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What do I have to write for YYY, ZZZ in order to set iterator_type to the iterator type associated with T ? It should work in Visual Studio C++ 2010, if possible (but general standard solution is ok as well).

template<class T>
struct iterator_for {
    typedef YYY<T>::ZZZ type;
}

Hence I want:

iterator_for<double[3]>::type is double *
iterator_for<std::string>::type is std::string::iterator
iterator_for<char[12]>::type is char *

etc.

I have a templated wrapper class Wrapper<T> storing something iterable (i.e. a container or string or an array) and I want to define a function returning an iterator pointing into the wrapped object. For that purpose, I need to be able to speak about the iterator type corresponding to T. For an array, the corresponding iterator would be a pointer, and for a string that is whatever string defines to be its iterator type.

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i guess you need to use SFINAE to check if iterator_type is declared inside T and if that failed - just typedef T* type –  user1773602 Nov 26 '12 at 17:20
    
Isn't that predefined anywhere? –  JohnB Nov 26 '12 at 17:24
2  
What is the bigger problem you are trying to solve? –  GManNickG Nov 26 '12 at 17:55
1  
You have to state your question more precisely. What you have now is inconsistent and, honestly, makes little sense. If iterator type for double * is double *, then why is it that for string it is suddenly string::iterator and not string *? What concept are you trying to implement? What is that iterator type is supposed to iterate over? –  AnT Nov 26 '12 at 17:59
    
Bigger problem: I have a templated wrapper class Wrapper<T> storing something iterable (i.e. a container or string or an array) and I want to define a function returning an iterator pointing into the wrapped object. For that purpose, I need to be able to speak about the iterator type corresponding to T. For an array, the corresponding iterator would be a pointer, and for a string that is whatever string defines to be its iterator type. –  JohnB Nov 26 '12 at 18:21

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

If you just want to separate containers from pointers, you can try this

template<class T>
struct iterator_for 
{
    typedef typename T::iterator  type;
};

template<class T>
struct iterator_for<T*>
{
    typedef T*  type;
};

template<class T, std::size_t N>
struct iterator_for<T (&)[N]>
{
    typedef T*  type;
};
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The Boost library already has this:

#include <boost/range.hpp>
#include <iostream>
#include <string>
#include <vector>

template <typename T> void print_list(const T& container) {
    typedef typename boost::range_iterator<const T>::type iter;
    for (iter i = boost::begin(container); i != boost::end(container); ++i)
        std::cout << *i << ";";
    std::cout << "\n";
}

int main() {
    double array[] = {1.0,2.0,3.0};
    std::string str = "Hello";
    std::vector<int> vec(3, 10);
    print_list(array);  // prints 1;2;3;
    print_list(str);    // prints H;e;l;l;o;
    print_list(vec);    // prints 10;10;10;
}
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Ok, one possibility probably is (in C++11, but does not work in VS 2010):

typedef typename std::remove_reference<
                    decltype ( 
                        begin ( std::declval<T> () )
                    )
                 >::type
        type;
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