Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Can a pointer to sqlite3 handler be converted to NSData?

I would then be able to encrypt and decrypt it.

I have:

sqlite *sqliteHandle;
NSData *dataDB = [NSData dataWithBytes:&sqliteHandle length:sizeof(sqliteHandle)];

But this only gives me the pointer, not the actual data.

share|improve this question
3  
The sqllite * is a pointer to the SQLLite connection object, it is not likely you can get data out of that directly. You need to execute a query first, then extract the data from the result. –  driis Nov 26 '12 at 19:06
1  
And if the intent is to encrypt the database, that's the wrong way to do it. SQLCipher is the only way to go. –  Hot Licks Nov 26 '12 at 19:08
    
Well. SQLCipher how does SQLCipher manage this? There must be some way. –  H. A. Samad Nov 26 '12 at 19:46
1  
SQLCipher manages it very well. I'd suggest you not reinvent the wheel, especially since this one is a 4-cross with soldered spokes. –  Hot Licks Nov 26 '12 at 20:01
    
I have to. My customer does not allow the usage of any third party libraries. No matter wether open source or not. –  H. A. Samad Nov 26 '12 at 21:14

1 Answer 1

The sqllite * is a pointer to the SQLLite connection object, it is not likely you can get data out of that directly. You need to execute a query first, then extract the data from the result.

You probably want to call sqlite3_column_blob to get the raw data of a column.

Checkout the documentation; http://www.sqlite.org/capi3ref.html#sqlite3_column_blob

share|improve this answer
    
This is not what I need. I need to put the whole handler into an NSData object. –  H. A. Samad Nov 26 '12 at 19:47
    
@user1423640 -- It's not something you can "put into an NSData object". SQLite operates manages its own file in the file system, reading/writing records at a fairly low level. You'd have to somehow intercept the I/O calls and map them into your imitation files system. Maybe an interesting intellectual exercise, but kind of stupid from a business standpoint. –  Hot Licks Nov 26 '12 at 20:04
    
How about VFS to achieve this? –  H. A. Samad Nov 26 '12 at 21:15
    
Sure, go ahead! –  Hot Licks Nov 26 '12 at 21:21
    
(Though I'm kind of curious whose VFS you're going to use.) –  Hot Licks Nov 26 '12 at 21:33

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.