Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Just starting to use backbone and have a quick question and thought I'd write a simple message board. I want to have something that responds to the hash change detail/:id and have added this to the router like this. This seems to work but I don't think this is the proper way of doing this. Is this, in general, how a http call get an object would take place (specifically the success callback)?

var MessageBoardRouter = Backbone.Router.extend({
  routes: {
    "detail/:id" : "showDetail"//,
  },
  showDetail: function(id){
    console.log('within showDetail with ' + id);
    //var p1=new Post({header:'my original header'});
    var p2=new Post({id:id});
    p2.fetch({
     success: function(){   // <- should I be doing this or different way or is who strategy off???
     console.log(p2.attributes);
     var view= new MbDetail();
     view.render(p2);
    }
    });
 },

thx in advance

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

There are 2 ways to respond to backbone events: with a callback (like you have above) or with event bindings. I believe event bindings to be the more idiomatic and "backboney" approach for the general case for the following reasons:

  • events allow multiple places in your code to react to the same event, whereas there can only be a single callback
  • backbone is otherwise designed around events so this approach is consistent and "backboney"
  • the callback style is really only necessary if you want to override the default event dispatch behavior
  • I believe the callback style is inspired by jquery and not as consistent internally within backbone as events

However, with that in mind, both styles will work just fine. In your specific example, you might want to code it like this:

var p2=new Post({id:id});
p2.on('change', function(post){
 console.log(post.attributes);
 var view= new MbDetail();
 view.render(p2);
}
p2.fetch();

Some other ancillary points:

  • you don't necessarily need a new view instance for each fetch, you can create just one, pass the model to it's constructor, and have it rerender itself on every fetch. This will help avoid memory leaks due to left over event bindings
  • Don't pass arguments to render(). It's not designed to expect them. Pass the model to the view via the options.model constructor argument, then reference the model from within render as needed.
share|improve this answer
    
thx for response, I have updated my code to remove reference to model and placed it in the options.model for the view. Would the binding of the 'change' event cause problems with the async nature of fetch? Have to run to dinner. –  timpone Nov 27 '12 at 4:04
    
No, you call fetch, the async HTTP request is send and when the response arrives, the model will handle it and then fire the change event synchronously where you can cause the rerender. –  Peter Lyons Nov 27 '12 at 6:19

The approach of binding to a change event can work well generally if you want a consistant reaction to every event.

Backbone fetch returns a jqXHR object which can be used with Deferred objects. I find that this approach generally looks better.

This is how it would look:

var MessageBoardRouter = Backbone.Router.extend({
  routes: {
    "detail/:id" : "showDetail"//,
  },
  showDetail: function(id){
    console.log('within showDetail with ' + id);
    //var p1=new Post({header:'my original header'});
    var p2=new Post({id:id});
    var view= new MbDetail();

    p2.fetch().done(function() {
     view.render(p2);
     console.log(p2.attributes);
    });
 },
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.