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What is the proper way to modify environment variables like PATH in OS X? I've looked on google a little bit and found 3 different files to edit:

  • /etc/paths
  • ~/.profile
  • ~/.tcshrc

I don't even have some of these, and I'm pretty sure that .tcshrc is wrong, since osx uses bash now. Anybody have any idea where these variables, especially PATH, are defined?

Edit: I'm running OS X 10.5

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25 Answers 25

Bruno is right on track. I've done extensive research and if you want to set variables that are available in all GUI apps, your only option is /etc/launchd.conf

Please note that environment.plist does not work for applications launched via Spotlight. This is documented by Steve Sexton here.

1) Open a terminal prompt

2) Type sudo vi /etc/launchd.conf (note: this file might not yet exist)

3) Put contents like the following into the file

# Set environment variables here so they are available globally to all apps
# (and Terminal), including those launched via Spotlight.
#
# After editing this file run the following command from the terminal to update 
# environment variables globally without needing to reboot.
# NOTE: You will still need to restart the relevant application (including 
# Terminal) to pick up the changes!
# grep -E "^setenv" /etc/launchd.conf | xargs -t -L 1 launchctl
#
# See http://www.digitaledgesw.com/node/31
# and http://stackoverflow.com/questions/135688/setting-environment-variables-in-os-x/
#
# Note that you must hardcode the paths below, don't use enviroment variables.
# You also need to surround multiple values in quotes, see MAVEN_OPTS example below.
#
setenv JAVA_VERSION 1.6
setenv JAVA_HOME /System/Library/Frameworks/JavaVM.framework/Versions/1.6/Home
setenv GROOVY_HOME /Applications/Dev/groovy
setenv GRAILS_HOME /Applications/Dev/grails
setenv NEXUS_HOME /Applications/Dev/nexus/nexus-webapp
setenv JRUBY_HOME /Applications/Dev/jruby

setenv ANT_HOME /Applications/Dev/apache-ant
setenv ANT_OPTS -Xmx512M

setenv MAVEN_OPTS "-Xmx1024M -XX:MaxPermSize=512m"
setenv M2_HOME /Applications/Dev/apache-maven

setenv JMETER_HOME /Applications/Dev/jakarta-jmeter

4) Save your changes in VI and reboot your Mac. Or use the grep/xargs command show in the code comment above.

5) Prove that your variables are working by opening a Terminal window and typing export and you should see your new variables. These will also be available in IntelliJ and other GUI apps you launch via Spotlight.

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3  
I'm saying that the accepted answer (environment.plist) has not been successful for me. I've successfully used the launchd.conf approach on 10.5 and 10.6 on four machines. –  Matthew McCullough Jan 19 '10 at 23:53
30  
Is there any way of doing this without doing a system reboot? –  sorin Feb 5 '10 at 14:18
34  
The limitation mentioned above applies to MacOS X 10.5. However MacOS X 10.6 does not have this limitation anymore and setting the values inside environment.plist works fine even for apps launched via spotlight. So the selected answer is correct for Snow Leopard ;-) –  Louis Jacomet Jun 9 '10 at 14:54
4  
Setting launchd.conf is one way, but needs a reboot (to restart launchd). If you want to avoid a reboot, see my answer stackoverflow.com/questions/135688/… –  Matt Curtis Sep 21 '10 at 1:25
16  
There are several problems with the presented launchd approach. Most are specific to the PATH environment variable, but the asker did mention PATH specifically. 1) items in launchd.conf do not get applied in interactive shells such as ssh into the system. 2) having the line "setenv PATH /testdir" appends to the PATH in Terminal.app, but blows away all other PATH items in OS X Applications' Environments. 3)Doing "setenv PATH ${PATH}:/testdir" in /etc/launchd.conf doesn't properly expand existing $PATH 4)launchd.conf applies to all users, instead of just one. Not that I have any better soln. –  NoahR Dec 9 '11 at 1:43

Setting the environment for new processes started by Spotlight

You can set the environment used by launchd (and, by extension, anything started from Spotlight) with launchctl setenv. For example to set the path:

launchctl setenv PATH /opt/local/bin:/opt/local/sbin:/usr/bin:/bin:/usr/sbin:/sbin

Or if you want to set up your path in .bashrc or similar, then have it mirrored in launchd:

PATH=/opt/local/bin:/opt/local/sbin:/usr/bin:/bin:/usr/sbin:/sbin
launchctl setenv PATH $PATH

There's no need to reboot though you will need to restart an app if you want it to pick up the changed environment.

