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#include <iostream>
#include <vector>
using namespace std;

class PerformSort
{
    public:
    const vector<int> * p;
    vector<int>& getElements(int);
    vector<int>& sortArray(vector<int>&);
    void printer(vector<int>&);

}firstSort;

vector<int>& PerformSort::getElements (int num)
{
    vector<int> elements(num);
    for (int i = 0; i < num; i++)
    {
        cout << "Enter elements into the array: ";
        cin >> elements[i];
    }

    p = &elements;
    return p;
}

vector<int>& PerformSort::sortArray (vector<int>& vector)
{
    int holder, min;

    for (int i = 0; i < (sizeof(vector) - 1); i++)
    {
      min = i;
      for (int j = (i + 1); j < sizeof(vector); j++)
      {
        if (vector[j] < vector[min])
        {
          min = j;
        }
      }
      if (min != i)
      {
        holder = vector[i];
        vector[i] = vector[min];
        vector[min] = holder;
      }
    }


    return vector;
}

void PerformSort::printer(vector<int>& vector2)
{

    for (int i = 0; i < sizeof(vector2); i++)
    {
        cout << vector2[i] << " ";
    }
}

int main ()
{
    int numberOfTimes;
    cin >> numberOfTimes;
    firstSort.printer(firstSort.sortArray(firstSort.getElements(numberOfTimes)));
    return 0;
}

This returns the error: "invalid initialization of reference of type from expression of type". My first approach to create a SelectionSort algorithm was to try passing the vector by value (stupidly). After this I started to use pointers instead, after some research. However, this resulted in the aforementioned error. Declaring everything as constant does not seem to resolve the underlying error, despite how, if I understand things correctly, the error lies with temporary references being passed where constant ones are required. Any thoughts on how I might achieve this passing and returning of vectors? (I come from a Java background and am just beginning C++, so forgive me if I have made any obvious errors with regards to the pointers).

share|improve this question
1  
p = &elements; - Not a wise idea. Why not just use p in the first place and take out the pointer part of p? Also, you want vector.size(), not sizeof(vector). – chris Nov 26 '12 at 22:54
    
not too keen on the reference return from getElements() either, even if the pointer issue is addressed. – WhozCraig Nov 26 '12 at 22:58
    
Why not use a regular vector (not a reference) in your class, change your 1st and 2nd methods so they return void, call the methods separately, and operate on the vector internally? – ryanbwork Nov 26 '12 at 22:58
    
Hmmmm I like that idea, and may try to do that with the next piece of code I write. However, the quasi-functional style of doing things in just one line of code is something I find pretty cool. – Stephen Rudd Nov 26 '12 at 23:31

Return it by value:

vector<int> PerformSort::getElements (int num)
{
    vector<int> elements(num);
    for (int i = 0; i < num; i++)
    {
        cout << "Enter elements into the array: ";
        cin >> elements[i];
    }
    return elements;
}

This will also let you get rid of p, which is a huge can of worms in its own right.

Finally, I notice that you use sizeof(vector) in quite a few places. This won't give you the number of elements in the vector; use vector.size() instead.

share|improve this answer
    
Returning by value causes run-time crashes for me. Regardless of whether the vector is called vector or otherwise (thanks Luchian). – Stephen Rudd Nov 26 '12 at 23:16
    
@StephenRudd: sizeof(vector) is definitely worth fixing too. – NPE Nov 26 '12 at 23:19
    
Fixed sizeof(vector) and now I get another strange run-time error: list sorts fine, but then it starts outputting crazy large numbers. Thanks by the way chris. EDIT: Just me being stupid. Works fine. Thanks everyone, you've been very patient. – Stephen Rudd Nov 26 '12 at 23:21

Rename the variable vector to something else:

vector<int>& PerformSort::sortArray (vector<int>& wayBetterName)

&

return wayBetterName;

What urged you to name a variable the same as a type?

There's many more other issues with the code.

You don't need pointers, you don't need the references, plus you're better off just using std::sort.

share|improve this answer
2  
A good reason not to using namespace std;. – chris Nov 26 '12 at 22:56
    
Oh wow that was incredibly stupid of me. The code's not for functional use by the way, it was an old Java exercise I did that I tried converting to C++. – Stephen Rudd Nov 26 '12 at 23:13

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