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I want to create few interfaces. Hence, there is few functions for the interface as well.

My main code is as below :

int main (void)
{
    int choice;
    scanf("%d", &choice);
    while(choice != 99)
    {
        switch(choice)
        {
            case 1: title1(); break;
            case 2 : title2(); break;
            default : printf("Error");
        }
        scanf("%d", &choice);     <-- edit
    }
return 0;
}

As for the others functions :

void title1(void)
{
    int choice;
    scanf("%d", &choice);
    while(choice != 99)
    {
        switch(choice)
        {
            case 1: titleA(); break;
            case 2 : titleB(); break;
            default : printf("Error");
        }
        scanf("%d", &choice);     <-- edit
    }
main();
}
void title2()
{
    int choice;
    scanf("%d", &choice);
    while(choice != 99)
    {
        switch(choice)
        {
            case 1: titleC(); break;
            case 2 : titleD(); break;
            default : printf("Error");
        }
        scanf("%d", &choice);     <-- edit
    }
main();
}

The example of the input for the program is :

1   then    99    then    99

But the actual is :

1   then    99    then    99  then   99

which need an extra 99 to exit the program.

If I enter like this :

1   then    99    then    2    then    99

I need to input 3 times 99 to exit the program.

What is the problem with the scanf? How can I solve it?

SOLVED :

I change the return 0; in the main() to exit(0);, and it's work fine, but I'm not sure is it correct or not to do that.

share|improve this question
    
What makes you think the problem is with scanf() rather than with the way your code is using scanf()? At the least, scanf() has been tested by a lot of people on a lot of programs without finding bugs in it. Your code, I fear, has not been tested by more than one person. It is one of the marks of a tyro that he blames his tools. @John3136 has diagnosed some of the issues. You probably don't want to be calling main() from in your functions; you return from the function (by 'falling of the end') and that gets you back to the function that called it. It's one reason you need the extra 99. –  Jonathan Leffler Nov 27 '12 at 4:21
    
So, you meaning that I;m calling the main() is wrong? I should create another function for the initial interface? –  Chin Nov 27 '12 at 4:29
    
In C, it is (occasionally) OK to call main(); it C++, it is verboten. What you've got here does not look like a case where you should be calling main(). You should be returning to main(), but you do that by executing the (conceptual) return; at the end of your void title1(void) { ... /* return; */ } function, not by calling main() again. –  Jonathan Leffler Nov 27 '12 at 4:47
    
I changed the return 0 in the main() to exit(0), it's work fine. Is it correct? –  Chin Nov 27 '12 at 15:06
    
It works fine. Personally, I like to see functions return, so I prefer the 'return 0;' at the end of main. The C89 standard requires that; the C99 standard sadly allows you to omit return from the end of main() and implicitly does return 0; — but that's a rule only for main(). I think that is an appalling rule and don't use it. If you're calling main() recursively, there's a difference between return 0; and exit(0); at the end of main(). The former does not necessarily terminate the program; the latter does. I'm not sure that's enough of an excuse to use exit(0);, though. –  Jonathan Leffler Nov 27 '12 at 15:28
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3 Answers

Your scanf()s are outside the while loops where you use the value - (choice is not updated). All your methods call main() - What the?

You probably want something more self contained like:

void title1(void)
{
    int choice=0;
    while(choice != 99)
    {
        scanf("%d", &choice);
        switch(choice)
        {
            case 1: titleA(); break;
            case 2: titleB(); break;
            default: printf("Error"); 
                     break
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Oops... I forget that line, I edited it. I do had scanf inside the while loop. The problem is same. Meanwhile, I have follow your method, that assign choice to a value, but the result still the same. –  Chin Nov 27 '12 at 4:11
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I think it may help you.....i m trying to explain how your code is flowing....

when u start or execute your program it enters first in the main() function as defined->

int main (void)
{
    int choice;
    scanf("%d", &choice);
    while(choice != 99)
    {
        switch(choice)
        {
            case 1: title1(); break;
            case 2 : title2(); break;
            default : printf("Error");
        }
        scanf("%d", &choice);     <-- edit
    }
return 0;
}

so u need to enter the data for choice & u entered it as 1 so while(choice !=99) becomes true & it switches to title1() but main thing happens here.... as u enter in title() u have defined another int choice and it is local to this function so u enter again the value as 99 & it is stored in this variable because it is local. Now its while(choice != 99) becomes false so now again it calls main() & again in this call main declares int choice which also needs value to be entered again so u enters again 99 then its while(choice != 99) becomes false & then it calls return 0; & program exits.

share|improve this answer
    
Did you mean that the choice cannot repeatly used throughout the program? –  Chin Nov 27 '12 at 6:22
    
i m trying to say that if u define a variable with same name inside another function then when u try to use that variable in that function u are accessing it's local variable. so when u enter in title1() function u defined the variable named choice again so now it will be used when u try to access the variable choice but once u are out of this function this variable is removed so now u are in main so u can access its declared variable choice. Try to read about local & global variable. –  akp Nov 27 '12 at 7:35
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It is pretty simple. You could use a debugger to see what exactly is happening.

EDIT: Rewriting title1() for better clarity.

void title2()
{
    int choice;
    scanf("%d", &choice);
    while(choice != 99)
    {
        switch(choice)
        {
            case 1: titleC(); break;
            case 2 : titleD(); break;
            default : printf("Error");
        }
        scanf("%d", &choice);    
    }
    main();
    printf("About to return from title1()\n");//EDIT
    return;//EDIT
}

Lets consider the first input set.

1   then    99    then    99

In this case, 1 takes you inside title1(). and 99 brings you out of the while loop inside title1() and there is a call to main() function again. So you need to enter one more 99 to come out of the while loop in main() function. After you have come out of the while of main() control will return to title1() and "About to return from title1()" gets printed and then control returns to the main() function called by operating system. In the main() function you need to enter one more 99 to come out of the loop and exit the program.

Call stack looks like

--------------
    main()
   --------
    title1()
   --------
    main()
--------------

To exit each function you need to enter one 99.

I strongly suggest you use a debugger like GDB to walk through your program and figure out what exactly is happening.

share|improve this answer
    
When the program run, input 1 to enter title1(), and input 99 to exit title1(). Now I should in main(), so input 99 to exit the program, but it's not working, I need an extra 99 to exit the program, meaning that I need three times 99 to exit the program. –  Chin Nov 27 '12 at 6:26
    
As i mentioned earlier, main() is called twice. 1st the operating system calls main() function. And then title1() calls main. Program can only exit when the main() called by the operating system returns. Which happens when you type the second 99. –  CCoder Nov 27 '12 at 8:37
    
@AnonyNewbie Did you understand the code flow ? I suggest you to write a different interface instead of using main(). Also use 'do while' loops instead of while loops. That makes the code simpler. –  CCoder Nov 27 '12 at 16:18
    
I understand the my code flow, just notice that it's different with others language, like the Java, PHP and javascript. Now I create the interface with void function, so it's safer than calling function with return value. Thanks for the advice. –  Chin Nov 28 '12 at 3:08
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