2
     0, 1 , 22.3

  and so on

What is the pythonic way to solve this.

Thakns

Edit:

 data = defaultdict(lambda : defaultdict(dict))
 date = datetime.datetime(2011,1,22)
 data[0][date][0] = 22
 print data
defaultdict(<function <lambda> at 0x00000000022F7CF8>, 
 {0: defaultdict(<type 'dict'>, 
 {datetime.datetime(2011, 1, 22, 0, 0): {0: 22}}))

Suppose there are just 2 customers, 1 movie and 2 days worth of data

 movie_id, date, customer_id,views
 0 , 2011,1,22,0,22
 0 , 2011,1,22,1,23
 0 , 2011,1,23,0,44

note: The customer 1 didnt watched a movie id 0 on 23rd jan Now the answer would

 movie_id,customer_id,avg_views
  0   , 0 ,    (22+44)/2
  0,    1,      (23)/1
share|improve this question
4  
Please post (at least one entry from) the 3-d dictionary that holds this data. –  inspectorG4dget Nov 26 '12 at 16:05
2  
if you could show us also how you want the result to look like... –  Inbar Rose Nov 26 '12 at 16:06
    
Could you please format your defaultdict so that it's human readable? Use pprint.pprint if needed. –  inspectorG4dget Nov 26 '12 at 16:12
    
That's a pretty complicated defaultdict you have there. Have you considered using Numpy? –  larsmans Nov 26 '12 at 16:14
2  
Actually, I think you should make it data[customer_id][movie_id][date]=count –  inspectorG4dget Nov 26 '12 at 16:25

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

sum makes this easy. In my original version I used dict.keys() a lot, but iterating over a dictionary gives you the keys by default.

This function calculates a single line of the result:

def average_daily_views(movie_id, customer_id, data):
    daily_values = [data[movie_id][date][customer_id] for date in data[movie_id]]
    return sum(daily_values)/len(daily_values)

Then you can just loop it to get whatever form you want. Maybe:

def get_averages(data):
    result = [average_daily_views(movie, customer, data) for customer in 
              data[movie] for movie in data]
share|improve this answer

My vision are:

pool = [
    (0, (2011,12,22), 0, 22),
    (0, (2011,12,22), 1, 2),
    (0, (2011,12,22), 2, 12),
    (0, (2011,12,22), 7, 2),
    (0, (2011,12,23), 0, 123),
]


def calc(memo, row):
    if (row[2] in memo.keys()):
        num, value = memo[2]
    else:
        num, value = 0, 0

    memo[row[2]] = (num + 1, value + row[3])
    return memo

# dic with sum and number
v = reduce(calc, pool, {})
# calc average
avg = map(lambda x: (x[0], x[1][1] / x[1][0]), v.items())

print dict(avg)

Where avg - is dictionary with key = customer_id, and value - average of views

share|improve this answer

I think you should restructure your data a little, to serve your purposes better:

restructured_data = collections.defaultdict(lambda: collections.deafualtdict(collections.defaultdict(int)))
for movie in data:
    for date in data[movie]:
        for customer,count in date.iteritems():
            restructured_data[customer_id][movie_id][date] += count

averages = collections.defaultdict(dict)
for customer in restructured_data:
    for movie in restructured_data[customer]:
        avg = sum(restructured_data[customer][movie].itervalues())/float(len(restructured_data[customer][movie]))
        averages[movie][customer] = avg

for movie in averages:
    for customer, avg in averages[movie].iteritems():
        print "%d, %d, %f" %(movie, customer, avg)

Hope this helps

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