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Can annotation have complex return type, such as HashMap.

I am looking for something like:

@Retention(RetentionPolicy.RUNTIME)
@Target(ElementType.FIELD)
public @interface column {
    public HashMap<String, String> table();
}

so I can have a constant annotated like(pseudo code):

@column({table=(dbName, tableName), table=(dbName, tableName2)})
public static final String USER_ID = "userid";

If Annotation doesn't allow you to have complex return type, then any good practice for this kind of case?

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1 Answer 1

up vote 13 down vote accepted

No, annotation elements can only be primitive types, Strings, enum types, Class, other annotations, or arrays of any of these. The typical way to represent these kinds of structures would be to declare another annotation type

public @interface TableMapping {
  public String dbName();
  public String tableName();
}

then say

@Retention(RetentionPolicy.RUNTIME)
@Target(ElementType.FIELD)
public @interface column {
    public TableMapping[] table();
}

And us the annotation as

@column(table={
  @TableMapping(dbName="dbName", tableName="tableName"),
  @TableMapping(dbName="db2", tableName="table2")
})
public String userId = "userid";
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1  
Don't forget enums and classes –  Aleksander Blomskøld Nov 26 '12 at 16:37
    
@AleksanderBlomskøld good point, thanks. –  Ian Roberts Nov 26 '12 at 16:39
    
@IanRoberts I've done something similar, it's kinda annoying, if you use @ table only, even some of the column only has one TableMapping has to have @ table along with one @ TableMapping. If you start using @ table for fields having more than one tablemapping while using @ TableMapping for the columns having only one tablemapping. But the latter case will have a more complex method for retrieving eg. getColumnsInTableA(). –  Shengjie Nov 26 '12 at 16:45

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