This includes any shells already running under Terminal.app, although if you're there you can set the environment more directly, e.g. with export PATH=/opt/local/bin:/opt/local/sbin:$PATH for bash or zsh.

Changes will be lost after a reboot

To keep changes after a reboot you can set the environment variables from /etc/launchd.conf, like so:

setenv PATH /opt/local/bin:/opt/local/sbin:/usr/bin:/bin:/usr/sbin:/sbin

launchd.conf is executed automatically when you reboot.

If you want these changes to take effect now, you should use this command to reprocess launchctl.conf (thanks @mklement for the tip!)

egrep -v '^\s*#' /etc/launchd.conf | launchctl

You can find out more about launchctl and how it loads launchd.conf with the command man launchctl.

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1  
Very nice one! The advantage of using environment.plist though seems to be that OS X honours the contents of that files without the hassle of having to fire up a terminal first. Anyway, I think your answer mainly concentrated on avoiding the necessity of a reboot, so thx for that. –  fotNelton Sep 27 '10 at 8:51
1  
@kapuzineralex Yes it avoids a reboot, also it changes the environment for programs started from Spotlight, which environment.plist does not do. –  Matt Curtis Sep 29 '10 at 3:22
2  
Setting environment on this way did work for me only till I rebooted. The environment variable did not last after I rebooted the mac. Matthew's answer worked perfectly for me. –  Shamal Karunarathne Aug 19 '11 at 4:08
6  
@Shamal: I +1'd your comment but bear in mind Matthew's answer requires a reboot, whereas I am pointing out the correct way to change it without a reboot. If you want both, I suggest you put your path settings in launchd.conf (so they persist across reboots), and then use a script with something like this "source /etc/launchctl.conf ; launchctl setenv PATH $PATH", so you can also "refresh" when you don't want to reboot. –  Matt Curtis Aug 22 '11 at 5:00
2  
this works fine, but must be executed each time after the machine is booted. And if one set 'PATH' this does not take this appears to be a special case. - is there a way to have this automatic per user ?? and is there a way to do this with PATH such that it will be inherited by XCode and tus the makefiles and scripts it invokes ?? –  peterk Oct 9 '11 at 23:10

Up to and including Lion (10.7) you can set them in

~/.MacOSX/environment.plist

See:

For PATH in the Terminal, you should be able to set in .bash_profile or .profile (you'll probably have to create it though)

For Mountain lion and beyond you need to use launchd and launchctl

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thanks John...just beat me :) –  tim_yates Sep 25 '08 at 20:13
4  
This is only if you actually expect them to be used by graphical apps. Since these don't typically use environment variables, it's not a very good place to set them. –  Chris Hanson Sep 25 '08 at 21:33
14  
There's some very good examples of graphical apps that use environment variables. IntelliJ for example, likes to be able to see M2_HOME to know where Maven lives. To get it to see the variable, you'll need to set it in /etc/launchd.conf instead of environment.plist. –  Matthew McCullough Feb 26 '09 at 3:58
3  
For reference: using preferences.plist was less than ideal with OS X 10.5 since at that time preferences.plist was not read for applications launched through spotlight, see comment by Louis to Matthew's answer and email.esm.psu.edu/pipermail/macosx-emacs/2010-May/002113.html . For OS X 10.6 environment.plist works just like it should. –  Janus Sep 14 '10 at 1:36
15  
This is no longer applicable to OSX 10.8 apple.stackexchange.com/questions/57385/… –  thatsmydoing Aug 23 '12 at 4:24

1.

vim ~/.bash_profile

The file may not exist (if not, you can just create it).

2.type in this and save the file:

export PATH=$PATH:YOUR_PATH_HERE

3.run

source ~/.bash_profile
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+1 export is what I was going to suggest, since BASH doesn't support setenv –  vol7ron Jun 10 '12 at 23:17
    
You have a typo, the above should say ~/.bash_profile. –  Andrew Ferrier Dec 18 '13 at 14:04
7  
This only works for Terminal.app. –  fossilet Feb 21 at 3:50

There are essentially two problems to solve when dealing with environment variables in OS X. The first is when invoking programs from Spotlight (the magnifying glass icon on the right side of the Mac menu/status bar) and the second when invoking programs from the Dock. Invoking programs from a Terminal application/utility is trivial because it reads the environment from the standard shell locations (~/.profile, ~/.bash_profile, ~/.bashrc, etc.)

