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I'm wondering how to read user input in Rust.

I intend to make a tokenizer, so first thing I need is to read every single line the user types and stops reading once the user presses <ctrl-D>

I googled around and only found this one example on Rust IO which does not even compile.

I looked at the module io doc on rust-lang.org and found that read_line() function is part of ReaderUtil interface, but stdin() returns Reader instead.

The code that I would like would essentially look like the following in C++

vector<string> readLines () {
    vector<string> allLines;
    string line;

    while (cin >> line) {
        allLines.push_back(line);
    }

    return allLines;
}

I am very new to Rust, so any help would be greatly appreciated!

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4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Use the ReaderUtil trait to access the read_line function. Note that you need to explicitly cast the value to a trait type, eg, reader as io::ReaderUtil

Rust v0.4 code

fn main() {
        let mut allLines = ~[];
        let reader = io::stdin();

        while !reader.eof() {
                allLines.push((reader as io::ReaderUtil).read_line());
        }

        for allLines.each |line| {
                io::println(fmt!("%s", *line));
        }
}
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1  
I don't think I quite understand how cast works in Rust. :-( It doesn't seem all that similar to casts I'm used to in C/C++. What does it mean when you cast something to a trait type? Does it simply instruct the compilers to let you bind those methods from the trait type onto the thing you're casting from? (in this case, it's whatever returns from stdin()...) –  BeyondSora Nov 28 '12 at 14:36
    
I am not well familiar with Rust internals, but I guess the cast is for the type checker because the actual method to call is decided at runtime. –  Bilal Husain Nov 28 '12 at 15:31
1  
hmm okay. This is the kind of solution that I wanted. So your answer is accepted :-) Thanks! –  BeyondSora Nov 28 '12 at 18:39

Rust 0.11 (see 0.11 documentation):

use std::io;

fn main() {
    for line in io::stdin().lines() {
        print!("{}", line.unwrap());
    }
}

Rust 0.10 (see 0.10 documentation):

use std::io;

fn main() {
    for line in io::stdin().lines() {
        io::print(line.unwrap());
    }
}

Note that io::print(...) can also be written as print!("{}", ...) (first argument is a format string literal).

Rust 0.9 (see 0.9 documentation):

use std::io;
use std::io::buffered::BufferedReader;

fn main() {
    let mut reader = BufferedReader::new(io::stdin());
    for line in reader.lines() {
        print(line);
    }
}

Rust 0.8:

use std::io;

fn main() {
    let lines = io::stdin().read_lines();
    for line in lines.iter() {
        println(*line);
    }
}

Rust 0.7:

use std::io;

fn main() {
    let lines = io::stdin().read_lines();
    for lines.iter().advance |line| {
        println(*line);
    }
}
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2  
awesome. Rust has come a long way :) –  BeyondSora Jul 9 '13 at 19:10
2  
See The future of iterators in Rust on rust-dev for a discussion about how the for loop could become simpler in the future (basically get rid of .iter().advance). –  robinst Jul 9 '13 at 21:29
    
This can actually be for io::stdin().each_line |line| { .. }, or using extra::fileinput: for fileinput::input |line| { .. } –  dbaupp Jul 23 '13 at 8:13

Uh... After many trials and errors, I've found a solution.

I'd still like to see a better solution so I'm not going to accept my own solution.

The code below prints exactly what the user inputs.

mod tokenizer {

pub fn read () -> ~[int] {
    let reader = io::stdin();
    let mut bytes: ~[int] = ~[];

    loop {
        let byte: int = reader.read_byte();
        if byte < 0 {
            return bytes;
        }
        bytes += [byte];
    }
}

}

fn main () {
    let bytes: ~[int] = tokenizer::read();
    for bytes.each |byte| {
        io::print(#fmt("%c", *byte as char));
    }
}
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This is what I have come up with (with some help from the friendly people in the #rust IRC channel on irc.mozilla.org):

use core::io::ReaderUtil;

fn read_lines() -> ~[~str] {
    let mut all_lines = ~[];

    for io::stdin().each_line |line| {
        // each_line provides us with borrowed pointers, but we want to put
        // them in our vector, so we need to *own* the lines
        all_lines.push(line.to_owned());
    }

    all_lines
}

fn main() {
    let all_lines = read_lines();

    for all_lines.eachi |i, &line| {
        io::println(fmt!("Line #%u: %s", i + 1, line));
    }
}

And proof that it works :)

$ rustc readlines.rs
$ echo -en 'this\nis\na\ntest' | ./readlines
Line #1: this
Line #2: is
Line #3: a
Line #4: test
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