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What tricks do people use to manage the available memory of an interactive R session? I use the functions below [based on postings by Petr Pikal and David Hinds to the r-help list in 2004] to list (and/or sort) the largest objects and to occassionally rm() some of them. But by far the most effective solution was ... to run under 64-bit Linux with ample memory.

Any other nice tricks folks want to share? One per post, please.

# improved list of objects
.ls.objects <- function (pos = 1, pattern, order.by,
                        decreasing=FALSE, head=FALSE, n=5) {
    napply <- function(names, fn) sapply(names, function(x)
                                         fn(get(x, pos = pos)))
    names <- ls(pos = pos, pattern = pattern)
    obj.class <- napply(names, function(x) as.character(class(x))[1])
    obj.mode <- napply(names, mode)
    obj.type <- ifelse(is.na(obj.class), obj.mode, obj.class)
    obj.size <- napply(names, object.size)
    obj.dim <- t(napply(names, function(x)
                        as.numeric(dim(x))[1:2]))
    vec <- is.na(obj.dim)[, 1] & (obj.type != "function")
    obj.dim[vec, 1] <- napply(names, length)[vec]
    out <- data.frame(obj.type, obj.size, obj.dim)
    names(out) <- c("Type", "Size", "Rows", "Columns")
    if (!missing(order.by))
        out <- out[order(out[[order.by]], decreasing=decreasing), ]
    if (head)
        out <- head(out, n)
    out
}
# shorthand
lsos <- function(..., n=10) {
    .ls.objects(..., order.by="Size", decreasing=TRUE, head=TRUE, n=n)
}
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1  
Wow. Awesome function. Thanks Dirk. –  Christopher DuBois Aug 31 '09 at 15:36
2  
Thanks. I edited the posting to give credit to P Pikal and D Hinds -- credit where credit is due! –  Dirk Eddelbuettel Aug 31 '09 at 15:50
    
Excellent function! I'll definitely add it to my .Rprofile. –  Vince Jun 15 '10 at 5:33
3  
if you want to see the objects within a function, you have to use: lsos(pos = environment()), otherwise it'll only show global variables. To write to standard error: write.table(lsos(pos=environment()), stderr(), quote=FALSE, sep='\t') –  Michael Kuhn Apr 5 '11 at 11:56
3  
@pepsimax: This has been packaged in the multilevelPSA package. The package is designed for something else, but you can use the function from there without loading the package by saying requireNamespace(multilevelPSA); multilevelPSA::lsos(...). Or in the Dmisc package (not on CRAN). –  krlmlr Nov 12 '13 at 10:22
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15 Answers

Ensure you record your work in a reproducible script. From time-to-time, reopen R, then source() your script. You'll clean out anything you're no longer using, and as an added benefit will have tested your code.

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26  
My strategy is to break my scripts up along the lines of load.R and do.R, where load.R may take quite some time to load in data from files or a database, and does any bare minimum pre-processing/merging of that data. The last line of load.R is something to save the workspace state. Then do.R is my scratchpad whereby I build out my analysis functions. I frequently reload do.R (with or without reloading the workspace state from load.R as needed). –  Josh Reich Sep 1 '09 at 16:33
14  
That's a good technique. When files are run in a certain order like that, I often prefix them with a number: 1-load.r, 2-explore.r, 3-model.r - that way it's obvious to others that there is some order present. –  hadley Sep 4 '09 at 13:02
2  
I can't back this idea up enough. I've taught R to a few people and this is one of first things I say. This also applies to any language where development incorporates a REPL and a file being edited (i.e. Python). rm(ls=list()) and source() works too, but re-opening is better (packages cleared too). –  Vince Jun 15 '10 at 5:31
9  
The fact that the top-voted answer involves restarting R is the worst criticism of R possible. –  sds Jul 15 '13 at 20:44
4  
@MartínBel that only removes objects created in the global environment. It does not unload packages or S4 objects or many other things. –  hadley Dec 19 '13 at 14:09
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I use the data.table package. With its := operator you can :

  • Add columns by reference
  • Modify subsets of existing columns by reference, and by group by reference
  • Delete columns by reference

None of these operations copy the (potentially large) data.table at all, not even once.

