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I have a table storing transaction called TRANSFER . I needed to write a query to return only the newest entry of transaction for the given stock tag (which is a unique key to identify the material) so i used the following query

SELECT a.TRANSFER_ID
     , a.TRANSFER_DATE
     , a.ASSET_CATEGORY_ID
     , a.ASSET_ID
     , a.TRANSFER_FROM_ID
     , a.TRANSFER_TO_ID
     , a.STOCK_TAG
 FROM TRANSFER a
INNER JOIN (
              SELECT STOCK_TAG
                   , MAX(TRANSFER_DATE) maxDATE
                FROM TRANSFER
               GROUP BY STOCK_TAG
            ) b
   ON a.STOCK_TAG = b.STOCK_TAG AND
      a.Transfer_Date =b.maxDATE

But i end with a problem where when more than one transfer happens on the same transfer date it returns all the row where as i need only the latest . how can i get the latest row?

edited:

transfer_id   transfer_date   asset_category_id  asset_id   stock_tag 
 1               24/12/2010      100               111         2000
 2               24/12/2011      100               111         2000
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marked as duplicate by Ben, Jonathan Leffler, John Doyle, Schleis, RandomSeed Mar 2 '14 at 20:02

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

1  
If two transfers happened on the same date, how do you expect to determine which one is the latest? (If TRANSFER.TRANSFER_ID is an incrementing field, you could select MAX(TRANSFER_ID) in the subquery instead, and then join on that value.) –  cdhowie Nov 27 '12 at 6:59
    
@cdhowie Hi, That solution worked thanks :) –  Sam Nov 27 '12 at 7:03
    
Cool. Added it as an answer. –  cdhowie Nov 27 '12 at 7:04
1  
If you ever have a situation where records are not inserted in transfer_date order then this logic of joining on max transfer_id and transfer_id will fail. I wouldn't rely on it myself. –  David Aldridge Nov 27 '12 at 7:30

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

To avoid the potential situation of rows not being inserted in transfer_date order, and maybe for performance reasons, you might like to try:

 select
   TRANSFER_ID      ,
   TRANSFER_DATE    ,
   ASSET_CATEGORY_ID,
   ASSET_ID         ,
   TRANSFER_FROM_ID ,
   TRANSFER_TO_ID   ,
   STOCK_TAG
 from (
   SELECT
     TRANSFER_ID      ,
     TRANSFER_DATE    ,
     ASSET_CATEGORY_ID,
     ASSET_ID         ,
     TRANSFER_FROM_ID ,
     TRANSFER_TO_ID   ,
     STOCK_TAG        ,
     row_number() over (
       partition by stock_tag
       order by     transfer_date desc,
                    transfer_id desc) rn
   FROM TRANSFER)
 where rn = 1
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Consider selecting MAX(TRANSFER_ID) in your subquery, assuming that TRANSFER_ID is an incrementing field, such that later transfers always have larger IDs than earlier transfers.

share|improve this answer
    
though that solution worked . Is there any other way of doing it ? –  Sam Nov 27 '12 at 7:11
    
Not from what I can see given your schema. Consider adjusting TRANSFER_DATE to be a datetime column. Then you will have second precision when looking for the latest order. –  cdhowie Nov 27 '12 at 7:12
    
Well that will be something to think about thanks. –  Sam Nov 27 '12 at 7:17

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