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I am a novice in python but a project I am currently working on requires its use, so it gave me the the opportunity to start learning it, which I greatly enjoy doing by the way.

So far I have implemented about 80% of what I want my program to do and I am very happy with the results.

In the remaining 20% I am faced with a problem which puzzles me a bit on how to solve. Here it is:

I have come up with a list of lists which contain several numbers (arbitrary length) For example:

listElement[0] = [1, 2, 3]
listElement[1] = [3, 6, 8]
listElement[2] = [4, 9]
listElement[4] = [6, 11]
listElement[n] = [x, y, z...]

where n could reach up to 40,000 or so.

Assuming each list element is a set of numbers (in the mathematical sense), what I would like to do is to derive all the combinations of mutually exclusive sets; that is, like the powerset of the above list elements, but with all non-disjoint-set elements excluded.

So, to continue the example with n=4, I would like to come up with a list that has the following combinations:

newlistElement[0] = [1, 2, 3]
newlistElement[1] = [3, 6, 8]
newlistElement[2] = [4, 9]
newlistElement[4] = [6, 11] 
newlistElement[5] = [[1, 2, 3], [4, 9]]
newlistElement[6] = [[1, 2, 3], [6, 11]]
newlistElement[7] = [[1, 2, 3], [4, 9], [6, 11]]
newlistElement[8] = [[3, 6, 8], [4, 9]]
newlistElement[9] = [[4, 9], [6, 11]

An invalid case, for example would be combination [[1, 2, 3], [3, 6, 8]] because 3 is common in two elements. Is there any elegant way to do this? I would be extremely grateful for any feedback.

I must also specify that I would not like to do the powerset function, because the initial list could have quite a large number of elements (as I said n could go up to 40000), and taking the powerset with so many elements would never finish.

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1  
What have you tried? Also, note that this sort of combinations problem comes up a lot. –  Marcin Nov 26 '12 at 20:27
    
docs.python.org/2/library/stdtypes.html#frozenset - would be the first stop on my documentation digging –  synthesizerpatel Nov 26 '12 at 20:30
    
What is the range of possible numbers in the individual elements? –  kreativitea Nov 26 '12 at 20:31
    
Marcin: I have not tried something specific, yet I ve been trying to theorize the problem in my head. Been going towards recursive solutions but I am not sure. –  concept303 Nov 26 '12 at 20:33
    
kreativitea: The range of numbers in the typical case is from 1 to 10 numbers but in some (rare) items it can go up to 30 or so...if I remember my data correctly –  concept303 Nov 26 '12 at 20:35

6 Answers 6

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The method used in the program below is similar to a couple of previous answers in excluding not-disjoint sets and therefore usually not testing all combinations. It differs from previous answers by greedily excluding all the sets it can, as early as it can. This allows it to run several times faster than NPE's solution. Here is a time comparison of the two methods, using input data with 200, 400, ... 1000 size-6 sets having elements in the range 0 to 20:

Set size =   6,  Number max =  20   NPE method
  0.042s  Sizes: [200, 1534, 67]
  0.281s  Sizes: [400, 6257, 618]
  0.890s  Sizes: [600, 13908, 2043]
  2.097s  Sizes: [800, 24589, 4620]
  4.387s  Sizes: [1000, 39035, 9689]

Set size =   6,  Number max =  20   jwpat7 method
  0.041s  Sizes: [200, 1534, 67]
  0.077s  Sizes: [400, 6257, 618]
  0.167s  Sizes: [600, 13908, 2043]
  0.330s  Sizes: [800, 24589, 4620]
  0.590s  Sizes: [1000, 39035, 9689]

In the above data, the left column shows execution time in seconds. The lists of numbers show how many single, double, or triple unions occurred. Constants in the program specify data set sizes and characteristics.

#!/usr/bin/python
from random import sample, seed
import time
nsets,   ndelta,  ncount, setsize  = 200, 200, 5, 6
topnum, ranSeed, shoSets, shoUnion = 20, 1234, 0, 0
seed(ranSeed)
print 'Set size = {:3d},  Number max = {:3d}'.format(setsize, topnum)

for casenumber in range(ncount):
    t0 = time.time()
    sets, sizes, ssum = [], [0]*nsets, [0]*(nsets+1);
    for i in range(nsets):
        sets.append(set(sample(xrange(topnum), setsize)))

    if shoSets:
        print 'sets = {},  setSize = {},  top# = {},  seed = {}'.format(
            nsets, setsize, topnum, ranSeed)
        print 'Sets:'
        for s in sets: print s

    # Method by jwpat7
    def accrue(u, bset, csets):
        for i, c in enumerate(csets):
            y = u + [c]
            yield y
            boc = bset|c
            ts = [s for s in csets[i+1:] if boc.isdisjoint(s)]
            for v in accrue (y, boc, ts):
                yield v