  • Aggregation is also particularly fast because data.table uses much less working memory.

Related links :

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4  
Upvote. (Someone upvoted my answer and I noticed Matthew's answer which is far more deserving of even more votes. Bravo data.table.) –  BondedDust Dec 19 '12 at 6:24
    
Here, here. Current project with be a royal PITA without data.table. –  Ari B. Friedman Oct 21 '13 at 17:57
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Saw this on a twitter post and think it's an awesome function by Dirk! Following on from JD Long's answer, I would do this for user friendly reading:

# improved list of objects
.ls.objects <- function (pos = 1, pattern, order.by,
                        decreasing=FALSE, head=FALSE, n=5) {
    napply <- function(names, fn) sapply(names, function(x)
                                         fn(get(x, pos = pos)))
    names <- ls(pos = pos, pattern = pattern)
    obj.class <- napply(names, function(x) as.character(class(x))[1])
    obj.mode <- napply(names, mode)
    obj.type <- ifelse(is.na(obj.class), obj.mode, obj.class)
    obj.prettysize <- napply(names, function(x) {
                           capture.output(print(object.size(x), units = "auto")) })
    obj.size <- napply(names, object.size)
    obj.dim <- t(napply(names, function(x)
                        as.numeric(dim(x))[1:2]))
    vec <- is.na(obj.dim)[, 1] & (obj.type != "function")
    obj.dim[vec, 1] <- napply(names, length)[vec]
    out <- data.frame(obj.type, obj.size, obj.prettysize, obj.dim)
    names(out) <- c("Type", "Size", "PrettySize", "Rows", "Columns")
    if (!missing(order.by))
        out <- out[order(out[[order.by]], decreasing=decreasing), ]
    if (head)
        out <- head(out, n)
    out
}

# shorthand
lsos <- function(..., n=10) {
    .ls.objects(..., order.by="Size", decreasing=TRUE, head=TRUE, n=n)
}

lsos()

Which results in something like the following:

                      Type   Size PrettySize Rows Columns
pca.res                 PCA 790128   771.6 Kb    7      NA
DF               data.frame 271040   264.7 Kb  669      50
factor.AgeGender   factanal  12888    12.6 Kb   12      NA
dates            data.frame   9016     8.8 Kb  669       2
sd.                 numeric   3808     3.7 Kb   51      NA
napply             function   2256     2.2 Kb   NA      NA
lsos               function   1944     1.9 Kb   NA      NA
load               loadings   1768     1.7 Kb   12       2
ind.sup             integer    448  448 bytes  102      NA
x                 character     96   96 bytes    1      NA

NOTE: The main part I added was (again, adapted from JD's answer) :

obj.prettysize <- napply(names, function(x) {
                           capture.output(print(object.size(x), units = "auto")) })

I couldn't think of any other way to get the output from print(...) and so used capture.output(), which I'm sure is very inefficient :)

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I love Dirk's .ls.objects() script but I kept squinting to count characters in the size column. So I did some ugly hacks to make it present with pretty formatting for the size:

.ls.objects <- function (pos = 1, pattern, order.by,
                        decreasing=FALSE, head=FALSE, n=5) {
    napply <- function(names, fn) sapply(names, function(x)
                                         fn(get(x, pos = pos)))
    names <- ls(pos = pos, pattern = pattern)
    obj.class <- napply(names, function(x) as.character(class(x))[1])
    obj.mode <- napply(names, mode)
    obj.type <- ifelse(is.na(obj.class), obj.mode, obj.class)
    obj.size <- napply(names, object.size)
    obj.prettysize <- sapply(obj.size, function(r) prettyNum(r, big.mark = ",") )
    obj.dim <- t(napply(names, function(x)
                        as.numeric(dim(x))[1:2]))
    vec <- is.na(obj.dim)[, 1] & (obj.type != "function")
    obj.dim[vec, 1] <- napply(names, length)[vec]
    out <- data.frame(obj.type, obj.size,obj.prettysize, obj.dim)
    names(out) <- c("Type", "Size", "PrettySize", "Rows", "Columns")
    if (!missing(order.by))
        out <- out[order(out[[order.by]], decreasing=decreasing), ]
        out <- out[c("Type", "PrettySize", "Rows", "Columns")]
        names(out) <- c("Type", "Size", "Rows", "Columns")
    if (head)
        out <- head(out, n)
    out
}
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I make aggressive use of subset with selection of only the needed variables when passing dataframes to the data= argument of regression functions. It does result in some errors if I forget to add variables to both the formula and the select= vector, but it still saves a lot of time due to decreased copying of objects and reduces the memory footprint significantly. Say I have 4 million records with 110 variables (and I do.) Example:

