Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm in the process of creating a library that powers a network of APIs. The center of that library is currently a Client class which each API client subclasses. Since I'm the one writing all my APIs, they'll all function similarly (restful, authorization through access_token, etc).

However unlike other ruby API Client libraries (Twitter's, etc), the client class should not be instantiated directly. That's because the library isn't restricted to a single API. Instead, each API client will subclass the Client class. My question is as follows:

Is there a way to require that a Ruby Class is only initialized through a subclass?

Additionally, in reading this question I decided that a class is better over a mixin here.

For those that want code, here's an example:

class A
    def initialize(options = {})
        #what goes on in here doesn't really matter for the purpose of this question
        #I just don't want it to be initialized directly
        options.each do |k,v|
            instance_variable_set("@#{k}",v) unless v.nil?
        end
    end
end

class B < A
    attr_accessor :class_specific_opt
    def initialize( options = {} )
        @class_specific_opt = "val" unless options[:class_specific_opt].nil?
        super(options)
    end
end

Any thoughts?

share|improve this question
    
If you do B.new, then B#initialize will be called, which will call A#initialize. A#initialize will not be called directly unless you do A.new. What is wrong with it? –  sawa Nov 26 '12 at 17:52
    
The issue is that someone could still theoretically call A#initialize –  Nick ONeill Nov 26 '12 at 18:38
    
initialize is a private method. You cannot call it with a receiver. –  sawa Nov 26 '12 at 19:08

5 Answers 5

up vote 2 down vote accepted

There's an answer here on abstract-like classes: How to implement an abstract class in ruby?, Though you may still be better off providing A as a module and including it in its implementors.

share|improve this answer

You could do something like this:

class A
  def self.initialize_allowed?
    raise "You cannot initialize instances of this class."
  end

  def self.allow_initialize
    class << self
      def initialize_allowed?
        true
      end
    end
  end

  def initialize(options = {})
    self.class.initialize_allowed?
    options.each do |k,v|
      instance_variable_set("@#{k}", v)
    end
  end
end

Calling A.new raises a RuntimeError and halts the initialize method. You can then override the initialized_allowed? method in subclasses by calling allow initialize on them. (maybe this is overkill, but I think allow_initialize is easier to read than def self.initialize_allowed?;end):

class B < A
  allow_initialize
end

B.new #=> #<B:0x00000102837d10>
share|improve this answer

If you don't want A.new to be called, simply do:

class <<A
  undef :new
end

Then, you will not be able to call it:

A.new #=> NoMethodError: undefined method `new' for A:Class
share|improve this answer

Add

private_class_method :new

to class A, and

public_class_method :new

to class B.

share|improve this answer

I think the best way would be to make the new method private. This is exactly what the ruby Singleton module does. Singleton Module Documentation

class A
  private_class_method :new
end

class B < A
  public_class_method :new
end
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.