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This is a matrix multiply code one with i loop parallelized and another with j loop parallelized. With both the versions the value of C array is correct (I have tested with small matrix sizes). There is also no performance improvement of one over other. Can anyone please tell me what is the difference in these 2 versions. Will the array C be accurate in both the versions regardless of the size of the matrix? Thanks in advance

void mat_multiply ( void )
{
    int t;
    int i, j, k;    
    #pragma omp parallel for private(k) // parallelize i loop
    for(i = 0; i < dimension; i++)
    {
        for(j = 0; j < dimension; j++) 
        {
            for(k = 0; k < dimension; k++)
            {
                C[dimension*i+j] += A[dimension*i+k] *  B[dimension*k+j];       
            }
        }
    }
 }

 void mat_multiply ( void )
 {
     int t;
     int i, j, k;   

     for(i = 0; i < dimension; i++)
     {
         #pragma omp parallel for private(k) // parallelize j loop
         for(j = 0; j < dimension; j++) 
         {
             for(k = 0; k < dimension; k++)
             {
                 C[dimension*i+j] += A[dimension*i+k] *  B[dimension*k+j];      
             }
         }
     }
 }
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2  
Both versions are not using blocking (as in working on blocks of the matrices being multiplied) and are to the same degree unable to utilise the CPU caches effectively. With higher values of dimension the second version would become a bit slower. –  Hristo Iliev Nov 27 '12 at 10:18

1 Answer 1

At first, looks like the first version have lower thread creation overhead, since it will only create the threads once. While in the second version you will create threads dimension times.

But according to this

One may be worried about the creation of new threads within the inner loop. Worry not, the libgomp in GCC is smart enough to actually only creates the threads once. Once the team has done its work, the threads are returned into a "dock", waiting for new work to do.

In other words, the number of times the clone system call is executed is exactly equal to the maximum number of concurrent threads. The parallel directive is not the same as a combination of pthread_create and pthread_join.

On the first version you should garanty that J is also private.

Instead of the two approach you can just parallelize the nested loop. In OpenMP 3.0, the loop nesting problem can be solved by using the collapse clause in the for directive. e.g:

void mat_multiply ( void ) {

int t;
int i, j, k;    
    #pragma omp parallel for collapse(2) private (k)
    for(i = 0; i < dimension; i++)
     for(j = 0; j < dimension; j++) 
        {
            for(k = 0; k < dimension; k++)
      {
           C[dimension*i+j] += A[dimension*i+k] *  B[dimension*k+j];        
     }
  }

Btw: Have a look into a block approach, you can see an example here (starting in slide 62).

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Thank you for the reply. But I dont want to use collapse as I want to see individual performance of - 1.parallelizing ONLY i 2.parallilizing ONLY j Based on the code I have pasted, will there be any race conditions ? Can C have different results ? Thank you again in advance –  user1472972 Nov 27 '12 at 5:19
2  
@user1472972, there would be no race conditions in both versions of your code as long as the loop over k stays serial. –  Hristo Iliev Nov 27 '12 at 10:15
1  
Of course, j has to be private in the first case (I took this for common sense granted). I mean that generally the algorithm does not have race conditions since each element of C is a dot product of one row from A and one column from B, and k runs over the summation index, i.e. each element of C is touched by a single thread only. –  Hristo Iliev Nov 27 '12 at 12:12
1  
@HristoIliev Oh, ok, you were referring to that part of the code. It makes sense, each position of c is assigned to a unique thread, indeed. –  dreamcrash Nov 27 '12 at 12:16
1  
@user1472972 Np. IMO In this context theres it not much of a different . Actually you can get a little slow downs with the second approach for the reason that Hristo lliev had referee. In general I would say that parallelizing the outer loop is better than the inner loop, but it may occur that parallelizing the inner loop would make a higher reduction of the cache miss. –  dreamcrash Nov 27 '12 at 23:10

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