Mayo.PrCr.rbc.mdl <- 
cph(formula = Surv(surv.yr, death) ~ age + Sex + nsmkr + rcs(Mayo, 4) + 
                                     rcs(PrCr.rat, 3) +  rbc.cat * Sex, 
     data = subset(set1HLI,  gdlab2 & HIVfinal == "Negative", 
                           select = c("surv.yr", "death", "PrCr.rat", "Mayo", 
                                      "age", "Sex", "nsmkr", "rbc.cat")
   )            )
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up vote 15 down vote accepted

To further illustrate the common strategy of frequent restarts, we can use littler which allows us to run simple expressions directly from the command-line. Here is an example I sometimes use to time different BLAS for a simple crossprod.

 r -e'N<-3*10^3; M<-matrix(rnorm(N*N),ncol=N); print(system.time(crossprod(M)))'

Likewise,

 r -lMatrix -e'example(spMatrix)'

loads the Matrix package (via the --packages | -l switch) and runs the examples of the spMatrix function. As r always starts 'fresh', this method is also a good test during package development.

Last but not least r also work great for automated batch mode in scripts using the '#!/usr/bin/r' shebang-header. Rscript is an alternative where littler is unavailable (e.g. on Windows).

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I never save an R workspace. I use import scripts and data scripts and output any especially large data objects that I don't want to recreate often to files. This way I always start with a fresh workspace and don't need to clean out large objects. That is a very nice function though.

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That's a good trick.

One other suggestion is to use memory efficient objects wherever possible: for instance, use a matrix instead of a data.frame.

This doesn't really address memory management, but one important function that isn't widely known is memory.limit(). You can increase the default using this command, memory.limit(size=2500), where the size is in MB. As Dirk mentioned, you need to be using 64-bit in order to take real advantage of this.

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11  
Isn't this only applicable to Windows? –  Christopher DuBois Sep 19 '09 at 11:51
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For both speed and memory purposes, when building a large data frame via some complex series of steps, I'll periodically flush it (the in-progress data set being built) to disk, appending to anything that came before, and then restart it. This way the intermediate steps are only working on smallish data frames (which is good as, e.g., rbind slows down considerably with larger objects). The entire data set can be read back in at the end of the process, when all the intermediate objects have been removed.

dfinal <- NULL
first <- TRUE
tempfile <- "dfinal_temp.csv"
for( i in bigloop ) {
    if( !i %% 10000 ) { 
        print( i, "; flushing to disk..." )
        write.table( dfinal, file=tempfile, append=!first, col.names=first )
        first <- FALSE
        dfinal <- NULL   # nuke it
    }

    # ... complex operations here that add data to 'dfinal' data frame  
}
print( "Loop done; flushing to disk and re-reading entire data set..." )
write.table( dfinal, file=tempfile, append=TRUE, col.names=FALSE )
dfinal <- read.table( tempfile )
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I quite like the improved objects function developed by Dirk. Much of the time though, a more basic output with the object name and size is sufficient for me. Here's a simpler function with a similar objective. Memory use can be ordered alphabetically or by size, can be limited to a certain number of objects, and can be ordered ascending or descending. Also, I often work with data that are 1GB+, so the function changes units accordingly.

