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I'm trying to clean up my code for initializing static readonly variables.

Original:

public static readonly List<int> MyList;

//Initialize MyList in the static constructor
static MyObject() { ... }


I decided to clean it up because CodeAnalysis said I should not use the static constructor (CA1810).

Cleanup:

public static readonly List<int> MyList = GetMyList();

//Returns the list
private static List<int> GetMyList() { ... }


I didn't really like the additional method, so I figured I'd try to get it to be all inline, but it won't work. I'm not sure what I'm doing wrong here...

public static readonly List<int> MyList =
    () =>
       {
           ...

           return list;
       };

I attempted to take the code within the GetMyList() method and place it in an anonymous delegate to return the list to assign, but it says I'm attempting to convert a delegate into a List<int>?

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6 Answers 6

up vote 2 down vote accepted

This looks a little weird, but try this:

public static readonly List<int> MyList = new Func<List<int>>(
() =>
{
    // Create your list here
    return new List<int>();
})();

The trick is creating a new Func<List<int>> and invoking it.

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That is quite weird, perhaps it's best to keep it in a standard method then? –  michael Nov 26 '12 at 17:57
    
@michael Perhaps -- depends on what you think is more readable and maintainable. Are these values constant? Could you use public static readonly List<int> MyList = new List<int> { 1, 2, 3 }; ? –  Jon B Nov 26 '12 at 17:59
    
No, there's more to it than that, otherwise inlining it would be super easy. –  michael Nov 26 '12 at 18:04

The reason is that when you write

() =>
   {
       ...

       return list;
   };

You're actually declaring a delegate - a function that returns List<int>, but you're not actually invoking that function, and therefore this evaluates to Func<List<int>> and not to List<int>.

I'm not quite sure why you're trying to remove your static constructor though. Static constructors have their uses, and in some cases even make the code cleaner and more readable.

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+1. Yes, to get result one needs to call function... also I prefer separate function for it. "iffe" looks more natural in JavaScript :) –  Alexei Levenkov Nov 26 '12 at 17:57

It says right. () => ... returns a delegate. But you need a list. For that reason you must call this delegate and have result.

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it says I'm attempting to convert a delegate into a List<int>

That's because you are. Remember that defining the lambda isn't the same as invoking the lambda. You'd have to be doing something more like this:

Func<List<int>> createList = () => { ... return list; };
MyList = createList();
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You should immediately invoke it for it to become a list:

public static readonly List<int> MyList = new Func<List<int>>(() => {
    return new List<int>();
})(); //<-- the parentheses that invoke

The Syntax in C# for this is so iffy that it's probably best to go with separate invocation or method.

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As many have stated, plain () => { ... } returns a delegate or Expression. I think creating a separate private static method for the list initialization makes a slightly more readable code than () => { ... }() or () => { ... }.Invoke()

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