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C# ?: Conditional Operator

Could someone explain me what does ":" do in this situation?

var skupaj = dni + zacetniDan + (((dni + zacetniDan) % 7 != 0) ? 7 - ((dni + zacetniDan) % 7) : 0);
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marked as duplicate by John Saunders, Kate Gregory, raina77ow, Michal Klouda, Justin Satyr Nov 26 '12 at 22:01

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

5  
Ternary Operator –  birryree Nov 26 '12 at 18:15
1  
?: Operator –  John Saunders Nov 26 '12 at 19:01

7 Answers 7

: is part of a Ternary Operator. It is shortcode for an if/else clause.

Example: int a = b > 5 ? 2 : 3;

is the same as:

int a = 0;
if (b > 5)
{
    a = 2;
}
else
{
    a = 3;
}
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1  
It's not actually shorthand for an if/else. They're semantically rather different. The conditional operator is resolved to a value, whereas an if/else clause is not; it exists purely for the side effects caused by the statements of the if or else sections. While it's not germane to the example you gave, it can have implications in terms of local variable lifetime, for example. So while it's useful to think of the conditional operator as exapanded to an if/else, they're not the same. –  Servy Nov 26 '12 at 18:40
    
@Servy Could you give an example of where it makes a difference. I'm having a little trouble wrapping my head around it. Thanks! –  Tom Kiley Nov 26 '12 at 19:01
1  
@TomKiley int result = Math.Sign(isTrue ? -1 : 1);. To write that with an if/else you'd need to create a local variable to compute the parameter to pass to Sign. Currently an invisible local variable is being created, but it can (and most likely will) have a lifetime shorter than the method itself. To use an if/else you'd likely need to scope the variable for the entire method. Next consider doing that at the level of a class variable (in which case it might matter more) private int result = Math.Sign(true ? -1 : 1);. To do that with an if/else you'd need to use a constructor. –  Servy Nov 26 '12 at 19:18
    
@Servy Thank you! That made me think of some more questions about when in the creation of an object Math.Sign(true ? -1 : 1); would be executed in the latter example, but I think that's a whole different question. –  Tom Kiley Nov 27 '12 at 4:04

It's a ternary operator.

It is shorthand for the following equivalent of your code:

int skupaj = dni + zacetniDan;

if ((dni + zacetniDan) % 7 != 0) {
    skupaj += 7 - ((dni + zacetniDan) % 7);
}
else {
    skupaj += 0;
}
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? : is conditional operator short form for if / then / else

The first part is condition should be evaluated to boolean its before the ? The expression after ? is then part and is returned when condition is ture and the expression after : is else part and is returned when condition is evaluated to false

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1  
+1 for being the only answer (of 7) to use the correct name for the ?: operator. –  Servy Nov 26 '12 at 18:36

(((dni + zacetniDan) % 7 != 0) ? 7 - ((dni + zacetniDan) % 7) : 0);

This is a ternary expression Condition?Expr1:Expr2

The result of the expression is the result of Expr1 if Condition is true and the result of Expr2 otherwise.

In your particular case condition is

 ((dni + zacetniDan) % 7 != 0)

If this condition is true, the result of the ternary subexpression will be

 7 - ((dni + zacetniDan) % 7)

Otherwise 0.

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Ternary operator. It allows you to treat a conditional value as a single value.

here's a rudimentary example converting a boolean to a string

string str = myBool ? "true" : "false";

which is equivalent to

string str
if(myBool)
    str = "true";
else
    str = "false";
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Thats the ternary operator: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ty67wk28(v=vs.80).aspx

if (dni + zacetniDan) % 7 != 0) is true then evaluate to 7 - ((dni + zacetniDan) % 7) else evaluate to 0

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You can easily understand a line with ? and : by splitting in 3.

  • The term on the left of ? is the condition
  • The term between ? and : is what should be used if the condition is true
  • The term after : is what should be used if the condition is false
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