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I'm a bit new to macros so go easy, but we have an external library that generates loads of warnings when compiled under windows (its not so bad on linux). Its a header only library so I can't just turn the warnings off for the whole library, but I can disable each section that is generating the warnings (which is a bit tedius)

So I was wondering if it is possible to create a macro, so that instead of typing the following below, i could do it in a couple of lines.

#ifdef _WIN32
#pragma warning (push)
#pragma warning(disable : 4355) // 'this' used in base member initialize list
#endif
    code that generates warning
#ifdef _WIN32
#pragma warning (pop)
#endif

However, when i try and create the macro such as below

// Disable a warning on win32 platform
// You must call DISABLE_WIN32_PRAGMA_WARN_END afterwards
#define DISABLE_WIN32_PRAGMA_WARN (nnn) \
#ifdef _WIN32 \
#pragma warning (push) \
#pragma warning(disable : nnn ) \
#endif

#define DISABLE_WIN32_PRAGMA_WARN_END \
#ifdef _WIN32 \
#pragma warning (pop) \
#endif

However I get the following errors when compiling using VS2012

error C2121: '#' : invalid character : possibly the result of a macro expansion
error C2065: 'nnn' : undeclared identifier
error C2351: obsolete C++ constructor initialization syntax
error C2612: trailing 'identifier' illegal in base/member initializer list
share|improve this question
    
short answer: no. –  Luchian Grigore Nov 27 '12 at 4:57
5  
Assuming you're using VC++, use __pragma instead of #pragma. (Hint, hint -- include your compiler info in your questions if you want concrete answers.) –  ildjarn Nov 27 '12 at 5:00
    
@ildjarn, Interesting... I don't suppose they have a __define :p –  chris Nov 27 '12 at 5:02

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted
#ifdef _WIN32

// Disable a warning on win32 platform
// You must call DISABLE_WIN32_PRAGMA_WARN_END afterwards
#define DISABLE_WIN32_PRAGMA_WARN(nnn) \
__pragma (warning (push)) \
__pragma (warning(disable : nnn)) \

#define DISABLE_WIN32_PRAGMA_WARN_END \
__pragma (warning (pop)) \

#else

#define DISABLE_WIN32_PRAGMA_WARN(nnn)
#define DISABLE_WIN32_PRAGMA_WARN_END

#endif
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, this works. I modified the non-windows version slightly so they just define blank macros (which means you can use the macros in the initializer lists where the warnings are being generated), and this compiles under linux. –  Drew Nov 27 '12 at 6:03

You can define the prologue and epilogue in a header files say "warning_arrest_prologue.h" and "warning_arrest_epilogue.h" which will contain,

#ifdef _WIN32
#pragma warning (push)
#pragma warning(disable : 4355) // 'this' used in base member initialize list
#endif

and

#ifdef _WIN32
#pragma warning (pop)
#endif

respectively. Then you could use it in the following way,

#include "warning_arrest_prologue"

// code that generates warning

#include "warning_arrest_epilogue"
share|improve this answer
    
its a good idea and would be practicle if I had just one warning type, but there are lots of different types of warnings, so i'd had a whole host of include files –  Drew Nov 27 '12 at 5:26
    
Instead of hard coding the warning number in the header file, you could use a macro which could be defined from outside before calling the inclusions. #define WARNING_NUM 4355 #include "warning_arrest_prologue". –  nanda Nov 27 '12 at 5:46

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