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I have a large byte array and I am splitting it into multiple byte array by 1000 bytes and process them. I am using IEnumerable and I can use foreach loop but i want to know that which number of array inside IEnumerable, I am using. I can get the total count but do not know which number of byte array I am processing, so can anyone help me to figure out how to achieve this? Please let me know if you need more details.

    public static IEnumerable<byte[]> SplitSourceBytes(byte[] SrcBytes, int size)
    {
        int srcLenght = SrcBytes.Length;
        byte[] source = null;

        int i = 0;
        for (; srcLenght > (i + 1) * size; i++)
        {
            source = new byte[size];
            Array.Copy(SrcBytes, i * size, source, 0, size);
            yield return source;
        }

        int sourceLeft = srcLenght - i * size;
        if (sourceLeft > 0)
        {
            source = new byte[sourceLeft];
            Array.Copy(SrcBytes, i * size, source, 0, sourceLeft);
            yield return source;
        }
    }
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1  
If you need to know what index you are on, use a for loop, not a foreach. –  cadrell0 Nov 26 '12 at 21:46
    
By number of byte array do you mean the ith chunk of the original array? You could use a dictionary to identify the chunks. –  MGZero Nov 26 '12 at 21:47
    
Can you provide example of for loop or dictionary? –  updev Nov 26 '12 at 21:48
2  
What do you gain by splitting the large byte array in smaller chunks? The memory allocation for the large array has already been done, and you're now allocating more memory (for the small chunks). If you want to process the large byte array in small chunks, you can consider returning an enumerable of ArraySegment<byte>, for which you have an offset where it starts on the larger array (from which you can even deduce the "index") –  carlosfigueira Nov 26 '12 at 21:55
    
Can you provide code how do you use this method? –  Hamlet Hakobyan Nov 26 '12 at 21:57

3 Answers 3

You don't need to create new byte arrays; you can use an ArraySegment<byte> enumeration to "split" your large array without incurring the penalty of new byte array allocations.

public static IEnumerable<ArraySegment<byte>> SplitSourceBytes(byte[] SrcBytes, int size)
{
    int srcLength = SrcBytes.Length;
    int alreadyReturned = 0;
    while (alreadyReturned < srcLength)
    {
        int count = Math.Min(srcLength - alreadyReturned, size);
        yield return new ArraySegment<byte>(SrcBytes, alreadyReturned, count);
        alreadyReturned += count;
    }
}

And to use it, the code would look something like the one below:

foreach (var segment in SplitSourceBytes(bytes, 1000)) {
    int maxAttempts = 3;
    int attempts = 0;
    bool dataSent = false;
    while (!dataSent && attempts < maxAttempts)
    {
        try
        {
            serverStream.Write(segment.Array, segment.Offset, segment.Count);
            dataSent = true;
        }
        catch (Exception ex)
        {
            // Error, try to retransmit
            attempts++;
        }
    }
}
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This may work for what you need

        private Dictionary<int,byte[]> SplitByteArray(byte[] SrcBytes, int size)
        {
            var result = new Dictionary<int, byte[]>();
            if (SrcBytes.Length > size)
            {
                int position = SrcBytes.Length;
                int index = 0;
                for (int i = 0; i < SrcBytes.Length; i += size)
                {
                    int length = Math.Min(size, position);
                    byte[] buffer = new byte[length];
                    Buffer.BlockCopy(SrcBytes, i, buffer, 0, length);
                    result.Add(index, buffer);
                    position -= size;
                    index++;
                }
            }
            else
            {
                result.Add(0, SrcBytes);
            }
            return result;
        }
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Edit: Fixed index nubering in answer –  sa_ddam213 Nov 26 '12 at 22:07

You could place the arrays in a List that provides a count function.

public static IEnumerable<byte[]> SplitSourceBytes(byte[] SrcBytes, int size)
    {
        List<byte[]> Resultset = new List<byte[]>();

        int srcLenght = SrcBytes.Length;
        byte[] source = null;

        int i = 0;
        for (; srcLenght > (i + 1) * size; i++)
        {
            Debug.WriteLine(string.Format("Working on byte array {0}.", Resultset.Count + 1); 
            source = new byte[size];
            Array.Copy(SrcBytes, i * size, source, 0, size);
            Resultset.Add(source);
        }

        int sourceLeft = srcLenght - i * size;
        if (sourceLeft > 0)
        {
            source = new byte[sourceLeft];
            Array.Copy(SrcBytes, i * size, source, 0, sourceLeft);
            Resultset.Add(source);
        }
        return Resultset;
    }
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