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#include <iostream>
#include <string>

using namespace std;

class Person
{
    string name;

    public:
        Person():name("")
        {
            cout << "Person default ctor\n";
        }
        Person(const string& name_in):name(name_in)
        {
            cout << "Person string ctor: " << name << "\n";
        }
        ~Person()
        {
            cout << "Person dtor: " << name << "\n";
        }
        string get_name()
        {
            return name;
        }
};

class Professor:public Person
{
    int office;

    public:
        Professor(const string& name_in, int office_in):Person(name_in), office(office_in)
        {
            cout << "Professor string ctor: " << get_name() << endl;
        }
        ~Professor()
        {
            cout << "Professor dtro: " << get_name() << endl;
        }
};

int main()
{
    Person alice("Alice");
    Professor bob("Bob", 10);

    return 0;
}

I would assume that the output should be:

Person string ctor: Alice

Person dtor: Alice

Professor string ctor: Bob

Professor dtor: Bob

Since it seems like that should logically follow from the structure of the program. However, the real output is:

Person string ctor: Alice

Person string ctor: Bob

Professor string ctor: Bob

Professor dtor: Bob

Person dtor: Bob

Person dtor: Alice

Can someone explain why this is? What am I not understanding about classes/constructors/destructors that's making me come up with the wrong output?

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What would the use of an object be if it got destroyed right after it got created? Objects are destroyed at the end of the scope in the reverse order of creation. Derived classes construct their base classes first. –  chris Nov 26 '12 at 23:08

3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted

First of all, Professor derives from Person. This means that every instance of Professor implicitly contains an instance of Person (observe how you're calling Person(name_in) in Professor's constructor). This implicit instance will automatically get destroyed when the Professor object is being destroyed.

This explains why you see:

Person string ctor: Bob
Person dtor: Bob

As to the ordering of the destructor calls, the variables are destroyed in the reverse order of construction. This explains why Bob is destroyed before Alice:

Person string ctor: Alice
Professor string ctor: Bob
Professor dtor: Bob
Person dtor: Alice
share|improve this answer
    
Hah, beat me too it. +1 –  Ben Nov 26 '12 at 23:12
    
Thanks! So where in the program are the destructors called? I would think that it would happen when the object is initialized, but that doesn't appear to be so. –  Bob John Nov 26 '12 at 23:15
    
@BobJohn: The destructors get called at the end of the enclosing block (here, just before the return 0). –  NPE Nov 26 '12 at 23:16
    
@BobJohn, When allocated on the stack, when they go out of scope. When allocated on the free store, whenever delete is used. If they were destroyed right after being initialized, you wouldn't be able to use objects for more than one statement, which defeats the point. –  chris Nov 26 '12 at 23:17
1  
@BobJohn, When the ending curly brace is reached. The curly braces define scopes. You can even use them arbitrarily: int main() {int a; {Person p;} //can't use p now, but can still use a } –  chris Nov 26 '12 at 23:24

Because Professor is inherited it will call the base class constructor when it is created. That is why person Bob is printed.

As for the reverse destruction, this is because objects a destroyed in reverse order to what they were created.

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Professor "is a" Person, so when you call the Professor constructor, the constructor of its base class - which is Person - will be called first.

Similiar to the desturcter, but in reversed order. The destructor of the child class will be called first, and then the base class.

Also, destructors are only called when the objects are destroyed, which in your case, only happens when the current scope is end.

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