When invoking programs from the Dock, use ~/.MacOSX/environment.plist where the <dict> element contains a sequence of <key>KEY</key><string>theValue</string> elements.

When invoking programs from Spotlight, insure that launchd has been setup with all the key/value settings you require.

To solve both problems simultaneously, I use a login item (set via the System Preferences tool) on my User account. The login item is a bash script that invokes an Emacs lisp function although one can of course use their favorite scripting tool to accomplish the same thing. This approach has the added benefit that it works at any time and does not require a reboot, i.e. one can edit ~/.profile, run the login item in some shell and have the changes visible for newly invoked programs, from either the Dock or Spotlight.

Details:

Login item: ~/bin/macosx-startup

#!/bin/bash
bash -l -c "/Applications/Emacs.app/Contents/MacOS/Emacs --batch -l ~/lib/emacs/elisp/macosx/environment-support.el -f generate-environment"

Emacs lisp function: ~/lib/emacs/elisp/macosx/envionment-support.el

;;; Provide support for the environment on Mac OS X

(defun generate-environment ()
  "Dump the current environment into the ~/.MacOSX/environment.plist file."
  ;; The system environment is found in the global variable:
  ;; 'initial-environment' as a list of "KEY=VALUE" pairs.
  (let ((list initial-environment)
        pair start command key value)
    ;; clear out the current environment settings
    (find-file "~/.MacOSX/environment.plist")
    (goto-char (point-min))
    (setq start (search-forward "<dict>\n"))
    (search-forward "</dict>")
    (beginning-of-line)
    (delete-region start (point))
    (while list
      (setq pair (split-string (car list) "=")
            list (cdr list))
      (setq key (nth 0 pair)
            value (nth 1 pair))
      (insert "  <key>" key "</key>\n")
      (insert "  <string>" value "</string>\n")

      ;; Enable this variable in launchd
      (setq command (format "launchctl setenv %s \"%s\"" key value))
      (shell-command command))
    ;; Save the buffer.
    (save-buffer)))

NOTE: This solution is an amalgam of those coming before I added mine, particularly that offered by Matt Curtis, but I have deliberately tried to keep my ~/.bash_profile content platform independent and put the setting of the launchd environment (a Mac only facility) into a separate script.

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8  
Wow. I'm not saying this won't work, but ... I'm just appalled at the complexity required to get a consistent environment on OS X. –  offby1 Jun 7 '13 at 17:00
2  
This works the best out of all the solutions I've seen for 10.9. The only flaw is that, since login items run in an indeterminate order, if Emacs (for example) is launched at login (because it was open at logout, for example), it won't necessarily have the environment variables unless you restart it, because it's launched before your script is. –  telotortium Jan 6 at 8:05

Another, free, opensource, Mac OSX Mountain Lion (10.8) Preference pane/environment.plist solution is EnvPane.

EnvPane's source code available on Github. EnvPane looks like it has comparable features to RCEnvironment, however, it seems it can update its stored variables instantly, i.e. without the need for a restart or login, which is welcome.

As stated by the developer:

EnvPane is a preference pane for Mac OS X 10.8 (Mountain Lion) that lets you set environment variables for all programs in both graphical and terminal sessions. Not only does it restore support for ~/.MacOSX/environment.plist in Mountain Lion, it also publishes your changes to the environment immediately, without the need to log out and back in.
<SNIP>
EnvPane includes (and automatically installs) a launchd agent that runs 1) early after login and 2) whenever the ~/.MacOSX/environment.plist changes. The agent reads ~/.MacOSX/environment.plist and exports the environment variables from that file to the current user's launchd instance via the same API that is used by launchctl setenv and launchctl unsetenv.

Disclaimer: I am in no way related to the developer or his/her project.

P.S. I like the name (sounds like 'Ends Pain').