    # Method by NPE
    def comb(input, lst = [], lset = set()):
        if lst:
            yield lst
        for i, el in enumerate(input):
            if lset.isdisjoint(el):
                for out in comb(input[i+1:], lst + [el], lset | set(el)):
                    yield out

    # Uncomment one of the following 2 lines to select method
    #for u in comb (sets):
    for u in accrue ([], set(), sets):
        sizes[len(u)-1] += 1
        if shoUnion: print u
    t1 = time.time()
    for t in range(nsets-1, -1, -1):
        ssum[t] = sizes[t] + ssum[t+1]
    print '{:7.3f}s  Sizes:'.format(t1-t0), [s for (s,t) in zip(sizes, ssum) if t>0]
    nsets += ndelta

Edit: In function accrue, arguments (u, bset, csets) are used as follows:
• u = list of sets in current union of sets
• bset = "big set" = flat value of u = elements already used
• csets = candidate sets = list of sets eligible to be included
Note that if the first line of accrue is replaced by
def accrue(csets, u=[], bset=set()):
and the seventh line by
for v in accrue (ts, y, boc):
(ie, if parameters are re-ordered and defaults given for u and bset) then accrue can be invoked via [accrue(listofsets)] to produce its list of compatible unions.

Regarding the ValueError: zero length field name in format error mentioned in a comment as occurring when using Python 2.6, try the following.

# change:
    print "Set size = {:3d}, Number max = {:3d}".format(setsize, topnum)
# to:
    print "Set size = {0:3d}, Number max = {1:3d}".format(setsize, topnum)

Similar changes (adding appropriate field numbers) may be needed in other formats in the program. Note, the what's new in 2.6 page says “Support for the str.format() method has been backported to Python 2.6”. While it does not say whether field names or numbers are required, it does not show examples without them. By contrast, either way works in 2.7.3.

share|improve this answer
    
I am sorry. As I said I am an absolute novice in Python so I am having a little trouble with your code, which i d really like to test. Is there a way to make function accrue take as an argument the initial list I posted and return the results list? –  concept303 Nov 27 '12 at 12:14
    
Also, this code does not work for me. It gives me an error at the print command "print "Set size = {:3d}, Number max = {:3d}".format(setsize, topnum) ValueError: zero length field name in format:. I am running python 2.6 –  concept303 Nov 27 '12 at 12:22
    
@jpwat7: What I can't figure out is what are the three arguments u, bset and cset in your function. –  concept303 Nov 27 '12 at 13:48
1  
When [x for x in accrue(map(set, scenarios))] produces [[set([1, 2])], [set([1, 2]), set([3, 4])], [set([2, 3])], [set([3, 4])]], the statement [map(list,x) for x in accrue(map(set, scenarios))] produces [[[1, 2]], [[1, 2], [3, 4]], [[2, 3]], [[3, 4]]] ie if x is a list of sets, just say map(list,x) to convert to a list of lists. –  jwpat7 Nov 27 '12 at 18:21
1  
Tested and confirmed to work faster than the other methods. –  concept303 Nov 27 '12 at 18:45

I'd use a generator:

import itertools

def comb(seq):
   for n in range(1, len(seq)):
      for c in itertools.combinations(seq, n): # all combinations of length n
         if len(set.union(*map(set, c))) == sum(len(s) for s in c): # pairwise disjoint?
            yield list(c)

for c in comb([[1, 2, 3], [3, 6, 8], [4, 9], [6, 11]]):
   print c

This produces:

[[1, 2, 3]]
[[3, 6, 8]]
[[4, 9]]
[[6, 11]]
[[1, 2, 3], [4, 9]]
[[1, 2, 3], [6, 11]]
[[3, 6, 8], [4, 9]]
[[4, 9], [6, 11]]
[[1, 2, 3], [4, 9], [6, 11]]

If you need to store the results in a single list:

print list(comb([[1, 2, 3], [3, 6, 8], [4, 9], [6, 11]]))
share|improve this answer
1  
sets in python have the built-in function isdisjoint: set(A).isdisjoint(set(B)) –  Max Li Nov 26 '12 at 20:45
    
@MaxLi: Right. But is there a built-in way to apply this to a sequence of sets (it should return True iff the sets are pairwise disjoint)? –  NPE Nov 26 '12 at 20:46
    
Thank you. This seems to work fine in a quick test. I will now try with the actual data values I have. Would it work if it had to do this for 40,000 initial list elements? I am not sure I am asking it correctly but what is its complexity? –  concept303 Nov 26 '12 at 20:57
    
@NPE: something like reduce(lambda(x,y): set(x).isdisjoint(set(y)),seq) ? –  Max Li Nov 26 '12 at 20:59
    
