Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I've written an SharedQueue which is intended to work with several producers/consumers.

class SharedQueue : public boost::noncopyable
{
public:
  SharedQueue(size_t size) : m_size(size){};
  ~SharedQueue(){};

  int count() const {return m_container.size();};
  void enqueue(int item);
  bool enqueue(int item, int millisecondsTimeout);

private:
  const size_t m_size;
  boost::mutex m_mutex;
  boost::condition_variable m_buffEmpty;
  boost::condition_variable m_buffFull;

  std::queue<int> m_container;
};

void SharedQueue::enqueue(int item)
{
  {
    boost::mutex::scoped_lock lock(m_mutex);
    while(!(m_container.size() < m_size)) 
    {
      std::cout << "Queue is full" << std::endl;
      m_buffFull.wait(lock);
    }
    m_container.push(item);
  }
  m_buffEmpty.notify_one();
}

int SharedQueue::dequeue()
{
  int tmp = 0;
  {
    boost::mutex::scoped_lock lock(m_mutex);

    if(m_container.size() == 0) 
    {
      std::cout << "Queue is empty" << std::endl;
      m_buffEmpty.wait(lock);
    }

    tmp = m_container.front();
    m_container.pop();
  }

  m_buffFull.notify_one();
  return tmp;
}


SharedQueue Sq(1000);


void producer()
{
  int i = 0;
  while(true)
  {
    Sq.enqueue(++i);
  }
}

void consumer()
{
  while(true)
  {
    std::cout  << "Poping: " << Sq.dequeue() << std::endl;
  }
}

int main()
{

  boost::thread Producer(producer);
  boost::thread Producer1(producer);
  boost::thread Producer2(producer);
  boost::thread Producer3(producer);
  boost::thread Producer4(producer);

  boost::thread Consumer(consumer);

  Producer.join();
  Producer1.join();
  Producer2.join();
  Producer3.join();
  Producer4.join();

  Consumer.join(); 

  return 0;
}

As you can see I use boost::condition_variable. Is there any way to make the performance better? Perhaps I should consider any other synchronization method?

share|improve this question
    
How are you measuring "performance"? –  Chad Nov 26 '12 at 21:31
    
Chad, I mean time between placing data into the queue and taking data from it. –  D_E Nov 26 '12 at 21:35
    
Is that your bottleneck? –  Lirik Nov 26 '12 at 21:41
1  
Using a lock, only one of the producers/consumers can interact with your queue object at a time. Removing the condition variables ensures that each of them will get into the lock as fast as possible. This can lead to starvation though. Writing performant code is hard :) I'd really suggest looking into the existing tools before reinventing the wheel. –  Chad Nov 26 '12 at 22:12
1  
@D_E, I'm afraid if you have about 100 threads, then the queue design is the least of your performance problems (unless you're running on a really fat server with 32+ total cores, in which case 100 threads are OK). –  Soonts Nov 26 '12 at 22:15

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

In real-live scenarios not synthetic tests I think your implementation is good enough.

If however you're expecting 106 or more operations per second, and you're developing for Windows, then your solution is not that good.

  1. On Windows, Boost traditionally sucks really bad when you're using multithreading classes. For mutexes, CriticalSection objects are usually much faster. For cond.vars, authors of the boost are reinventing the wheel instead of using the correct Win32 API.

  2. On Windows, I expect the native multi-producers/consumer queue object called "I/O completion port" to be several times more effective than any user-mode implementation possible. It's main goal is I/O, however it's perfectly OK calling PostQueuedCompletionStatus API to post anything you want to the queue. The only drawback - the queue has no upper limit, so you must limit the queue size yourself.

share|improve this answer

This is not a direct answer to your question, but it might be a good alternative.

Depending on how much you want to increase the performance, it may be worthwhile to take a look at the Disruptor Pattern: http://www.2robots.com/2011/08/13/a-c-disruptor/

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.