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EnvPane can't set PATH at the moment. For more details see my bug report: github.com/hschmidt/EnvPane/issues/5 –  Uwe Günther Mar 25 '13 at 4:39
    
Good Answer..:) –  Dilip Rajkumar Jun 21 '13 at 12:34
    
I ♥️ this thing.. Only drawback.. which I think ANY solution will be a victim of.. is - having to restart a process - to inherit the new "environment". Wonk wonk. –  alex gray May 7 at 23:16
1  
Doesn't work on OS X 10.10 –  sorin Jul 17 at 8:19

After chasing the Environment Variables preference pane and discovering that the link is broken and a search on Apple's site seems to indicate they've forgotten about it... I started back onto the trail of the elusive launchd process.

On my system (Mac OS X 10.6.8) it appears that variables defined in environment.plist are being reliably exported to apps launched from Spotlight (via launchd). My trouble is that those vars are not being exported to new bash sessions in Terminal. I.e. I have the opposite problem as portrayed here.

NOTE: environment.plist looks like JSON, not XML, as described previously

I was able to get Spotlight apps to see the vars by editing ~/MacOSX/environment.plist and I was able to force the same vars into a new Terminal session by adding the following to my .profile file:

eval $(launchctl export)
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2  
Not that elusive: RCenvironment –  Gilimanjaro Oct 26 '11 at 13:15
    
Nice tip about launchctl export. But I wouldn't put that as-is into .profile. It will overwrite your $PATH with one that doesn't include /usr/local/bin. But you can use a regex to select the vars you are interested in: ``eval $(launchctl export | grep '^my.*='). –  mivk Jul 12 '12 at 17:13
3  
On my new Mountain Lion machine (10.8.2) the environment.plist is completely worthless. See Matthew's answer for the right track. It's all about launched and the launchctl command-line app along with /etc/launchd.conf. You can read up yourself with man launchd, man launchctl, and man launchd.conf in a terminal window. Glad Apple keeps the man pages up to date, even if the Mac Developer Library lags a bit. –  Russell B Jan 18 '13 at 22:39

On Mountain Lion all the /etc/paths and /etc/launchd.conf editing doesn't take any effect!

Apple's Developer Forums say:

"Change the Info.plist of the .app itself to contain an "LSEnvironment" dictionary with the environment variables you want.

~/.MacOSX/environment.plist is no longer supported."

So I directly edited the app's Info.plist (right click on "AppName.app" (in this case SourceTree) and then "Show package contents")

Show Package Contents

and added a new key/dict pair called:

<key>LSEnvironment</key>
<dict>
     <key>PATH</key>
     <string>/Users/flori/.rvm/gems/ruby-1.9.3-p362/bin:/Users/flori/.rvm/gems/ruby-1.9.3-p362@global/bin:/Users/flori/.rvm/rubies/ruby-1.9.3-p326/bin:/Users/flori/.rvm/bin:/usr/bin:/bin:/usr/sbin:/sbin:/usr/local/bin:</string>
</dict>

(see: LaunchServicesKeys Documentation at Apple)

enter image description here

now the App (in my case SourceTree) uses the given path and works with git 1.9.3 :-)

PS: Of course you have to adjust the Path entry to your specific path needs.

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2  
This solution meets the standard of least intrusive on the system. Thanks. –  John Vance Sep 9 '13 at 19:29
    
@John Vance +1 Totally agree, system-wide changes are always risky as Jason T. Miller explains clearly in his answer –  rmcsharry Jun 22 at 4:42

Sometimes all of the previous answers simply don't work. If you want to have access to a system variable (like M2_HOME) in Eclipse or in IntelliJ the only thing that works for me in this case is:

First (step 1) edit /etc/launchd.conf to contain a line like this: "setenv VAR value" and then (step 2) reboot.

Simply modifying .bash_profile won't work because in osx the applications are not started as in other UNIX'es, they don't inherit the parents shell variables. All the other modifications won't work for a reason that is unknown to me. Maybe someone else can clarify about this.

