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I am calculating the average of some values. Everything works fine. What I want to do is to round the double to the 2nd decimal place.

e.g.

I would have 0.833333333333333333 displayed as 0.83

Is there anyway to do this?

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1  
use string.Format –  Zaki Nov 27 '12 at 8:51
1  
Do you want to get a double or a string? –  888 Nov 27 '12 at 9:10

6 Answers 6

Round the double itself like:

Math.Round(0.83333, 2, MidpointRounding.AwayFromZero);

(You should define MidpointRounding.AwayAwayFromZero to get the correct results. Default this function uses bankers rounding. read more about bankers rounding: http://www.xbeat.net/vbspeed/i_BankersRounding.htm so you can see why this won't give you the right results)

Or just the display value for two decimals:

myDouble.ToString("F");

Or for any decimals determined by the number of #

myDouble.ToString("#.##")
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1  
The default value is MidPointRounding.ToEven. And this confirms with IEEE standard. Hence it should be left alone i.e. default value. –  Milind Thakkar Nov 27 '12 at 9:05
1  
@MilindThakkar it depends on the application - I have seen a company that has a self billing system that needs to have different rounding schemes for different suppliers. Either rounding method could be correct, but that is for Duncan to know, and choose. –  Rowland Shaw Nov 27 '12 at 9:09
    
it's not about display value, and will fail on 0.857, will return 0.86 and not 0.85 as requested by OP: –  Tigran Nov 27 '12 at 9:15
    
@Tigran it'll indeed give 0.86 if the input is 0.857. But it isn't asked for to give 0.85 by this input. His example shows 0.8333 which doesn't say it has to cut off or round. –  middelpat Nov 27 '12 at 9:18

You say displays as - so that would be:

var d = value.ToString("f2");

See Standard numeric format strings

If you actually want to adjust the value down to 2dp then you can do what @middelpat has suggested.

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Use

Math.Round(decimal d,int decimals);

as

Math.Round(0.833333333,2); 

This will give you the result 0.83.

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This won't always be correct. Take a look at banker's rounding: xbeat.net/vbspeed/i_BankersRounding.htm You should specify the 3rd parameter MidpointRounding.AwayFromZero –  middelpat Nov 27 '12 at 8:57
    
@middelpat: The standard way is to .ToEven which is true as per IEEE standard. It is not good reason to down-vote. –  Milind Thakkar Nov 27 '12 at 9:07
    
I didn't downvote, just added a comment. The downvote was someone else. –  middelpat Nov 27 '12 at 9:08
1  
@middelpat - yes someone has come to this thread and downvoted many valid answers... –  Andras Zoltan Nov 27 '12 at 9:11
double d = 0.833333333333333333;
Math.Round(d, 2).ToString();
share|improve this answer
    
This won't always be correct. Take a look at banker's rounding: xbeat.net/vbspeed/i_BankersRounding.htm You should specify the 3rd parameter MidpointRounding.AwayFromZero –  middelpat Nov 27 '12 at 8:57
1  
@middelpat: The standard way is to .ToEven which is true as per IEEE standard. It is not good reason to down-vote. –  Milind Thakkar Nov 27 '12 at 9:08

Try

decimalVar = 0.833333333333333333;
decimalVar.ToString ("#.##");
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If you want to see 0.85781.. as 0.85, the easiest way is to multiply by 100, cast to int and divide by 100.

int val = (int)(0.833333333333333333 * 100); 
var result = val /100;

It should produce the result you're looking for.

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2  
@dowvoter: reason ? –  Tigran Nov 27 '12 at 9:14

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