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I have a question concerning enumerations and floats. I'm trying to pass an enum as a float is this possible?

Here's an outline of the code:

enum
{
    none = 0,
    small,
    medium,
    large, 
} enumSize;

class size
{
    float footsize = 0.0; 
}

void setSize(size &Size, float value)
{
    Size.footsize = value; 
}

int main()
{ 
    size Size; 
    setSize(Size, enumSize); 
}

However I cannot call setSize(Size, enumSize) since as far as I know enums can only be ints and cant be casted to be a float? If that's the case is there a way to make it a float with my current setup?

If my layout is slightly confusing let me know and I'll try to address any confusion best I can.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Of course ints can be cast to floats, but an enum is not an appropriate tool for this. Just use const floats.

By the way, your code doesn't compile for several other reasons as well.

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I know that's not my exact code, its much more convoluted than the above, but the above is an example of what I'm trying to accomplish. –  sean Nov 26 '12 at 19:38
    
I agree with this approach. Where you put the const floats would depend highly on the API structure -- should a Size object know about small, medium, and large values, or should that be handled by some other intermediary? If the latter, you might put each float as a static member of a CommonSizeValues class. Yes, that's a very Java/C# way to do it, but it would work without having to deal with messy namespacing issues. –  Randolpho Nov 26 '12 at 19:42

There's no casting involved, just a conversion. Ordinary enums are integer values and when you pass one of them to a function that takes a float the value gets converted to float.

enum enumSize {
    none,
    small,
    medium,
    large
};

void f(float);

void g() {
    f(small);
}
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