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4  
Applications started from Spotlight or by any other means all have /etc/launchd.conf read by their parent process, thus making that an appealing choice for where to set environment variables visible in all apps and shells. –  Matthew McCullough Feb 26 '09 at 3:51
1  
See my answer for another solution, which avoids a reboot - stackoverflow.com/questions/135688/… –  Matt Curtis Sep 29 '10 at 3:24
    
My MaxOS 10.6 machine does not have the /etc/launchd.conf file present. Is this either a new or an obsolete thing as of this version ? Or is this machine messed up ? –  peterk Oct 9 '11 at 23:41

I think what the OP is looking for is a simple, windows-like solution.

here ya go:

http://www.apple.com/downloads/macosx/system_disk_utilities/environmentvariablepreferencepane.html

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2  
Still available at RCenvironment –  Gilimanjaro Oct 26 '11 at 13:14
    
Wow. RCEnvironment is killer. Thank you Gilimanjaro !!! –  B-Money Jun 19 '12 at 20:55

While the answers here aren't "wrong", I'll add another: never make environment variable changes in OS X that affect "all processes", or even, outside the shell, for all processes run interactively by a given user.

In my experience, global changes to environment variables like PATH for all processes are even more likely to break things on OS X than on Windows. Reason being, lots of OS X applications and other software (including, perhaps especially, components of the OS itself) rely on UNIX command-line tools under the hood, and assume the behavior of the versions of these tools provided with the system, and don't necessarily use absolute paths when doing so (similar comments apply to dynamically-loaded libraries and DYLD_* environment variables). Consider, for instance, that the highest-rated answers to various Stack Overflow questions about replacing OS X-supplied versions of interpreters like Python and Ruby generally say "don't do this."

OS X is really no different than other UNIX-like operating systems (e.g., Linux, FreeBSD, and Solaris) in this respect; the most likely reason Apple doesn't provide an easy way to do this is because it breaks things. To the extent Windows isn't as prone to these problems, it's due to two things: (1) Windows software doesn't tend to rely on command-line tools to the extent that UNIX software does, and (2) Microsoft has had such an extensive history of both "DLL hell" and security problems caused by changes that affect all processes that they've changed the behavior of dynamic loading in newer Windows versions to limit the impact of "global" configuration options like PATH.

"Lame" or not, you'll have a far more stable system if you restrict such changes to smaller scopes.

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Any of the Bash startup files -- ~/.bashrc, ~/.bash_profile, ~/.profile. There's also some sort of weird file named ~/.MacOSX/environment.plist for environment variables in GUI applications.

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Much like the answer Matt Curtis gave, I set environment variables via launchctl, but I wrap it in a function called export, so that whenever I export a variable like normal in my .bash_profile, it is also set by launchctl. Here is what I do:

  1. My .bash_profile consists solely of one line, (This is just personal preference.)

    source .bashrc
    
  2. My .bashrc has this:

    function export()
    {
        builtin export "$@"
        if [[ ${#@} -eq 1 && "${@//[^=]/}" ]]
        then
            launchctl setenv "${@%%=*}" "${@##*=}"
        elif [[ ! "${@//[^ ]/}" ]]
        then
            launchctl setenv "${@}" "${!@}"
        fi
    }
    
    export -f export
    
  3. The above will overload the Bash builtin "export" and will export everything normally (you'll notice I export "export" with it!), then properly set them for OS X app environments via launchctl, whether you use any of the following:

    export LC_CTYPE=en_US.UTF-8
    # ~$ launchctl getenv LC_CTYPE
    # en_US.UTF-8
    PATH="/usr/local/bin:${PATH}"
    PATH="/usr/local/opt/coreutils/libexec/gnubin:${PATH}"
    export PATH
    # ~$ launchctl getenv PATH
    # /usr/local/opt/coreutils/libexec/gnubin:/usr/local/bin:/usr/bin:/bin:/usr/sbin:/sbin:/usr/local/bin
    
  4. This way I don't have to send every variable to launchctl every time, and I can just have my .bash_profile / .bashrc set up the way I want. Open a terminal window, check out your environment variables you're interested in with launchctl getenv myVar, change something in your .bash_profile/.bashrc, close the terminal window and re-open it, check the variable again with launchctl, and voilá, it's changed.

  5. Again, like the other solutions for the post-Mountain Lion world, for any new environment variables to be available for apps, you need to launch or re-launch them after the change.

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the $PATH variable is also subject to path_helper, which in turn makes use of the /etc/paths file and files in /etc/paths.d.

