Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a simple shell script that tests whether a password is correct (or not) against an Apple Open Directory (LDAP) server.

What I'd like is simply to lose the gobblygook error message "Authentication for node /LDAPv3/1..." and instead insert my own language such as "password does not match".

Here's what happens now:

bash-3.2# test-password 

Enter username you'd like to test password for:
jdoe

Enter Password to test for jdoe
asdasdasd
Authentication for node /LDAPv3/127.0.0.1 failed. (-14090, eDSAuthFailed)
<dscl_cmd> DS Error: -14090 (eDSAuthFailed)

What I'd prefer is:

bash-3.2# test-password 

Enter username you'd like to test password for:
jdoe

Enter Password to test for jdoe
asdasdasd
 Password matches!

So I just need to know a way so that the std out error message is muffled...

Here's the script:

#!/bin/bash
PATH=/bin:/usr/bin:/sbin:/usr/sbin export PATH
echo
echo Enter username you\'d like to test password for:
read USERNAME

echo
echo Enter Password to test for "$USERNAME"
read PASSWORD
/usr/bin/dscl /LDAPv3/127.0.0.1 auth $USERNAME $PASSWORD

if [ "$?" = "0" ]; then
       echo "Password is correct"
       exit 0

fi
share|improve this question
add comment

2 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Just throw away standard output and error:

/usr/bin/dscl /LDAPv3/127.0.0.1 auth $USERNAME $PASSWORD >/dev/null 2>&1

Unless the dscl program does something devious like open up your /dev/tty device for writing, that should take care of everything.

share|improve this answer
    
Yup, that was exactly what I was looking for. Thank you! –  Dan Nov 27 '12 at 5:07
add comment

It depends on where the error message is being written. Well-behaved UNIX programs write their errors to stderr.

/usr/bin/dscl /LDAPv3/127.0.0.1 auth $USERNAME $PASSWORD 2> /dev/null  # stderr
/usr/bin/dscl /LDAPv3/127.0.0.1 auth $USERNAME $PASSWORD  > /dev/null  # stdout
/usr/bin/dscl /LDAPv3/127.0.0.1 auth $USERNAME $PASSWORD &> /dev/null  # both

For what it's worth, you can combine this with the if statement. Also, no need for the explicit /usr/bin path in front.

if dscl /LDAPv3/127.0.0.1 auth $USERNAME $PASSWORD 2> /dev/null; then
    : # success
else
    : # failure
fi
share|improve this answer
    
John, thanks, your answer was also correct. I appreciate the detail. –  Dan Nov 27 '12 at 5:33
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.