@concept303: It looks at all subsets, of which there are 2**n. –  NPE Nov 26 '12 at 21:01

The following is a recursive generator:

def comb(input, lst = [], lset = set()):
   if lst:
      yield lst
   for i, el in enumerate(input):
      if lset.isdisjoint(el):
         for out in comb(input[i+1:], lst + [el], lset | set(el)):
            yield out

for c in comb([[1, 2, 3], [3, 6, 8], [4, 9], [6, 11]]):
   print c

This is likely to be a lot more efficient than the other solutions in situations where a lot of sets have common elements (of course in the worst case it still has to iterate over the 2**n elements of the powerset).

share|improve this answer
    
This, with the same input as before, went from 63 seconds to 0.0009 seconds. It definitely should be recursion! Thank you so much. The worst case of all pairwise disjoint sets almost never happens in my data and if it does, it is is for cases where the initial elements are very few (1 to 3). –  concept303 Nov 26 '12 at 22:10
    
@concept303: Yes, this should be much more efficient since it avoids looking at a lot of dead ends. 40K lists might still be a bit too much for it though. –  NPE Nov 26 '12 at 22:16
    
40k is the most extreme I will have to deal with. Typical case is around 1000. I hope it handles that. I need to load the list and try. Will report! –  concept303 Nov 26 '12 at 22:21
    
Handled 13095 parcels in 125secs. Will put a larger list and leave it running for the night to see if there is a result tomorrow morning. Thank you once again so much. Awesome code! I think this answer should be moved to the top somehow if possible. –  concept303 Nov 26 '12 at 23:19
1  
@concept303: Exactly. It's possible to come up with a much, much shorter example for which this code will take a long time (due to its exponential worst-case complexity). –  NPE Nov 27 '12 at 10:41

using itertools.combinations, set.intersection and for-else loop:

from itertools import *
lis=[[1, 2, 3], [3, 6, 8], [4, 9], [6, 11]]
def func(lis):
    for i in range(1,len(lis)+1):
       for x in combinations(lis,i):
          s=set(x[0])
          for y in x[1:]:
              if len(s & set(y)) != 0:
                  break
              else:
                  s.update(y)    
          else:
              yield x


for item in func(lis):
    print item

output:

([1, 2, 3],)
([3, 6, 8],)
([4, 9],)
([6, 11],)
([1, 2, 3], [4, 9])
([1, 2, 3], [6, 11])
([3, 6, 8], [4, 9])
([4, 9], [6, 11])
([1, 2, 3], [4, 9], [6, 11])
share|improve this answer
    
That was somewhat similar to how I I was starting to approach it but you put it in working code for me. Thank you! –  concept303 Nov 26 '12 at 20:58
    
@concept303 update the solution, simplified the code by using for-else loop and generator function. –  Ashwini Chaudhary Nov 26 '12 at 21:43
    
This seems to work faster than the first answer. Is this possible? For 23 elements I am getting 1min with the first method and 15secs with yours. Hmmm...I added another 2 elements to make it 25 and the time became one minute. So this one also necessarily has an exponential time increase. –  concept303 Nov 26 '12 at 22:04

Similar to NPE's solution, but it's without recursion and it returns a list:

def disjoint_combinations(seqs):
    disjoint = []
    for seq in seqs:
        disjoint.extend([(each + [seq], items.union(seq))
                            for each, items in disjoint
                                if items.isdisjoint(seq)])
        disjoint.append(([seq], set(seq)))
    return [each for each, _ in disjoint]

for each in disjoint_combinations([[1, 2, 3], [3, 6, 8], [4, 9], [6, 11]]):
    print each

Result:

[[1, 2, 3]]
[[3, 6, 8]]
[[1, 2, 3], [4, 9]]
[[3, 6, 8], [4, 9]]
[[4, 9]]
[[1, 2, 3], [6, 11]]
[[1, 2, 3], [4, 9], [6, 11]]
[[4, 9], [6, 11]]
[[6, 11]]
share|improve this answer

One-liner without employing the itertools package. Here's your data:

lE={}
lE[0]=[1, 2, 3]
lE[1] = [3, 6, 8]
lE[2] = [4, 9]
lE[4] = [6, 11]

Here's the one-liner:

results=[(lE[v1],lE[v2]) for v1 in lE for v2  in lE if (set(lE[v1]).isdisjoint(set(lE[v2])) and v1>v2)]
share|improve this answer
    
But would this produce [[1, 2, 3], [4, 9], [6, 11]] as per OP's requirements? –  NPE Nov 26 '12 at 21:02
    
it builds only (x,y) elements, but as I see now powersets are required, sorry I missed the point –  Max Li Nov 26 '12 at 21:06
    
I made exactly the same mistake when I first read the question :) –  NPE Nov 26 '12 at 21:08

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