showMemoryUse <- function(sort="size", decreasing=FALSE, limit) {

  objectList <- ls(parent.frame())

  oneKB <- 1024
  oneMB <- 1048576
  oneGB <- 1073741824

  memoryUse <- sapply(objectList, function(x) as.numeric(object.size(eval(parse(text=x)))))

  memListing <- sapply(memoryUse, function(size) {
        if (size >= oneGB) return(paste(round(size/oneGB,2), "GB"))
        else if (size >= oneMB) return(paste(round(size/oneMB,2), "MB"))
        else if (size >= oneKB) return(paste(round(size/oneKB,2), "kB"))
        else return(paste(size, "bytes"))
      })

  memListing <- data.frame(objectName=names(memListing),memorySize=memListing,row.names=NULL)

  if (sort=="alphabetical") memListing <- memListing[order(memListing$objectName,decreasing=decreasing),] 
  else memListing <- memListing[order(memoryUse,decreasing=decreasing),] #will run if sort not specified or "size"

  if(!missing(limit)) memListing <- memListing[1:limit,]

  print(memListing, row.names=FALSE)
  return(invisible(memListing))
}

And here is some example output:

> showMemoryUse(decreasing=TRUE, limit=5)
      objectName memorySize
       coherData  713.75 MB
 spec.pgram_mine  149.63 kB
       stoch.reg  145.88 kB
      describeBy    82.5 kB
      lmBandpass   68.41 kB
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Unfortunately I did not have time to test it extensively but here is a memory tip that I have not seen before. For me the required memory was reduced with more than 50%. When you read stuff into R with for example read.csv they require a certain amount of memory. After this you can save them with save("Destinationfile",list=ls()) The next time you open R you can use load("Destinationfile") Now the memory usage might have decreased. It would be nice if anyone could confirm whether this produces similar results with a different dataset.

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2  
yes, I experienced the same. The memory usage drops even to 30% in my case. 1.5GB memory used, saved to .RData (~30MB). New session after loading .RData uses less than 500MB of memory. –  f3lix Aug 2 '12 at 13:50
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  1. I'm fortunate and my large data sets are saved by the instrument in "chunks" (subsets) of roughly 100 MB (32bit binary). Thus I can do pre-processing steps (deleting uninformative parts, downsampling) sequentially before fusing the data set.

  2. Calling gc () "by hand" can help if the size of the data get close to available memory.

  3. Sometimes a different algorithm needs much less memory.
    Sometimes there's a trade off between vectorization and memory use.
    compare: split & lapply vs. a for loop.

  4. For the sake of fast & easy data analysis, I often work first with a small random subset (sample ()) of the data. Once the data analysis script/.Rnw is finished data analysis code and the complete data go to the calculation server for over night / over weekend / ... calculation.

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Just to note that data.table package's tables() seems to be a pretty good replacement for Dirk's .ls.objects() custom function (detailed in earlier answers), although just for data.frames/tables and not e.g. matrices, arrays, lists.

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The use of environments instead of lists to handle collections of objects which occupy a significant amount of working memory.

The reason: each time an element of a list structure is modified, the whole list is temporarily duplicated. This becomes an issue if the storage requirement of the list is about half the available working memory, because then data has to be swapped to the slow hard disk. Environments, on the other hand, aren't subject to this behaviour and they can be treated similar to lists.

Here is an example:

get.data <- function(x)
{
  # get some data based on x
  return(paste("data from",x))
}

collect.data <- function(i,x,env)
{
  # get some data
  data <- get.data(x[[i]])
  # store data into environment
  element.name <- paste("V",i,sep="")
  env[[element.name]] <- data
  return(NULL)  
}

better.list <- new.env()
filenames <- c("file1","file2","file3")
lapply(seq_along(filenames),collect.data,x=filenames,env=better.list)

# read/write access
print(better.list[["V1"]])
better.list[["V2"]] <- "testdata"
# number of list elements
length(ls(better.list))

In conjunction with structures such as big.matrix or data.table which allow for altering their content in-place, very efficient memory usage can be achieved.

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The llfunction in gData package can show the memory usage of each object as well.

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If only it'd order by size by default... –  krlmlr Jun 28 at 18:21
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