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I have my UI and other Thread, where there is loop:

while(true){

}

I am checking changes of String value in the system, and when changes, I send message via pre-opened socket to the server. Problem is, when applying loop, my app freezes, and CPU load is very high (about 90 %). I know, infinite loop must not be done in thread, but do you know how to copy this behavior, not using infinite loop?

Thx

Main Code (onCreate method):

    mProgressDialog = ProgressDialog.show(main.this, "loading","loading", true);
    c=new Client(this.getApplicationContext(), "192.168.0.121", 3333);
    c.start();

    CLIENT_MESSAGE="login user2 user2";
    synchronized(c){
        c.notify();
    }
    Client.zHandler.setEmptyMessage(119);


    mHandler = new Handler()
    {
        public void handleMessage(android.os.Message msg)
        {
            super.handleMessage(msg);

            switch (msg.what)
            {
                case 11:
                    Log.d("Logged in", "login");
                    mProgressDialog.dismiss();
                    break;
                case 12:    
                    Log.d("Logged out", "logout and end");
                    mProgressDialog.dismiss();
                    finish();
                    break;

                        }
                 }
          };

  @Override
public boolean onKeyDown(int keyCode, KeyEvent event) {
    switch (keyCode) {

    case KeyEvent.KEYCODE_BACK:
        CLIENT_MESSAGE="logout";
        synchronized (c) {
            c.notify();
        }
                    Client.zHandler.setEmptyMessage(129)
        break;
    default:

    }
    return true;
}

Thread Code (Client.java):

public Client(Context ctx, String hostname, int port){
    this.ctx=ctx;
    this.hostname=hostname;
    this.port=port;

    zHandler = new Handler()
    {
        public void handleMessage(android.os.Message msg)
        {
            super.handleMessage(msg);

            switch (msg.what)
            {
                case 119://login
                    Log.d("119", "case 119");
                    messageText=DropboxFileClientActivity.CLIENT_MESSAGE;
                    main.mHandler.sendEmptyMessage(11);
                    break;
                case 129://logout
                    messageText=DropboxFileClientActivity.CLIENT_MESSAGE;
                    main.mHandler.sendEmptyMessage(12);
                    break;
                case 100:   
                    break;

                        }
                 }
          };
}
    public void run(){
      try {
        clientSocket = new Socket(hostname, port);
        //inputLine = new BufferedReader(new InputStreamReader(System.in));

        os = new ObjectOutputStream (clientSocket.getOutputStream());

        is = new ObjectInputStream(clientSocket.getInputStream());
    }
    catch (UnknownHostException e) {
        Log.d("ERROR", "unknown host "+hostname); 
    }
    catch (IOException e) {
        Log.d("ERROR2", "no bind"+hostname);
        e.printStackTrace();
    }

    while (!isInterrupted()) {
        try{
            synchronized (this) {
                wait();
            }
        } catch (InterruptedException e) {
            break; // interrupting the thread ends it
        }
        if (clientSocket != null && os != null && is != null &&!messageText.equals("")) {
                messageText="";
                //sending message to server, getting reply and displaying it to the screen
            } 
      }//endwhile loop

   }
share|improve this question
2  
I think in your case, an infinite loop is appropriate. The problem is that you're checking in a very tight loop - far more often than you need to check. How fast do you need to respond to the value change? Maybe adding a Thread.sleep() with a pause of maybe 500 milliseconds would be fast enough, and give the rest of the system room to operate. –  Todd Sjolander Nov 26 '12 at 18:27
    
Some context would be nice. What's the string value whose changes you are waiting for? Perhaps there's a solution without a busy loop? –  Johannes Weiß Nov 26 '12 at 18:31
    
I am waiting to message, user enters. When message is entered in UI, I notify via handler working thread, where execution of sending message to server happens –  Waypoint Nov 26 '12 at 18:34
    
@Waypoint is the message entered into an EditText? –  Raghav Sood Nov 26 '12 at 18:42
    
@Raghav - nope, UI thread generate it, it is just a normal String –  Waypoint Nov 26 '12 at 19:38

2 Answers 2

If your loop is, indeed, running in a separate thread, then the problem is that it is a CPU hog.

Rather than polling to check for changes to a String value, it would be much better (if you have control over the relevant code) to write a setter that triggers the server updates from the other thread (with, say, a wait/notify protocol).

Even if you have to poll, do you really need to do it at CPU speeds? Perhaps once a second would do? That would let you sleep the rest of the time.

At the very least, call Thread.yield() every time through the loop.

EDIT Based on your comment to the post, you should be waiting in the background thread:

In your background thread:

while (!isInterrupted()) {
    synchronized (this) {
        wait();
    } catch (InterruptedException e) {
        break; // interrupting the thread ends it
    }
    // read string and send it to the server
}

In your event handler:

public void onSomethingHappened(...) {
    // update the string
    synchronized (mThread) {
        mThread.notify();
    }
}

The string should be marked volatile unless the read and update are synchronized on the same object.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, I am trying to use it in my code, I am starting my thread as a part of a object - Client c=new Client(); c.start(); when I am using notify method, it says to me to lock the object c, how to do so? –  Waypoint Nov 26 '12 at 19:52
    
@Waypoint - Ah. My Mistake. You need to wrap the call to notify() in a synchronized block. I updated my code to show what I mean. (In your code, you would probably synchronize on c instead of mThread.) –  Ted Hopp Nov 26 '12 at 20:54
    
Thanks for your effort. I have implemented it in my code. BUt I still have no success. When I notify for the first time when string changes, nothing happens to the server, when I sent message for the second time, first is send and resolved and second isn't send –  Waypoint Nov 27 '12 at 6:17
    
@Waypoint - Sounds like a sequencing error in the logic. You'll need to post your code to get help sorting it out. –  Ted Hopp Nov 27 '12 at 6:47
    
Ok, I have added source code into my question –  Waypoint Nov 27 '12 at 7:11

Doing

synchronized(blah){
    blah.wait();
}

Is the old way of doing synchronization. Look at some of the classes in the java.util.concurrent package.

An example would be, in your activity you can implement/add a TextWatcher and in the method you can

blockingQueue.put(theChangedText) //preferably you would do the put via an access method.

and then in your thread you would have roughly:

obj = blockingQueue.take()
sendToServer(obj)
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