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see i have set of functions like this way

funtion_a();
funtion_b();
funtion_c();
|
|
funtion_y();
funtion_z();

Now this all function call internally magic()

Now when function_j() calles magic() something gone wrong and i want to debug in that case when i put any single print statement in magic then in each case

function_a() calles magic()
function_b() calles magic()
|
function_z() calles magic()

that printf is executated and its hard to see what happen in my interested case

function_j() calles magic()

So now is there any way so i can track that yes magic is called from function_j() so only in that case my debug prints comes.?

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set a flag in function_XX() then check in magic(), if set then print. –  Jeyaram Nov 27 '12 at 7:04
1  
and you can't put a breakpoint in function_j() and step into magic() because? –  StoryTeller Nov 27 '12 at 7:06
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4 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You can use following structure

int debug = 0;

function magic() {
    .
    .
    if (debug) printf("hello\n");
    .
    .
}

function a();
function b();
.
.
function j() {
   debug = 1;
   .
   .
   magic();
   .
   .
   debug = 0;
}
function k();
.
.
.
function z();
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i am working in linux kernel code so can not make breakpoints and debuger so i like this approch..!! –  Mr.32 Nov 27 '12 at 8:01
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Yes there is. It's called a debugger. gdb or whatever. If you put a breakpoint in your code, you can display the call stack and see the functions that were called. You will have to study your specific debugger for the commands. Some are integrated in an IDE, some are command line tools, some are stand alone. Let google help you to find the right one for your environment and your preferences.

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oh i am working in linux kernel code so can not run on ide and set break points. –  Mr.32 Nov 27 '12 at 7:58
1  
Yeah, and how are we supposed to know that? It would have been a good idea to state it in the question, that you couldn't use a normal debugger. Because without context, it is the obvious first answer. –  tristopia Nov 27 '12 at 12:09
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You haven't posted your prototype for magic() so I'm going to make one up:

int magic(int a, int b);

Now, given this prototype, add these lines below that definition in the header where this prototype is defined:

inline int real_magic(int a, int b) { return magic(a, b); }

#define magic(a, b) (printf(__func__ " calling magic()\n"), real_magic((a), (b)))

In the translation unit where magic() is implemented, you'll have to #undef the macro:

#undef magic

int magic(int a, int b)
{
    // implementation
}

#define magic(a, b) (printf(__func__ " calling magic()\n"), real_magic((a), (b)))

You will have to adjust the macro and the real_magic wrapper to match your arguments and return type.

This is a terrible hack, but it's the simplest mechanism I can come up with to meet your requirements. Consider using a proper debugger instead, as they will allow much deeper inspection of your program state at the moment of the error, including variable values and an entire stack trace.

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"This is a terrible hack" - that's why you should probably use the functions in <execinfo.h>... –  user529758 Nov 27 '12 at 7:12
    
@H2CO3 That would be a better way to do it, yes, if that facility is available. –  cdhowie Nov 27 '12 at 7:14
    
Yes. Unfortunately it's not standard C. (But IIRC most OSes that matter, including Linux and OS X, provide it.) –  user529758 Nov 27 '12 at 7:16
1  
@H2CO3 Well then consider this the portable terrible hack. ;) –  cdhowie Nov 27 '12 at 19:04
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I'd suggest using a debugger, as other have mentioned. However, if you're in a hurry, and given that you've already written all those diagnostic printfs, couldn't you just pipe your output through grep so you can see the lines that you're interested in?

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