Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

In socket programming in C, I saw in a simple client/server example that before calling socket(), the int variable that will hold the socket file descriptor is set to 0.

int fds;
fds = 0;
fds = socket (AF_INET, SOCK_DGRAM, 0);
if (fds == -1) {
     perror("Socket():");
     exit(-1);
}

Is there any reason for this?

share|improve this question
add comment

2 Answers

No, none. socket will always return a value.

share|improve this answer
add comment

As long as you don't access the fds variable before writing to it, there is no real reason for that.

If, however, you have a certain distance between definition and assignment, it might be useful to set fds to an "invalid" value such as -1:

int fds = -1;
[ lots of code which might accidentally use fds ]
fds = socket (AF_INET, SOCK_DGRAM, 0);
if (fds == -1) {
     perror("Socket():");
     exit(-1);
}

Now, imagine I accidentally use fds in the code somewhere between int fds = -1; and fds = socket(...), I definitely get an error because of that invalid usage.

On the other hand, if I didn't set fds to -1, it could have any value, maybe a value which is a valid FD in our process. If I do a read() on this file - or even worse: a write()`, I might end with corrupted data structures.

share|improve this answer
1  
Sorry, but this makes no sense. socket will still set fds. –  Abbondanza Nov 26 '12 at 16:21
1  
@Abbondanza Of course it does. But only after the erroneus use of the wrong fds value. –  glglgl Nov 26 '12 at 17:19
1  
However, this is not a reasonable approach to capture such errors. So if there is a reason (as the OP asked) for a programmer to produce such code, it simply is that he or she is not good at programming. A better programmer would condense declaration and definition into one statement (int fds = socket(...)) or leave fds undefined and use the compiler option -Wuninitialized. –  Abbondanza Nov 26 '12 at 22:37
    
@Abbondanza Condensing would indeed be the way to go. Leaving undefined and relying on a compiler option, however, would IMHO be only the 3rd option. –  glglgl Nov 27 '12 at 6:51
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.