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i need generate number values and uses that values on curl. i have done this but the code have some faults because can't generate the numbers.

#!/bin/bash

for a in $(seq 0 9)
do
pass[0]="$a"
   for b in $(seq 0 9)
   do
   pass[1]="$b"
        for c in $(seq 0 9)
        do
        pass[2]="$c"
            for d in $(seq 0 9)
            do
            pass[3]="$d"
                for e in $(seq 0 9)
                do
                pass[4]="$e"
                    for f in $(seq 0 9)
                    do
                    pass[5]="$f"
                   curl -d "$a$b$c$d$e$f" somesite.php
                    done
                done
             done
         done    
     done
done

i get this output:

   echo ${pass[*}
>                     done
> 
Display all 289 possibilities? (y or n)
> e
>              done
>          done    
>      done
> done
> ^C
share|improve this question
    
Are you trying to a DoS attack on site? –  iiSeymour Nov 26 '12 at 18:33
    
is not a DoS and is for an university research. –  user09120390123 Nov 26 '12 at 18:35

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Simpler (but still ghastly):

for a in $(seq 0 9)
do
    for b in $(seq 0 9)
    do
        for c in $(seq 0 9)
        do
            for d in $(seq 0 9)
            do
                for e in $(seq 0 9)
                do
                    for f in $(seq 0 9)
                    do
                        curl -d "$a$b$c$d$e$f" somesite.php
                    done
                done
            done
        done    
    done
done

I'm not convinced that the script you copied to the question is the one you executed. When I do run your script, it executes commands like:

curl -d 0 2 0 8 7 9 somesite.php

Note the spaces; I suspect they are (a) unwanted and (b) largely unavoidable without futzing with IFS, which is worse than fixing the code as I showed. Arrays are great; they aren't for everything.

Incidentally, it would be simpler (by far) to use:

for number in $(seq -f '%06.0f' 0 1000000)
do
    curl -d "$number" somesite.php
done

or:

seq -f '%06.0f' 0 1000000 |
while read number
do
    curl -d "$number" somesite.php
done

or ... there are other ways to do it too (see other answers). The seq | while read loop has the advantage of not needing more than 7 MiB of memory to store the numbers.

It's going to take a while to curl one million pages.

share|improve this answer
    
thanks that is just what i need. –  user09120390123 Nov 26 '12 at 18:37
    
Yes. the 0 1 2 0 4 0 are another problem. but you have resolved . Thanks for that to! –  user09120390123 Nov 26 '12 at 18:41

I think this is a lot better:

for (( i=0; i<1000000; i++ )); do 
    VAL=$(printf "%06d" $i)
    curl -d "$VAL" somesite.php
done
share|improve this answer
    
Why not: for (( i=0; i<1000000; i++ )); do curl -d $(printf "%06d" $i) somesite.php; done? No need for VAL. –  Jonathan Leffler Nov 26 '12 at 18:44
    
thanks. Is useful to. But the other form is more faster. –  user09120390123 Nov 26 '12 at 18:50

Try this instead

for i in `seq -f '%06.f' 0 999999`; do
    curl -d "$i" somesite.php
done
share|improve this answer
    
That's a terrible way of doing a for loop! Also, useless use of subshell. And backticks are terrible too! –  gniourf_gniourf Nov 26 '12 at 18:38
    
Misses leading zeroes... –  Jonathan Leffler Nov 26 '12 at 18:39
    
@JonathanLeffler What do you mean? Which zeros are missing? –  Olaf Dietsche Nov 26 '12 at 18:41
    
seq 0 3 produces 0 1 2 3; the question would want 000000 000001 000002 000003 –  Jonathan Leffler Nov 26 '12 at 18:43
1  
OK - my bad...but why two commands when you could use just seq? –  Jonathan Leffler Nov 26 '12 at 18:46

why not do this?

#!/bin/bash
for ((i=0;i<1000000;++i)); do
    printf -v a "%.6d" "$i"
    curl -d "$a" somesite.php
done

Edit. Since you want to have a "more faster" method, here's the fastest I could come up with (which, incidently, is the shortest of them all):

#!/bin/bash
for i in {000000..999999}; do
    curl -d "$i" somesite.php
done
share|improve this answer
    
Why not: for ((i=0;i<1000000;++i)); do curl -d $(printf "%.6d" "$i") somesite.php; done? No need for $a. (The -v option to printf is interesting, though; it must be a shell built-in for that to work.) –  Jonathan Leffler Nov 26 '12 at 18:46
    
thanks. Is useful to. But the other form is more faster. –  user09120390123 Nov 26 '12 at 18:49
    
@fpilee I doubt it –  gniourf_gniourf Nov 26 '12 at 18:53
    
try. The @johannes_weiss form and this. but use echo not curl –  user09120390123 Nov 26 '12 at 18:58
    
@JonathanLeffler printf is a bash builtin. I don't like subshells when they are useless, hence I wouldn't use curl -d $(printf "%.6d" "$i") somesite.php. –  gniourf_gniourf Nov 26 '12 at 19:22

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