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#include<stdio.h>
#include<string.h>

int main()
{
   char buffer[32];
   char c;
   int i;
   printf("input: ");
   fgets(buffer, 32, stdin);
   printf("items filled: %d\n", sscanf("%c%d\n", &c, &i));
   printf("%c%d\n", c, i);
   return 0;
}

When typing a character followed by a number "f7", im expecting "f" to go into variable c, and "7" to go into variable i. For some reason, sscanf() fails to fill both, and I'm getting their initial garbage values. What am I doing wrong?

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4 Answers 4

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Actual sscanf() signature is this :

int sscanf(const char *str, const char *format, ...);

check your signature of sscanf() you have used wrong signature

It should be

sscanf(buffer,"%c%d\n", &c, &i);
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That was a stupid mistake, Thank You! –  Innkeeper Nov 26 '12 at 17:22
    
you welcome , anytime –  Omkant Nov 26 '12 at 17:22

You're not using buffer in the sscanf() call, so they're not getting filled.

int i;
char c;
char buffer[32];
fgets(buffer, 32, stdin);
sscanf(buffer, "%c%d", &c, &i)
         ^
      you're missing this part
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Do not use sscanf. The correct way to do the parsing you are trying to do is

#include <stdlib.h>
#include <stdio.h>

// ...

char *endptr, buffer[32];
char c;
int i;

// ...

fgets(buffer, 32, stdin);
c = buffer[0];
i = strtol(buffer+1, &endptr, 10);

if (endptr == buffer+1 || (*endptr != '\0' && *endptr != '\n')) {
    puts("invalid input");
    return 1;
} else {
   printf("%c%d\n", c, i);
   return 0;
}
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A Major pet peeve of mine : You say correct when I'm sure you mean 'a better'. +1 anyway for a good answer. –  gbtimmon Nov 26 '12 at 17:23
    
@gbtimmon I actually do mean 'correct' in this case; the scanf functions provoke undefined behavior on numeric overflow [C99 7.19.6.2p10], which means it is, in fact, incorrect to use them to convert strings to numbers. –  Zack Nov 26 '12 at 17:27
    
So you are guaranteeing that no new or better solution will ever be found, that none of these functions will ever be deprecated and in the future that with 100% certainty this fits every possible situation? That's a pretty bold claim. –  gbtimmon Nov 26 '12 at 17:31
    
@gbtimmon I think that's an awfully high bar for calling something "correct"; don't you think it should be enough for the proposed solution to be the best among all not-incorrect options available right now? –  Zack Nov 26 '12 at 20:31

sscanf("%c%d\n", &c, &i) is never told to look in the buffer for c and i, it looks like you are making this call incorrectly.

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