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//Parent.h
class Parent{
public:
   Parent(){}
   ~Parent(){}
   virtual void func1() = 0;
};

//Child.h
#include "Parent.h"
class Child : public Parent{
  int x, y;
public:
  Child() : Parent(){ //constructor

  }
  virtual void func1();
};

//Child.cpp
#include "Child.h"
void Child::Parent::func1(){

}

This compiles fine, however, I want to put the implementation of the constructor (and destructor) of Child class in its cpp file, is it possible? How?

I've tried the code below but it throws undefined reference to vtable for Child

Child::Child() : Parent(){  //in the cpp
}

Child(); //in the header file 
Child():Parent(); //also tried this one
share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted
$ cat Parent.h 
#ifndef GUARD_PARENT_H_
#define GUARD_PARENT_H_

class Parent{
public:
   Parent(){}
   ~Parent(){}
   virtual void func1() = 0;
};

#endif /* GUARD_PARENT_H_ */
$ cat Child.h
#ifndef GUARD_CHILD_H_
#define GUARD_CHILD_H_

#include "Parent.h"

class Child : public Parent{
  int x, y;
public:
  Child();
  virtual void func1();
};

#endif /* GUARD_CHILD_H_ */
$ cat Child.cpp
#include "Child.h"

Child::Child() : Parent() {
}

void Child::func1(){
}
$ cat try.cc
#include "Child.h"

int main() {
        Child c;
}
$ g++ try.cc Child.cpp
$ ./a.out
$
share|improve this answer
    
+1 -- but Parent's destructor should be either virtual or protected. –  Billy ONeal Nov 27 '12 at 6:13
    
I know, but I simply copied the code from the question. –  melpomene Nov 27 '12 at 6:15
    
Yes, that's fine. But when explaining things to a beginner this is a pitfall that you shouldn't just "copy from the question". –  Billy ONeal Nov 27 '12 at 6:18
    
Thanks to the two of you. By the way, what do you call of what you did? the adding of the guard thing so I can google it and read more about it. –  tambalolo Nov 27 '12 at 6:23
    
I think "include guards" is the usual name. (They're there because my editor adds them automatically when I start a new .h file.) –  melpomene Nov 27 '12 at 6:24

A couple of things for you to do:

  • Guard-post your header files to prevent unintended multiple inclusion.
  • Make your Parent destructor virtual
  • Initialize your non-auto member variables to determinate values.

Your final layout can look something like this.

Parent.h

#ifndef PARENT_H_
#define PARENT_H_

class Parent
{
public:
    Parent() {};
    virtual ~Parent() {};

public:
    virtual void func1() = 0;
};

#endif // PARENT_H_

Child.h

#ifndef CHILD_H_
#define CHILD_H_

#include "Parent.h"

class Child : public Parent
{
    int x,y;

public:
    Child();
    virtual ~Child();

    virtual void func1();
};
#endif

Child.cpp

Child::Child()
   : Parent()     // optional if default
   , x(0), y(0)   // always initialize members to determinate values
{
}

Child::~Child()
{
}

void Child::func1()
{
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for these tips. –  tambalolo Nov 27 '12 at 6:42
    
@markuz I hope it makes sense. get into the habit of initializing members now. It is mandatory for references, and in general a solid practice to know even your POD type members (plain old data) are initialized with known values. –  WhozCraig Nov 27 '12 at 7:16

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