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When I'm testing with Mocha, I often have a combination of both asynchronous and synchronous tests that need to run.

Mocha handles this beautifully allowing me to specify a callback, done, whenever my tests are asynchronous.

My question is, how does Mocha internally observe my tests and know that it should wait for asynchronous activity? It seems to wait anytime I have the callback parameter defined in my test functions. You can see in the examples below, the first test should timeout, the second should proceed and finish before user.save calls the anonymous function.

// In an async test that doesn't call done, mocha will timeout.
describe('User', function(){
  describe('#save()', function(){
    it('should save without error', function(done){
      var user = new User('Luna');
      user.save(function(err){
        if (err) throw err;
      });
    })
  })
})

// The same test without done will proceed without timing out.
describe('User', function(){
  describe('#save()', function(){
    it('should save without error', function(){
      var user = new User('Luna');
      user.save(function(err){
        if (err) throw err;
      });
    })
  })
})

Is this node.js specific magic? Is this something that can be done in any Javascript?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 9 down vote accepted

This is simple pure Javascript magic.

Functions are in fact objects, and they have properties (such as the number of parameters are defined with the function).

Look at how this.async is set in mocha/lib/runnable.js

function Runnable(title, fn) {
  this.title = title;
  this.fn = fn;
  this.async = fn && fn.length;
  this.sync = ! this.async;
  this._timeout = 2000;
  this._slow = 75;
  this.timedOut = false;
}

Mocha's logic changes based whether or not your function is defined with parameters.

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This is correct, with the exact example. Check out George's answer below to see the docs on the length function for Functions. –  Paul English Nov 26 '12 at 18:15

What you're looking for is Function's length property which can tell how many arguments a function is expecting. When you define a callback with done it can tell and treats it asynchonously.

function it(str, cb){
  if(cb.length > 0)
    //async
  else
    //sync
}

https://developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/JavaScript/Reference/Global_Objects/Function/Length

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1  
Thanks, it looks like this is done here in the mocha source code. And an example for reference, var fn1 = function() {};assert.equal(fn1.length, 0);var fn2 = function(param) {};assert.equal(fn2.length, 1) –  Paul English Nov 26 '12 at 18:10

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