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PROBLEM

I've discovered that there is a limit on the number of Web Workers that can be spawned by a browser.

Example

main HTML / JavaScript

<script type="text/javascript">
$(document).ready(function(){
    var workers = new Array();
    var worker_index = 0;
    for (var i=0; i < 25; i++) {
        workers[worker_index] = new Worker('test.worker.js');
        workers[worker_index].onmessage = function(event) {
            $("#debug").append('worker.onmessage i = ' + event.data + "<br>");
        };
        workers[worker_index].postMessage(i); // start the worker.      

        worker_index++;
    }   
});
</head>
<body>
<div id="debug">
</div>

test.worker.js

self.onmessage = function(event) {
    var i = event.data; 

    self.postMessage(i);
};

This will generate only 20 output lines in the container when using Firefox (version 14.0.1, Windows 7).

QUESTION

Is there a way around this? The only two ideas I can think of are:

1) Daisy chaining the web workers, i.e., making each web worker spawn the next one

Example:

<script type="text/javascript">
$(document).ready(function(){
    createWorker(0);
});

function createWorker(i) {

    var worker = new Worker('test.worker.js');
    worker.onmessage = function(event) {
        var index = event.data;

        $("#debug").append('worker.onmessage i = ' + index + "<br>");

        if ( index < 25) {
            index++;
            createWorker(index);
        } 
    };
    worker.postMessage(i); // start the worker.
}
</script>
</head>
<body>
<div id="debug"></div>

2) Limit the number of web workers to a finite number and modify my code to work with that limit (i.e., share the work load across a finite number of web workers) - something like this: http://www.smartjava.org/content/html5-easily-parallelize-jobs-using-web-workers-and-threadpool

Unfortunately #1 doesn't seem to work (only a finite number of web workers will get spawned on a page load). Are there any other solutions I should consider?

share|improve this question
1  
Do you encounter this limit in other browsers, too? If not, please tag your question with FF. –  Bergi Nov 26 '12 at 22:31
5  
Each browser has web workers limitations (Firefox has 20, Chrome 60+, Opera 16); however, you can change it in Firefox -> dom.workers.maxPerDomain; as for your actual question, if you can or cannot avoid this limitation, I'm not sure. "Workers (as these background scripts are called herein) are relatively heavy-weight, and are not intended to be used in large numbers." Can you give an exact situation where you would want to use more than 20 workers? –  Marius Balaban Nov 26 '12 at 22:34
    
have a look here. –  collapsar Feb 19 '13 at 14:01
    
@MariusBalaban Your comment should be an answer. –  Benjamin Gruenbaum Mar 24 '13 at 1:26
1  
@MariusBalaban "It's not possible straightforward" is the correct answer to this question :) At least at the moment. –  Benjamin Gruenbaum Mar 25 '13 at 9:43

2 Answers 2

My experience is that too many workers (> 100) decrease the performance. In my case FF became very slow and Chrome even crashed. I compared variants with different amounts of workers (1, 2, 4, 8, 16, 32). The worker performed an encryption of a string. It turned out that 8 was the optimal amount of workers, but that may differ, depending on the problem the worker has to solve.

I built up a small framework to abstract from the amount of workers. Calls to the workers are created as tasks. If the maximum allowed number of workers is busy, a new task is queued and executed later.

It turned out that it's very important to recycle the workers in such an approach. You should hold them in a pool when they are idle, but don't call new Worker(...) too often. Even if the workers are terminated by worker.terminate() it seems that there is a big difference in the performance between creating/terminating and recycling of workers.

share|improve this answer

The way you're chaining your Workers in the solution #1 impeach the garbage collector to terminate Worker instances because you still have a reference to them in the scope of your onmessage callback function.

Give a try with this code:

<script type="text/javascript">
var worker;
$(document).ready(function(){
    createWorker(0);
});
function createWorker(i) {
   worker = new Worker('test.worker.js');
   worker.onmessage = handleMessage;
   worker.postMessage(i); // start the worker.
}
function handleMessage(event) {
       var index = event.data;
       $("#debug").append('worker.onmessage i = ' + index + "<br>");

        if ( index < 25) {
            index++;
            createWorker(index);
        } 
    };
</script>
</head>
<body>
<div id="debug"></div>
share|improve this answer

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