A more thorough description can be found here: http://hea-www.harvard.edu/~fine/OSX/path_helper.html

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Here is a very simple way to do what you want. In my case, it was getting gradle to work (for Android Studio)

  • Open up Terminal.
  • Run the following command:

    sudo nano /etc/paths

  • Enter your password, when prompted.

  • Go to the bottom of the file, and enter the path you wish to add.
  • Hit control-x to quit.
  • Enter 'Y' to save the modified buffer.
  • Open a new terminal window then type:

    echo $PATH

You should see the new path appended to the end of the PATH

I got these details from this post:

http://architectryan.com/2012/10/02/add-to-the-path-on-mac-os-x-mountain-lion/#.UkED3rxPp3Q

I hope that can help someone else

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for a single user modification, use ~/.profile of the ones you listed, the following link explains when the different files are read by bash

http://telin.ugent.be/~slippens/drupal/bashrc_and_others

if you want to set the environment variable for gui applications you need the ~/.MacOSX/environment.plist file

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well, I'm unsure about /etc/paths and ~/.MacOSX/environment.plist those are new.

But with bash, you should know that .bashrc is executed with every new shell invocation and .bash_profile is only executed once at startup. Don't know how often this is with macos, I think the distinction has broken down with the window system launching everything.

Personally, I eliminate the confusion by creating a .bashrc with everything I need and then do:

ln -s .bashrc .bash_profile
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One thing to note in addition to the approaches suggested is that, in OS X 10.5 at least, the variables set in launchd.conf will be merged with the settings made in .profile. I suppose this is likely to be valid for the settings in ~/.MacOSX/environment.plist too, but I haven't verified.

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I provided a solution to this problem on superuser. It is quite similar to this and this solution, but doen't require to edit a system file as in the first case, and is "permanent" in contrast to the second.

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Setup your PATH environment variable on Mac OS

Open the Terminal program (this is in your Applications/Utilites folder by default). Run the following command touch ~/.bash_profile; open ~/.bash_profile This will open the file in the your default text editor.

For ANDROID SDK as example :

You need to add the path to your Android SDK platform-tools and tools directory. In my example I will use "/Development/android-sdk-macosx" as the directory the SDK is installed in. Add the following line:

export PATH=${PATH}:/Development/android-sdk-macosx/platform-tools:/Development/android-sdk-macosx/tools

Save the file and quit the text editor. Execute your .bash_profile to update your PATH.

source ~/.bash_profile

Now everytime you open the Terminal program you PATH will included the Android SDK.

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For Bash, try adding your environment variables to the file /etc/profile to make them available for all users. No need to reboot, just start a new Terminal session.

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It's simple:

Edit ~/.profile and put your variables as follow

$ vim ~/.profile

In file put:

MY_ENV_VAR=value

  1. Save ( :wq )

  2. Restart the terminal (Quit and open it again)

  3. Make sure that`s all be fine:

$ echo $MY_ENV_VAR

$ value


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It's quite simple, edit .profile (vi, nano, sublimeText or other text editor) file, you can found it at ~/ directory (user directory) and set like this :

export MY_VAR=[your value here]

exemple with java home :

export JAVA_HOME=/Library/Java/JavaVirtualMachines/current

save it and return to the terminal.

You can reload it with :

source .profileor close / open your terminal window.

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Just did this really easy and quick. First create a ~/.bash_profile from terminal:

touch .bash_profile

then

open -a TextEdit.app .bash_profile

add

export TOMCAT_HOME=/Library/Tomcat/Home

save documement and you are done.

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To be concise and clear about what each file is intended for

  • ~/.profile is sourced every time Terminal.app is launched
  • ~/.bashrc is where "traditionally" all the export statements for Bash environment are set
  • /etc/paths is the main file in Mac OS that contains the list of default paths for building the PATH environment variable for all users
  • /etc/paths.d/ contains files that hold additional search paths

Non-terminal programs don't inherit the system wide PATH and MANPATH variables that your terminal does! To set environment for all processes launched by a specific user, thus making environment variables available to Mac OS X GUI applications, those variables must be defined in your ~/.MacOSX/environment.plist (Apple Technical Q&A QA1067)

Use the following command line to synchronize your environment.plist with /etc/paths:

defaults write $HOME/.MacOSX/environment PATH "$(tr '\n' ':' </etc/paths)"
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