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I am validating a form and the text put into a form must be CIT, BIS or MATH

if(dept == ""){
     msg += "You must enter a department\n";
}else if((dept != "CIT") && (dept != "BIS") && (dept != "MATH")){
     msg += '"' + dept + '"' + " is not one of CIT, BIS, or MATH.\n";
}

I need to add some form of regex to make sure that the text CIT, BIS or MATH when input can be put in any form uppercase and lowercase.

Any help would be great Thanks

share|improve this question
    
There is no need to use a regex here. –  jahroy Nov 27 '12 at 2:00

3 Answers 3

There's no need for a regex.

Just convert your input to lowercase before validating it.

if (dept == "") {
    msg += "You must enter a department\n";
}
else if (isInvalid(dept)) {
    msg += '"' + dept + '"' + " is not one of CIT, BIS, or MATH.\n";
}

function isInvalid(u) {
  var s = u.toLowerCase();
  var validStrings = [ "cit", "bis", "math" ];
  for (var i = 0; i < validStrings.length; i++) {
      if (s === validStrings[i]) {
          return false;
      }
  }
  return true;
}

As @y_nk has pointed out, the following approach would be more efficient (if necessary):

function isValid(s) {
    var validationObject = { "cit" : true, "bis": true, "math": true };
    return validationObject[ s.toLowerCase() ] === true;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Would be more straightforward with: function isValid(str) { return ({ "cit": true, "bis": true, "math": true })[str.toLowerCase()] === true; } –  y_nk Nov 27 '12 at 4:07
    
@y_nk - I don't see any benefit to that approach. I would rather write self-documenting code that is easy to read. –  jahroy Nov 27 '12 at 4:25
    
There's no for-loop, no need to loop two times if it matches the third value. Also the toLowerCase should belong to the validation function since it's the lowercasing is mandatory. For the inlining, i'm not very found of it... i only wrote it in a line because it's a comment. –  y_nk Nov 27 '12 at 4:30
    
@y_nk - After re-reading, I'll agree that your approach is technically more efficient. However, I would still opt for the more straightforward, easy to read approach (unless there was a real reason to modify it). Especially for an array with 3 elements and code that is clearly intended to be run as validation (where it probably will not be executed multiple times in a loop). –  jahroy Nov 27 '12 at 4:53
    
Its part of an assignment and i need to use regex at some point and there is the best point. –  Pierce McGeough Nov 27 '12 at 12:58

If you really think regular expressions are the way:

if (!/^(?:BIS|CIT|MATH)$/i.test(dept)) {
}

The expression had to be anchored, which is why you also see the non-capturing group in there.

A nicer approach is this:

if (['cit', 'bis', 'math'].indexOf(dept.toLowerCase()) == -1) {
}

Unfortunately, that only works from IE9 onwards due to Array.indexOf()

share|improve this answer

Something like this

var regex = new RegExp("^CIT$|^BIS$|^MATH$", "i");

if(dept == ""){
     msg += "You must enter a department\n";
}else if(!regex.test(dept)){
     msg += '"' + dept + '"' + " is not one of CIT, BIS, or MATH.\n";
}
share|improve this answer

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